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Tag Archives: California

California hikes payments for stressed e-scrap companies

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CalRecycle staff said their recommendation to raise payment rates was based on updated cost data submitted by e-scrap collectors and processors, as well as other factors. | DAMRONG RATTANAPONG/Shutterstock

Citing difficult market conditions and rising costs for the industry, California officials will greatly increase the rates they pay e-scrap firms to collect and recycle electronics.

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A look at where California’s CRT glass is going

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Data shows that the total pounds processed through California’s electronics recycling program have been falling since 2012. | Boonchuay1970/Shutterstock

This article has been corrected.

Over the past three years, fewer of California’s CRTs are going directly to hazardous waste landfills and more are flowing through intermediate glass processors, state data shows. But that may not mean more glass is ultimately being recycled.

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Collector ordered to pay restitution for California fraud

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The owner of an e-scrap collection company will pay restitution after pleading guilty to fraudulent business practices. | VN Photo Lab / Shutterstock

This story has been updated and corrected.

The owner of a defunct Orange County, Calif. company must pay more than $150,000 in restitution after investigators found he defrauded the state’s electronics recycling program.

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Processor: Lithium-ion battery troubles go beyond collection

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Close-up of a Li-ion battery.

Regulators are looking at lithium-ion battery labeling requirements, but improper collection of the batteries is just one of their recycling challenges. | Allyson Kitts/Shutterstock

California officials are considering regulating lithium-ion battery labels, but an e-scrap processor says they’re missing a bigger issue: Battery-containing electronics are increasingly expensive to process.

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