Business handshake at meeting.

Rebranded as Green Wave Electronics, the combined business will expand into new e-scrap collection markets. | Blue Planet Studio / Shutterstock

Atlanta-based QGistix recently purchased Green Wave Computer Recycling, an Indianapolis recycler, and will rebrand as Green Wave Electronics.

The companies on Aug. 20 announced the acquisition, noting that the combined business provides a larger footprint and geographical reach. It also allows the newly formed company to offer a wider array of services than the formerly separate firms.

QGistix has been focused on a variety of reverse logistics services, including managing returns of failed parts, repair and refurbishment, and more. Green Wave Computer Recycling is active in the ITAD and e-scrap processing sector, providing “complete, auditable, e-waste recycling solutions for businesses, organizations, government agencies, solid waste districts, and the general public,” the announcement stated.

The two businesses have long had similar missions, according to the announcement.

“Since inception, both QGistix and Green Wave Computer Recycling have been dedicated to a zero-waste business model and have focused on the 100% reuse or recycle of electronics,” said Mark Sherman, CEO of QGistix. “This was the motivation behind the decision to name the combined company Green Wave Electronics and retire the QGistix brand name.”

The new business has the ability to provide a “complete suite of reverse logistics tools,” the company stated. These cover what Green Wave Electronics calls the nine “Rs.” They are repair, refurbishment, repackaging, returns management, replacement programs, remarketing, redistribution, redeployment and recycling.

Michael Hiday of Green Wave Computer Recycling said a key benefit of the acquisition is the geographical expansion. He said it will “enable us to efficiently expand our e-waste collection footprint from the Midwest to now service school districts, corporations, and solid waste districts in the Southeast.”

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