Plastics Recycling Update Magazine

Updated: 1 day 14 hours ago

Study: 5.25 trillion plastic pieces in ocean

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:43
Study: 5.25 trillion plastic pieces in ocean

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 18, 2014

A study released by an anti-pollution organization frames the world's plastic marine debris issue in stark terms.

The report, published in journal PLOS ONE and undertaken by the 5 Gyres Institute, suggests "a minimum" of 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic weighing roughly 269,000 tons can be found in the world's oceans.

The research team says the abundance of plastic pollution and its effect on ocean ecosystems "provid[es] further rationale to monitor (and take steps to mitigate) the global distribution and abundance of plastic pollution."

First discovered in 1988, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, an area of floating and swirling plastics debris in the North Pacific Ocean, has been the subject of increased scrutiny from environmental activists and, of late, scientists. The 5 Gyres Institute is also an activist group focused on reducing the flow of discarded plastics into waterways and oceans.

The group's study is the first to estimate a global marine debris figure for plastics "of all sizes," researchers say. Data was collected through 24 expeditions between 2007 and 2013. During those trips, researchers collected plastics debris samples and used them to arrive at the overall estimate through detailed computer models.

According to the American Chemistry Council, 185 projects have been undertaken voluntarily by 60 associations around the world to reduce marine debris litter. Those associations recently banded together to issue the Declaration of the Global Plastics Associations for Solutions on Marine Litter.

Researchers from the 5 Gyres Institute did find "an apparent dearth of microplastics" during their expeditions. "This study also found a 100-fold discrepancy between expected microplastic weight and abundance and their observations, indicating a tremendous loss of microplastics," the study states.

UV degradation, biodegradation, ingestion by organisms, decreased buoyancy due to fouling organisms, entrainment in settling detritus, and beaching are cited as possible causes of the lack of micro plastics found. The group is holding firm to its expectation that 40,000 tons of microplastics are still out there to be detected.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: Book your hotel room and save

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:41
Plastics Recycling 2015: Book your hotel room and save

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 18, 2014

To get the most out of the upcoming Plastics Recycling Conference, be sure to stay at the host hotel, the Hyatt Regency Dallas at Reunion. All the conference events will be taking place at the Hyatt Regency, so by booking your room there, you'll ensure your place at the center of the networking and deal-making action.

Plus, if you book before the conference room block is sold out, you can get a room at the discounted rate of $198, plus taxes. In addition, staying at the host hotel helps guarantee lower lodging costs for future iterations of the Plastics Recycling Conference. Book your hotel room here.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


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Sonoco offers details on its plant-based HDPE

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:38
Sonoco offers details on its plant-based HDPE

By Dan Leif, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 18, 2014

Another global plastics player is producing bottles derived in part from plants, further indication that packaging heavyweights see recycling as only one part of the sustainability equation.

Earlier this month, South Carolina-based Sonoco announced it had begun production of plant-based HDPE in a packaging partnership with cleaning products brand Ecover.

According to Sonoco, 75 percent of the molecular weight of the bottles comes from bio-based sources and the remaining 25 percent is made using post-consumer recycled material. The products can be recycled in traditional HDPE streams, a company executive said in an email interview.

"Anywhere that accepts HDPE will accept this material," wrote John Wilson, Sonoco product manager. "Bio-based HDPE retains the same properties as petroleum-based HDPE and therefore it does not contaminate the recycling stream."

The development of bio-based HDPE follows a similar project from Coca-Cola in the PET realm. The beverage giant has in recent years pushed its PlantBottle packaging into a growing number of markets around the world.

Like Coca-Cola, Sonoco and Ecover use sugar cane as a starting point in the generation of the plant component of the HDPE resin, which they call Plantplastic.

"We take sustainably harvested sugarcane and refine it into sugar," Wilson said. "The sugar is then fermented and distilled to produce ethanol. The ethanol is dehydrated to produce ethylene, which is polymerized to produce the plastic. We chose sugarcane specifically because sugar drives the fermentation process."

The extrusion blow-molded Ecover bottles using Plantplastic first became available to consumers in August 2014 and thus far, rollout has occurred only in the North American market. According to Wilson, Ecover and Sonoco worked together to develop an "optimal blend" and Sonoco procures material from resin suppliers and manufacturers the bottles.

The push toward bio-based plastics has sparked criticism from some recycling advocates, who say packaging companies have backed off of recycled content claims as they've moved ahead on plant-based plastic technologies.

Plastic producers counter they view packaging sustainability holistically and that plant-based resin offers significant environmental benefits. In a press release announcing the Plantplastic product, Sonoco stated, "The bio-resin … uses up to 90 percent less energy and emits 75 percent less greenhouse gases compared to petroleum-based virgin resin."

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Poly pipe holds back Arkansas recycling rate

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:35
Poly pipe holds back Arkansas recycling rate

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 18, 2014

Arkansas' annual review of recycling performance shows the state has increased its recycling rate to 39 percent, with plastics the only major material category to see decreases.

Representing a 4 percentage point increase from last year's rate, the 2014 rate, covering July 2013 through June 2014, was buoyed by new markets for glass in the state as well as bolstered paper and metal recycling figures, a report from the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality states.

On the plastics side, however, a wet year meant less demand within the agricultural industry for irrigation, a system reliant on poly pipe, or polyethylene. Poly pipe recycling tonnages came in at 66,111 during the year, a nearly 25 percent decrease from 2013 totals of 87,397 tons.

"When you have a wet year you're going to have less use of that pipe," Robert Hunter, the recycling and marketing manager at ADEQ, told Plastics Recycling Update. "That makes a huge difference."

The decrease in poly pipe recycling was enough to push overall plastics recycling down by about 16 percent.

That said, PET (up 110 percent percent), HDPE (up 49 percent) and LDPE (up 21 percent) all saw increases in diversion during the year in Arkansas.

"I think communities are making larger public awareness campaigns and I think we're also seeing programs where we had source separation come on-line to curbside in the last year or so," Hunter said.

On the whole, overall landfilling of waste generated in the state fell 5 percent, coming in at 3,265,463 tons, while recycling was up 13 percent, reaching 1,086,820 tons. Waste generation was slightly up during the year at 5,352,283 tons.


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PetroChem Wire: Nylon 6 price falls on weak demand

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:33
PetroChem Wire: Nylon 6 price falls on weak demand

Dec. 18, 2014

Prices for recycled nylon 6 post-industrial pellets dropped in the first half of December by at least 2 cents per pound to 79-81 cents per pound FOB Eastern U.S.

The price weakness is attributed to competition from imports and sluggish demand.

Prices for nylon 6 bales are under downward pressure, further contributing to the weakness in the overall nylon picture. Offers of natural nylon 6 fiber bales were reported at 58-60 cents per pound mid-month, with offers at 62 cents per pound FOB Eastern U.S. rejected by would-be buyers.

In the prime nylon market, nylon 6 made in China was offered at 91 cents per pound ex-works around the second week of December, delivery not included.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Long-haul shipping prices could drop next year

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:30
Long-haul shipping prices could drop next year

By Dan Leif, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 18, 2014

An amendment included in the $1 trillion spending bill passed last weekend by Congress suspends two provisions of a trucking rule that long-haul firms say have crunched efficiency. That could mean lower logistics prices for mills and export buyers.

The trucking provisions in the bill relate to hours-of-service (HOS) regulations that were introduced in 2013 and which many trucking firms and groups have fiercely opposed.

Here's how industry publication Transport Topics characterized the change brought about by the spending bill: "The legislation suspends the requirement that all qualifying restarts contain two consecutive periods of time between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and that it can only be used once every 168 hours (or seven days). In other words, the restart rule reverts back to the simple 34-hour restart in effect from 2003 to June 2013."

The HOS requirements will be dropped for a year, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will conduct a study showing the impact of altering the legislation. With the regulations suspended, long-haul truckers will be able to increase their weekly maximum driving hours from 70 to 82.

From a recycling perspective, the entities most likely to be affected are mills and other companies that buy material from one section of the country and pay long-haul services to transport it to their manufacturing bases. Companies that buy material for export could also see lower prices – those companies typically pay to have material shipped to U.S. ports before it is moved into foreign markets.


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NewsBits

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 13:26
NewsBits

Dec. 18, 2014

Jamaica has launched its first PET recycling project, encouraging residents to drop off plastic beverage containers at various sites on the island, the Jamaica Observer reports. Officials will establish depot centers where PET containers will be accepted and baled. The project aims to recover nearly 4,700 tons of PET containers and create more than 3,000 jobs over the next three years.

A Germany-based investment firm has purchased U.K.-based plastics recycling company Eco Plastics, PRW.com reports. Under the deal, the purchaser, Aurelius, will become the full owner of the Continuum recycling joint venture it established with Coca-Cola Enterprises two years ago. The partnership ensures Coca-Cola Enterprises bottles in the U.K. will contain a minimum of 25 percent recycled content.

A $1 million competitive grant has been awarded to a California plastics recycling firm, according to the Turlock City News. The grant from CalRecycle’s Recycled Fiber, Plastic and Glass Grant Program will enable Peninsula Plastics Recycling to recover nearly half of the byproduct created from its current recycling process and recycle it into landscaping material.

Officials in a major plastics recycling region of China are reportedly acting to move processors to government-sanctioned industrial areas that have pollution controls. According to Plastics News' The China Blog, regulators in the city of Guangzhou are no longer approving new plants, a development that may indicate an increased focus on cleaning up the country's scrap processing sector.

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Baltimore bag ban gets sacked

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:39
Baltimore bag ban gets sacked

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 10, 2014

Baltimore's mayor has vetoed a city ordinance that would have banned plastic checkout bags.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced her decision in a letter to City Council last week. Following the bill's passage on Nov. 10, Rawlings-Blake promised to veto the ban.

In her letter, Rawlings-Blake explains she disagreed “with the process by which the bill passed," according to a report from local NPR affiliate WYPR. A last-minute change leading up to the vote turned the ordinance, which originally called for a 5-cent fee on plastic bags, into an outright ban.

"There was no looming deadline in this case or a reason for amending the entire nature of a bill," the mayor writes.

Despite the change to a ban, City Council had passed the measure by a vote of 11-1.   Three-quarters of the Council now must vote in favor of overriding the veto, but according to a report in the Baltimore Sun, garnering that support is unlikely.

Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young defended the change, citing concerns that a nickel fee would be a financial burden on families.

"I decided the best course of action was an outright ban," Young said. "The research is clear: We know that reducing our usage of plastic bags has a direct impact on the health of our waterways."

Had Rawlings-Blake signed off on the ordinance, Baltimore would have become one of the first East Coast cities to move to ban plastic checkout bags. The growth of local bag bans in California was seen as a factor in the Golden State banning bags statewide earlier this year.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: Additional exhibitor space now available

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:37
Additional exhibitor space now available

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 10, 2014

The fast-approaching Plastics Recycling Conference has seen record levels of interest for exhibitor space. In response, we've secured more real estate for booths, and that space is available now.

The conference offers an array of sponsorship, exhibiting and advertising options that provide your organization with a cost-effective way to promote products and services. To secure your company's representation at the largest gathering in North American plastics recycling, head here.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. More than 1775 attendees from 30 countries were on hand at the 2014 edition, and a similar turnout is expected in Dallas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


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Can UK recycle 50 percent of its flexible film?

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:35
Can UK recycle 50 percent of its flexible film?

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 10, 2014

Packaging and recycling stakeholders in the U.K. are banding together through a research and development project to increase the recyclability of flexible film packaging.

The Reflex project – which counts Dow Chemical, Nestlé, Sita and Unilever as founding members – will aim to achieve its goal through design innovations as well as new recycling systems, such as advanced optical sorters. Led by Axion Consulting, the project has received more than $1 million in funding from the U.K. government and is expected to lead to sizable increases in the region's flexible film recycling rate.

“It is anticipated that the market will follow a similar model to that for plastic bottle recycling and take 10 years to mature to a point at which more than 50 percent of flexible packaging is diverted from the waste stream,” Axion representatives wrote in a statement.

Similar efforts are underway in the U.S., where both the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers and American Chemistry Council, among others, are spearheading efforts to drive recycling of flexible packaging through design and systems innovation.

In applying for government funding, Reflex members noted "virtually all" of the 600,000 tons of flexible packaging generated each year ends up in landfills.

"Our vision is to achieve a circular economy for flexible packaging and divert it from landfill," the group states.

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Scrap plastic export figures fall at end of Q3

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:33
Scrap plastic export figures fall at end of Q3

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 10, 2014

The latest figures on exports of scrap plastics show recent drop-offs in activity, but this year continues to significantly outpace 2013.

Exports of scrap plastics in September 2014, the most recent month for which data is available, dropped from August levels, but overall scrap plastic exports are still up from 2013 through the first three quarters of 2014.

September saw a steep 9.2 percent month-to-month decrease from August 2014 export levels, with 403.40 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in September. When matched against September 2013 levels, the volume of plastic scrap exports was up by a robust 18.3 percent. Last year scrap plastic export numbers were low due to the effects of China's Green Fence customs policy.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in September 2014, at 20.86 cents per pound, was up slightly from its August 2014 standing by 1.9 percent. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, however, the price was up by 5.9 percent.

Year-to-date (YTD) figures for scrap plastics showed strong gains. With 3.57 billion pounds exported through the third quarter of 2014, the volume of recovered plastics sent outside of U.S. borders was up 16.7 percent from its YTD 2013 figure. At 19.90 cents per pound, however, the average price for the first nine months of 2014 was down by 2.3 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

 

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled polypropylene price declines

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:25
PetroChem Wire: Recycled polypropylene price declines

Dec. 10, 2014

Prices for recycled polypropylene continued to fall in the first week in December.

HoPP black pellets were assessed at 51 to 53 cents per pound on Dec. 5, down a penny from the previous week and down about 5 cents from the beginning of November. Prices for PP regrind dropped 1 to 2.5 cents per pound the first week in December. Weaker demand and a softer prime polypropylene market contributed to the price erosion.

Meanwhile, prime HoPP injection material dropped 10 cents from early November to 78 cents per pound on Dec. 5.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:23
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 10, 2014

A Chinese bottle recycling plant waits for feedstock while $100 million is invested in a PET operation in the United Arab Emirates. Head to our global plastics rundown for more.

China's lone bottle-to-bottle recycling operation is facing major feedstock challenges due to the country's powerful informal recycling sector. Able to process 2.2 billion containers per year, the Incom Recycle Co. operation in Beijing has been unable to get any of its assembly lines up and running since opening four years ago. According to China news source CCTV America, approximately 90 percent of container recycling in China is conducted through the informal sector.

United Arab Emirates-based reclaimer Asian Fibers has invested $100 million in a monumentally scaled PET recycling facility. The facility, set to open in May of 2015, will hire an estimated 600 workers and span a reported 860,000-square-foot site. The operation will turn PET bottles into regenerated polyester staple fiber.

U.K.-based Eco Plastics is looking for a buyer. A one-time recycling partner of Coca-Cola Enterprises, the company is engaged in discussions "with interested parties" after citing “operational challenges at Eco plastics and unfavorable market conditions” earlier this year.

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NewsBits

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 11:21
NewsBits

Dec. 10, 2014

Fans of the Detroit Lions cheered on their hometown football team at Ford Field last Sunday with the help of green towels made from recycled water bottles. Part of the #TurnItGreen partnership between the team and "sustainability partner" Unifi, the towel giveaway was intended to promote recycling awareness. Close to 200,000 plastic bottles were recycled to make the towels, using Unifi's Repreve recycled fiber.

A Massachusetts musician is looking to finance a new album using a unique model: She's gathering bottles and cans that will be turned into cash through the state's deposit program.

Speaking of redemption programs, Oregon's system will soon be adding its 11th Bottle Drop site. The new location, slated to open Dec. 18, will be the first inside Portland city limits. BottleDrop locations use mechanized sorting and allow residents to quickly drop off bags of redeemable containers – the applicable cash redemption total is added to a user's account within two days.

Petoskey Plastics was awarded a $175,000 grant from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management for recycling expansion at Petoskey's facility in Hartford City, Indiana. The firm, one of four companies recently awarded Indiana grants, focuses on plastic film recycling and production.

 

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APR raises concerns over two possible labeling actions

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 11:03
APR raises concerns over resin code redesign

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers has voiced concern about two developments in plastics identification that could have significant recycling implications.

APR's November newsletter, which was sent out by email Nov. 21, featured an update from Dave Cornell, technical consultant for the group, on discussions currently being led by global standards organization ASTM International. The worries center on ASTM members potentially redrafting the resin code symbol and labeling plastics with degradable additives as "landfill degradable."

Those conversations are being had in two separate subcommittees of ASTM's 700-member-strong D 20 plastics committee.

ASTM voluntary standards are developed through member dialogue, and Cornell noted current APR participation in D 20 subcommittee groups needs to improve.

"APR member involvement is greatly needed," Cornell wrote. "There are currently parties involved that can outvote APR in both subcommittees."

In subcommittee D 20.95, ASTM is actively reviewing a redesign of the plastics resin code, which would essentially replace the chasing arrows design with a "solid line triangle." APR's concern, according to Cornell, lies in the fact that the current conversation does not include the resin codes themselves. Cornell stated APR member input is needed to stress the importance of introducing additional codes and/or officially including new resin formulations in the established Nos. 1-7 system.

"Is PETG a No. 1, or, if not, what?" Cornell asked. "For HDPE and PP, we have the same questions."

Meanwhile, Cornell explained, ASTM's subcommittee D 20.96 is undertaking a separate discussion surrounding degradable plastics. At present, ASTM is pondering support for a "landfill degradable" symbol on plastic products made with degradable additives. APR is opposed to the measure, Cornell stated, noting the group is against degradable additive use altogether until it can be demonstrated additives do not negatively affect the quality of the plastics recycling stream.

"We consider an ASTM standard that allows declaration of landfill degradability to be a significant issue unless 'no harm done' has been shown per our tests," Cornell wrote.

ASTM's D 20 plastics committee meets twice a year, in April and November, with three days of technical meetings. Joining the committee costs $75.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: The view from the top

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:59
Plastics Recycling 2015: The view from the top

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

Attendees of the upcoming Plastics Recycling 2015 conference will have a great chance to stay ahead of the competition by getting first-hand perspectives from the top brass of four leading plastics recycling trade associations.

Plastics Recycling 2015 will showcase a facilitated dialogue between Steve Alexander (Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers), Bill Carteaux (SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association), Steve Russell (American Chemistry Council) and Robin Wiener (Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries). These experts will tackle questions on topics such as North America's evolving waste stream, dynamic resin markets, the current business environment for plastics recycling and the ways sustainability goals are affecting the industry.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. More than 1775 attendees from 30 countries were on hand at the 2014 edition, and a similar turnout is expected in Dallas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Container deposit in Oregon will likely double

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:57
Container deposit in Oregon will likely double

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

A recent webinar on Oregon's beverage deposit program highlighted both the advances and challenges of the nation's longest standing bottle redemption program.

Hosted by the Container Recycling Institute (CRI) as part of its ongoing webinar series, the session featured presentations from Peter Spendelow with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, John Andersen with the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative (OBRC) and Clayton Kyle from software developer and recycling firm CLYNK. The webinar was moderated by CRI's president, Susan Collins.

Both Spendelow and Andersen ceded the state isn't meeting legislative expectations when it comes to redemption rates.

At about 71 percent, the redemption rate "is not very good," Spendelow said.

If Oregon fails to reach an 80 percent redemption rate for two years in a row, an automatic doubling of the deposit amount will go into effect in 2017. That would mean a dime bounty on covered bottles and cans, up from the current five-cent deposit.

"I'm nearly certain we won't get to 80 percent, barring a miracle, so it's very likely [a] 10 cent [container deposit] will occur in Oregon and that would be in January of 2017," Andersen said.

Part of the challenge, according to Spendelow, comes down to the state's strong curbside recycling network, which makes it easier for consumers to toss their beverage containers in the bin instead of redeeming them at stores and redemption centers. Though containers recovered through curbside systems are counted in the state's container recycling rate, they do not count toward the redemption rate.

Spendelow noted the addition of water bottles as another issue facing redemption rates. With consumption of water bottles often occurring outside of the home, consumers typically dispose of them wherever possible, including via public space trash cans.

A third major deterrent noted by Spendelow and Andersen is the poor consumer redemption experience at grocery stores that act as redemption sites.

Unlike most other deposit programs in the U.S., Oregon's program does not provide a "handling fee" to redemption sites. Grocery stores are required to offer redemption services and swallow whatever maintenance and service costs come along with it.

"The result has been a worsening of redemption experience for consumers," Spendelow suggested. "A grocer in Oregon gets nothing out of the process other than providing good customer service."

As a result, those redemption areas aren't always as clean or welcoming as consumers would like.

"It's a combination of the value you get when you return your container versus the effort and muck you go through to get it," Andersen said.

Those difficulties aside, the program has benefited from a solution of sorts, webinar participants noted. OBRC, a beverage industry co-op owned by local distributors and bottlers, has started rolling out "BottleDrop" redemption centers throughout the state to phase out nearby grocery store options. While generally considered less convenient than redemption services offered at grocery stores, the BottleDrop sites have been successful both in terms of getting more containers and improving the customer experience.

According to Andersen, the 10 redemption centers up and running in Oregon now account for 30 percent of the state's redemption volume. That's compared to the 10 percent pulled in by grocery stores that were permitted to stop offering redemption services if they were within a few miles of the new hubs.

The BottleDrop centers have benefited from software developed by CLYNK, a Maine-based company that's provided Oregon its consumer-facing program. Under the CLYNK system, Oregon residents coming into redemption centers can easily redeem containers and automatically pool redemption fees into a CLYNK account, which can be turned into cash or used at checkout at grocery stores.

OBRC expects to build 35 more centers in the next nine years, closing approximately 200 to 300 of the 3,000 grocery store redemption areas now in place, Andersen said. While it won't replace the grocery store model altogether, Andersen hopes the redemption center model will help increase overall consumer experience.

"Industry has been proactive in providing solutions and as retailers and distributors, we care about the recycling of containers," Andersen said.

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Recycling of ag plastics on the rise

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:53
Recycling of ag plastics on the rise

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

Representatives of the agricultural plastics recycling industry say activity in their sector has been growing in 2014.

According to the Ag Container Recycling Council (ACRC) and CropLife America, recovery efforts in 2014 are expected to divert 10 million pounds of agricultural container-based plastics. That would represent a 10 percent increase over 2013 efforts, which diverted about 9 million pounds of the material.

ACRC says the group has helped recycle 150 million pounds of agricultural plastics over the past 22 years.

The field has seen increased investment of late on both ends of the country. In May, Florida Agricultural Plastic Recyclers announced an expansion of its 65,000 square foot Avon Park facility. In August of 2013, Command Packaging opened a plant in Salinas, California with the aim of recovering 100,000 pounds of ag plastics per year to use in making reusable plastic bags.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled frac melt HDPE falls

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:51
PetroChem Wire: Recycled frac melt HDPE falls

Dec. 3, 2014

Recycled HDPE homopolymer (dairy) fell 1 cent per pound during the week ended Nov. 21 to 84-86 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast.

Black and mixed color post-consumer FM copolymer grades also dropped a penny, as did post-industrial grades of FM copolymer HDPE. Black and mixed color regrind was down 2-2.5 cents per pound.

Weak demand ahead of the holiday period was cited for the price erosion. Lower prime polyethylene prices also were seen contributing to the softness in recycled PE. U.S .Gulf spot blow mold HDPE, for instance, fell 3 cents per pound to 76.5 cents per pound from Nov. 13 to Nov. 20.

HDPE post-consumer dairy repro, meanwhile, fell 3 cents per pound the last week in November as a large-volume seller cleared out higher priced inventory and booked orders for late November and December. Business was reported at 79-85 cents per pound FOB Southern U.S., down from 84-86 cents per pound a week earlier.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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NewsBits

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:47
NewsBits

Dec. 3, 2014

Recent research shows a combination of two sorting technologies is effective in separating plastics from obsolete electronics, especially those plastics containing brominated fire retardants. Two researchers at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy tested a new way to detect bromine compounds in plastics. Rosa Taurino and Maria Cannio found that X-ray spectroscopy alone can estimate bromine concentrations, although with a degree of uncertainty. Taurino and Cannio determined that using Raman spectroscopy along with X-ray spectroscopy improved sortation accuracy to a purity level that complies with new European hazardous substances regulations.

A county in Nova Scotia is adding expanded polystyrene (EPS) to its curbside recycling program. The first county to do so, Kings County will recycle that curbside collected material using a typical densification process through a partnership between Valley Waste Resource Management and Scotia Recycling Limited.

An indictment could be imminent for the owner of a Canadian plastics recycling firm and a pair of brokers accused of illegally shipping hazardous waste to the Philippines. After a review of the case, Canada's Department of Justice has recommended the indictment of Adelfa Eduardo, said to be the owner of Chronic Plastics, and brokers Sherjun Saldon and Leonora Flores for their involvement in allegedly shipping 50 containers of plastic mixed with garbage and hazardous waste to the Philippines. The type of hazardous waste contained in the cargo is not known at this time.

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