Plastics Recycling Update Magazine

Updated: 1 hour 59 min ago

Santa Fe adds plastics

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:20
Santa Fe adds plastics

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 29, 2015

As part of a new partnership with Friedman Recycling, New Mexico's Santa Fe County has added plastics numbered 3-7 to its curbside and drop-off recycling services.

The addition, agreed to earlier this month, will allow residents of the county, which includes the city of Santa Fe, to place a wide array of plastic packaging into their recycling bins. It's also expected to save the Santa Fe Solid Waste Management Authority, which oversees and operates waste and recycling services for the county, roughly $200,000 annually through a revenue sharing clause in the deal, according to the Authority's announcement.

In addition to long-time program recyclables PET and HDPE, residents will now be able to include a wide array of plastics products and packaging in bins, including:

  • All plastic containers including water bottles, milk jugs, laundry soap containers, clamshells, yogurt containers and other plastic packaging materials
  • All milk / juice cartons and drink packaging

As with most curbside recycling collection programs, residents are not permitted to place plastic bags or expanded polystyrene in their bins. While the county continues to eye a move to single-stream recycling collection, residents will still be required to separate glass recyclables from paper and plastic.

As part of the agreement, all recyclables will be sent to Friedman's Albuquerque facility for sorting and processing. Previously, a limited list of recyclables had been sent to the Management Authority-operated Buckman Recycling Center, but the city and county had faced pressure to expand its list of recyclable items to increase its recycling rate from its current standing of about 11 percent.

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Plastics Recycling 2016: Best in the business

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:20
Plastics Recycling 2016: Best in the business

July 29, 2015

Next February marks the 11th iteration of the Plastics Recycling Conference, and our event's staying power is a testament to the innovative opportunities and business-boosting environment offered at the conference every year.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is produced by Resource Recycling, Inc., the publisher of Plastics Recycling Update and other recycling journals. Our editorial staff analyzes and investigates plastics recycling like no other organization. And that means the Plastics Recycling Conference is able to bring fresh, objective viewpoints that guide attendees into the sector's current and future profit centers.

In addition, our staff's relationships with individual attendees, recycling firms of all sizes and hotel and logistics groups give the Plastics Recycling Conference an edge when it comes to personalized service, competitive pricing and networking needs.

As you plan your event and trade show calendar for next year, choose Plastics Recycling 2016, the industry conference with a proven track record of business-boosting content.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and get all the facts on exhibiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.


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Exports of scrap plastics robust

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:18
Exports of scrap plastics robust

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 29, 2015

Exports of scrap plastics from the U.S. continued to climb for the third consecutive month.


May saw month-to-month increase of 10.1 percent from April 2015 export levels, with 495.12 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in May 2015. When matched against May 2014 levels, the volume of plastic scrap exports was also up by a robust 16.5 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports was flat in May, at 18.38 cents per pound, up just 0.1 percent from its April 2015 standing. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 7.1 percent.

Through May, at 1.94 billion pounds, the volume of recovered plastics exported was up 1.0 percent from its 2014 year-to-date (YTD) figure. At 18.49 cents per pound, the average price through May was down, however, by 6.3 percent from its 2014 YTD standing.

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CORRECTION: PetroChem Wire: Recycled polypropylene prices drop

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:17
CORRECTION: PetroChem Wire: Recycled polypropylene prices drop

July 29, 2015

Edit: A price for mixed color extrusion grade HoPP flake was erroneously reported as injection grade. The corrected version of the story follows. 

HoPP extrusion-grade flake prices dropped 1 to 2 cents per pound for the week ended July 24.

Mixed color extrusion grade was reported at 25 to 28 cents per pound delivered Upper Midwest. HoPP injection grade also fell, though less sharply, with mixed colors regrind selling for 40 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast, down a half a cent.

In the domestic prime grade polypropylene resale market toward the end of the week, off-grade HoPP IM was heard at around 64 to 65 cents per pound railcar delivered.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Procter & Gamble to increase recycled content in fabric care containers

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:16
Procter & Gamble to increase recycled content in fabric care containers

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 29, 2015

Global consumer products company Procter & Gamble plans to boost the amount of post-consumer resin in its Fabric Care line of product containers.

Procter & Gamble (P&G) will boost the recycled content to up to 50 percent for 230 million containers, which represents a portion of the Fabric Care containers, P&G announced. The containers will hit store shelves starting in 2016. They include the brands Ariel, Dash, Lenor and Unstopables.

The move will mean using an additional 4,190 tons of post-consumer recycled plastics per year, according to the press release. The announcement covers both HDPE and PET containers, Global Fabric Care Sustainability spokesperson Katrin Meincke told Plastics Recycling Update.

P&G currently uses at least 25 percent PCR in various categories of product containers, including laundry detergents, fabric softeners, hard surface cleaners, and others, she said. Starting next year, bottles on shelves will range from 25 percent to 50 percent PCR. In the U.S., Downy Unstopables containers, for example, will increase from 35 percent to 50 percent PCR, Meincke noted.

"This announcement calls on organizations and households to ensure they recycle, adding more recycled material to the supply chain," Meincke said. "This is just the start of our journey and we are excited to work with suppliers to increase the scope in the future."

Meanwhile, letsrecycle.com reports P&G is in discussions to buy recycled HDPE from a U.K.-based supplier.

P&G's goal is to double its use of post-consumer recycled content in plastic packaging by 2020, compared to a 2010 baseline. The company has taken steps to encourage increased recycling of plastics. It joined the American Chemistry Council's Flexible Film Recycling Group, industry-funded efforts The Recycling Partnership and the Closed Loop Fund and is a member of the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers.

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Patent watch

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:16
Patent watch

July 29, 2015

Patent No. 9,061,443 was awarded to Neutraubling, Germany-based KRONES AG for a plastics sortation method and device.

SABIC Global Technologies, headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, has developed a high-heat recycled polycarbonate resin, the subject of Patent No. 9,062,196.

A separation process for removing plastics from mixed materials is the subject of Patent No. 9,067,214, awarded to Evansville, Ind.-based Berry Plastics Corporation.

Beaverton, Ore.-based Nike, Inc. was given Patent No. 9,074,061 for a method of recycling scrap ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) foam.

Patent No. 9,074,092, which describes a method of producing polyester using recycled PET materials, was awarded to the Eastman Chemical Company, based in Kingsport, Tenn.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database at http://patft.uspto.gov/.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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"I Want To Be Recycled" video contest winners announced

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:15
"I Want To Be Recycled" video contest winners announced

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 29, 2015

Don't make fun of John, the plastic soap container who wants to become a hair brush in another life, because he could very well realize his dream.

That's the comical message behind one of the winners of a video contest connected to the "I Want To Be Recycled" campaign. The contest, launched as part of Keep America Beautiful's ongoing outreach campaign, sought videos from consumers to show trash given another life through recycling.

The contest is part of the campaign's latest phase launched in March, which targets recyclable items that are commonly found in bathrooms. And the winner of the "I Want To Be Recycled" video contest targets that very subject.

The first place overall winner is a clip called "Potty Talk" and involves bathroom objects discussing how important recycling is.

 


 

John the plastic bottle is featured in "Did You Guys Hear About John," the winner in the contest's "Upcycling Made Beautiful" category.

 


Keep America Beautiful and The Ad Council jointly announced the winners of the video contest, which aims to encourage increased recycling. The videos will be shared through the groups' communications channels, and the winners will share in a cash prize pool of $25,000.

According to the group, the campaign, originally launched in 2013, has "generated nearly $90 million in donated media to date," and leads consumers to the campaign website, IWantToBeRecycled.org, which includes information on recycling and an online MRF game.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:14
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 29, 2015

While many jurisdictions debate whether to impose levies on thin plastic bags, officials in Botswana disagree on whether one was actually put in place years ago. And an environmental anthropologist says New Zealand needs its own levy on bags to reduce their usage.

Years ago, Botswana imposed a levy on thin plastic retail bags, an attempt to reduce their usage. Or did it? Mmegionline.com reports there's confusion and disagreement in the sparcely populated southern Africa country over whether a levy was actually imposed and, if it was, which department should collect it. Stores are charging for bags, but one source says the government isn't collecting the money, which was supposed to pay for environmental projects.

The U.K.'s Axion Polymers is urging car manufacturers to consider simpler plastics that are more easily recycled than complex composites. Keith Freegard, director of Axion, said there aren't currently recycling options for complex composites, and they may be relegated to being burned for energy recovery. He urged companies to consider recycled polymers, including those produced by his company.

The New Zealand government's plan to establish a thin plastic bag recycling collection and recycling infrastructure will fail to divert much plastic, an environmental anthropologist says. Trisia Farrelly of Massey University says efforts need to be taken to reduce bag usage in the first place, because citizens are likely to find it more convenient to throw out bags after one use.

The Basel Action Network (BAN) is calling on the executive secretary of the Basel Convention to force Canada to comply with its convention obligations. Jim Puckett, executive director of BAN, writes that Canada has not complied with the international treaty in allowing shipments of garbage to remain in the Philippines despite being tied to a Canadian exporter.

The European Bioplastics industry is praising a French law mandating plastic bags meant for holding fruit and vegetables be made with biobased plastics and be compostable at home starting in 2017. The law also prohibits plastics with additives that break the bag into smaller pieces but aren't fully biodegradable.

 

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NewsBits from Plastics Recycling Update

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:13
NewsBits

July 29, 2015

More than 600 people listened in on a recent U.S. EPA-hosted webinar focused on plastic bag recycling programs, according to the American Chemistry Council (ACC). The webinar, part of the EPA's Sustainable Materials Management series, included Shari Jackson from the ACC's Flexible Film Recycling Group, Becky Curtis from the Milwaukee, Wis. Department of Public Works and Nina Butler, managing director of Moore Recycling Associates.

The town of Princeton, N.J. is looking to expand collection of plastic bags, reports NJ.com. The Princeton Merchants Association is partnering with retailers and nonprofits to open additional retail collection locations for the bags. The collected bags will be sent to plastics recycling company Trex for use in plastic building materials.

Hawaii will reduce the fee it charges manufacturers, distributors and importers of beverage containers, according to the Honolulu Star Advertiser. The Hawaii Department of Health will reduce the fee from 1.5 cents to 1 cent starting in September. The reduction in the fee, which is separate from the 5 cent deposit consumers pay, was automatically triggered by a falling redemption rate.

 

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Industry and supplier news

Tue, 07/28/2015 - 16:13
Industry and supplier news

July 29, 2015

Plastics recycling firm Global Polymers is now certified to the ISO 9001:2008 certification. For more, click here.

German beverage filling and packaging company Krones has named Michael Andersen as its finance chief. For more, click here.

 

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Repreve expands recycled fiber business

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:43
Repreve expands recycled fiber business

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

Textiles-from-plastics brand Repreve has announced a $10 million expansion of its existing PET bottle recycling plant to help meet increasing demand around the globe.

The company's 50,000-square-foot recycling center in Yadkinville, N.C. will more than double in size as a result of the investment. According to a press release from Repreve's publicly traded parent company, Unifi, the site will expand to 135,000 square feet and be able to process 132 million pounds of recycled PET per year, up from its current annual processing capacity of 72 million pounds.

"We are seeing the brands that we are working with use more and more Repreve," Roger Berrier, Unifi president, said in a release. "This has created an opportunity for us to keep growing."

Repreve fabric is in use by a number of major companies, including Patagonia, Ford and Adidas. The Yadkinville site has been in operation since 2011.

As for ensuring Repreve has enough feedstock to power its enhanced capabilities, Berrier told Plastic Recycling Update the company has "completed our analysis of investing in the backward integration into plastic bottle processing to feed our Repreve business."

"We are currently finalizing all the contract negotiations," Berrier said.

Eddie Ingle, vice president of supply chain and procurement at Unifi, said Repreve may soon be looking into resins beyond PET.

"We are planning in the future to expand beyond the traditional PET waste streams, as well as other polymers, which would of course supply our yarn spinning operations," Ingle said.

The expansion is expected to be completed by the spring of 2016.

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Experts detail keys to film collection success

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:42
Experts detail keys to film collection success

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

While retail locations provide the best collection points for post-consumer film plastics, governments and haulers play a crucial role in ensuring a successful program, according to speakers on a recent webinar.

Local governments have various communications channels through which to communicate with the public, and they have local credibility, said Becky Curtis, recycling assistant at the Department of Public Works in Milwaukee.

"When the community hears from us, it makes a difference in their behavior," she said.

Curtis was participating in a webinar hosted by the U.S. EPA and focused on best practices to improve film recycling. The July 16 webinar also included Shari Jackson, director of film recycling at the American Chemistry Council's (ACC) Plastics Division, and Nina Butler, managing director of Moore Recycling Associates.

The webinar focused on the efforts of the Wrap Recycling Action Program (WRAP), a project started in 2014 by the Flexible Film Recycling Group at ACC. Moore Recycling Associates helps manage the WRAP effort.

The WRAP project partnered with Milwaukee to boost film recycling. In 2014, collection bins and signs were installed at 10 Roundy's Supermarkets locations in Milwaukee and nearby suburbs, Curtis said. Signs told consumers that films should not be placed in curbside bins and gave examples of the types of films to be deposited in store collection bins.

In addition, 4,000 fliers were sent to the stores to be placed in customers' bags at check-out, she said. Stores already commonly communicate with customers using that method, so it was easy to incorporate the fliers into the process. Customer surveys showed the project increased awareness about where – and which types of – films can be recycled, Curtis said.

WRAP counts among its partners four retailers, one state government, 20 local governments/communities and two materials recovery facilities, Jackson said.

"Success really depends on state and municipal governments becoming more engaged and involved," she said.

Across the country, 18,000 stores accept films for recycling, Jackson said.

The U.S. recovery rate for plastic bags, wraps and sacks was about 13.5 percent in 2013, according to EPA estimates.

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Look into the future of resin pricing at Plastics Recycling 2016

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:41
Look into the future of resin pricing at Plastics Recycling 2016

July 22, 2015

The plastics recycling industry's most pivotal gathering is headed to New Orleans next February. Register now to make sure your business gets a big boost in the Big Easy.

The February 2016 gathering of top plastics recycling executives will be the 11th iteration of the conference. Plastics Recycling 2015 welcomed more than 1,500 attendees from 32 countries, and a packed exhibit hall featured nearly 200 leading companies. Expect even more education, networking and inspiration in New Orleans.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and find out more about exhibiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET pellet prices fall slightly

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:40
PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET pellet prices fall slightly

July 22, 2015

Recycled PET clear FDA pellets sold mid-July at 70 to 73 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast and other U.S. locations, down 1 cent per pound from the beginning of the month.

Recycled PET clear bottle grade and food grade sheet regrind was also down 1 cent per pound, with business done at 49 to 50 cents per pound FOB Midwest.

Post-consumer PET pellets still commanded at least a nickel more than U.S.-produced prime bottle/packaging grade PET, which was reported at 65 to 69 cents per pound on a delivered Midwest basis. Also in the prime PET market last week, imports of packaging grade were booked at 55 to 59 cents per pound, delivered U.S. locations.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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New Zealand grants fund film collections, recycling facility

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:39
New Zealand grants fund film collections, recycling facility

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

The New Zealand government will fund efforts to create a plastic film recycling infrastructure while avoiding bag bans or fees.

The island country of 4.5 million people currently has no film recycling program.

Environment Minister Nick Smith announced the government will provide a $700,000 ($465,000 U.S. dollars) grant to the Packaging Forum and a $510,000 ($339,00 USD) grant to plastics recycling company Astron Plastics Group. The money comes from the Waste Minimisation Fund.

Funding to the Packaging Forum, which operates voluntary stewardship programs, will help establish collection points over the next three years at retail locations. Films will be picked up by a program called REDcycle, which currently runs collections in Australia. Initially, bales will be shipped to Australia for recycling, until facilities can be constructed in New Zealand to recycle them, according to the Packaging Forum.

The long-term objective will be to have drop-off locations within 12 miles of 70 percent of the New Zealand population, Smith said.

Lyn Mayes, manager of the Public Place Recycling Scheme, a stewardship program under the Packaging Forum umbrella, stated in a press release the public will be able to drop off a range of films — "basically anything made of plastic which can be scrunched into a ball."

The government's grant to Astron Plastics Group will help enable recycling of up to 2,200 tons of soft plastics per year at a facility in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city. With facilities in Australia and New Zealand, Astron specializes in recycling HDPE, LDPE and PP.

"We have well-established recycling infrastructure at our Auckland premises but are limited in terms of our ability to process contaminated soft plastic," Steve Mead, Astron business manager, told Plastics Recycling Update. "The government funding will be used to procure and install a MAS DRD (dry-cleaning) system so that we can pre-clean the post-consumer plastic bag material prior to our normal recycling processes (extrusion, melt filtration, degassing, pelletizing). We will then use the recycled resin to extrude sheeting products such as cable cover and flat sheet."

Environment Minister Smith, a member of the governing center-right National Party, said the funding strategy "is a more sensible approach than a ban or a compulsory levy on just plastic shopping bags."

The country's left-wing Green Party supported the recycling plan but said more needs to be done to reduce plastic bag usage.

“We still need a levy on plastic bags and to move towards an outright ban on their use – like in Australia where most states either have a ban or a levy on flimsy single-use plastic bags," Green Party spokeswoman and Member of Parliament Denise Roche stated in a press release.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:38
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

The British Plastics Federation calls a department store chain's decision to halt plastic water bottle sales "misguided," and a city in the UAE looks to move toward zero waste.

The British Plastics Federation is criticizing London's iconic department store chain Selfridges for its decision to stop selling water in plastic bottles. The U.K. plastics trade association said recycling is the key to preventing litter, not "indiscriminately banning products." Selfridges said its decision would remove roughly 400,000 plastic bottles per year from it stores.

Surrey County, England could save money for frontline services if every resident recycled one additional plastic container a week, county leaders said. The Surrey County Council says the jurisdiction could save the equivalent of $324,000 a year if every adult recycled just one additional bottle a week.

The Australian packaging industry is considering cutting its 70 percent recycling goal, because new calculations show the recycling rate is worse than previously thought, according to The Sydney Morning Herald. New estimates of plastics imports led to a revised recycling rate calculation significantly below the goal – one expert put the adjusted recycling rate at 29 percent.

Sharjah, part of the United Arab Emirates, aims to be the first Arab city to send zero waste to landfill. The Sharjah Environment Co. plans to open two recycling facilities: one recycling plastics and the other cardboard, according to The National.

 

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NewsBits from Plastics Recycling Update

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:36
NewsBits

July 22, 2015

Chicago's ban on plastic bags is set to begin Aug. 1, but according to an article in the Chicago Sun-Times plastic bags won't disappear altogether. Under the city's ban, which passed in May 2014, retailers and grocers are permitted to provide customers with slightly thicker reusable plastic bags and companies such as Target and Jewel-Osco are planning to do just that.

A 3-D printer capable of using recycled resins in the manufacturing of new products could be headed for outer space in the not-so-distant future, reports the Christian Science Monitor. The maker of the R3DO printer, Made in Space, says the literal product launch could occur within the next 12 to 16 months and represents a key step in providing space crews with the ability to both manage their waste and produce timely products and parts during space missions.

A feather-ruffling story appearing last month in the Washington Post on the state of the recycling industry has been taken to task by Mother Jones magazine. In an article written by journalist Luke Whelan, four "big recycling myths" perpetuated by the original piece are considered and challenged, including the role plastics packaging has played in the current "crisis."

A judge rejected a request by the Natural Resources Defense Council to intervene in the legal fight over New York City's decision to ban expanded polystyrene food-service products. Meanwhile, more than 1,000 business owners have signed a petition calling on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to reverse the administration's decision to ban expanded polystyrene food-service products, according to the Restaurant Action Alliance. In its latest press release, the Restaurant Action Alliance, a group led by Dart Container Corp., says the city's decision hurts small businesses.

 

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Study finds plastics misdirected at MRFs

Wed, 07/15/2015 - 09:17
Study finds plastics misdirected at MRFs

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 15, 2015

Just because a wide array of plastic packaging makes it into a curbside cart or bin doesn't mean it'll make it into a bale. Up-to-date sortation equipment, as well as recycling-friendly product design and consumer best practices, can help improve the chances, a study finds.


The MRF Material Flow Study, conducted by Ann Arbor, Mich.-based Resource Recycling Systems (RRS), suggests materials recovery facilities (MRFs) today lose anywhere from 3 to 12 percent of incoming plastic packaging to the paper stream. Some products increasingly accepted in curbside programs are particularly hard to detect and sort, the study points out, with the average "loss rate" at 29 percent for plastic clamshells and 18 percent for cartons.

"For the MRFs that receive the material, it is not always easy to keep sorting technologies and techniques on pace with this expanding mix," the report states.

The study was funded by the American Chemistry Council, the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers, the Carton Council, the Foodservice Packaging Institute and the National Association for PET Container Resources. It was prepared with the help of Reclay StewardEdge and Moore Recycling Associates.

To complete the study, a variety of food-service packaging products, including containers, cartons and cups, were "seeded" into the incoming streams of five U.S. MRFs. The MRFs, four single-stream facilities and one dual-stream facility ranging in throughput from 10 to 35 tons per hour, were assessed based on how well existing systems managed to effectively separate plastic from paper products.

The MRFs that managed to separate materials most effectively were those that had a sufficient number of well-maintained disc screens. While two of the five MRFs lost 12 percent of plastics to the paper stream, the study points out one MRF achieved just a 3 percent loss rate and did so due to an "adequate number of screens for the incoming volume and material type." In addition, a "significant improvement" was achieved by the two MRFs with the highest loss rates once existing screens were maintenanced.

Optical sortation systems were also noted as a key factor to aiding separation and recovery of commingled recyclables.

On the design and consumer level, the study finds that the form of recyclables entering MRFs has "a strong influence on the loss of packaging to the paper stream." The packaging types with the lowest loss rates – plastic bottles, cups and containers – were round, while lightweight and crushable products, such as clamshells and cartons, more often ended up the wrong stream. By flattening plastic items, consumers can inadvertently cause a MRF to sort the material into the paper stream, the study concluded.

"The study found that three-dimensional objects (packages in their original form) versus two-dimensional (flattened/crushed objects) have a higher likelihood of making it through the system to the appropriate container lines and bales," RRS CEO Jim Frey said in a press release. "This is not only a helpful finding but an actionable one which illustrates that even everyday actions in the home can help boost recovery."

By product, plastic bottles had the lowest loss rate, at 5 percent, followed by plastic cups, at 10 percent, and plastic containers, at 12 percent.

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Curbside EPS collection comes to Nova Scotia county

Wed, 07/15/2015 - 09:17
Curbside EPS collection comes to Nova Scotia county

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 15, 2015

A county in Nova Scotia is leveraging an industry grant to open the door to accepting expanded polystyrene in its curbside recycling program.

Colchester County, with a population of about 50,000 residents, will move forward with the addition, thanks to a $50,000 grant from the Foam Recycling Coalition.

The grant will allow residents and commercial outlets to add EPS, including egg cartons and meat trays, to their recycling bins.

"Colchester demonstrated to us a strong desire and commitment to recycle foam, which is exactly what we're looking for from our grant winners," Lynn Dyer, president of the Foodservice Packaging Institute, which houses the coalition, stated in a press release. "In particular, their customer communications and outreach plans will highlight how easy it is to recycle and process foam."

The county will use the money to upgrade its materials recovery facility and purchase equipment densifying EPS so it can be efficiently transported to reclaimers.

"Although it has long been recognized that polystyrene products are a valuable commodity, the expense of shipping a product to market that is mostly air has deterred the recycling of this material," Wayne Wamboldt, director of waste management for Colchester County, stated in the press release. "Now, with recent developments in densifying equipment, it is possible to get recycled polystyrene material to markets in a cost effective manner."

The county will be among the first to recycle EPS in the province. Kings County became the first county in the province to offer curbside EPS collections when it launched a program in November 2014.

Across Canada, 45 municipalities provide curbside collections for foam, according to homeforfoam.com, a Dart Container Corp. website. Halifax, by far the largest city in Nova Scotia, tells its residents to throw EPS in the garbage.

Colchester County is the first Foam Recycling Coalition grant recipient outside the U.S.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE prices increase

Wed, 07/15/2015 - 09:17
PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE prices increase

July 15, 2015

Prices for many recycled resins were unchanged in the second week of July as summer markets quieted. But HDPE post-consumer natural (dairy) scrap prices consolidated higher on tight supply, with business done at 39 to 40 cents per pound FOB east of the Rockies, up from the 35 to 40 cents per pound range reported at the very beginning of July.

Some see tighter supply of natural material and attribute it to less municipality sorting from curbside collection. This has resulted in a greater supply of post-consumer Z bales, which are a mixture of HDPE natural and mixed-color bottles. Z bales sold recently for 39 cents per pound FOB east of the Rockies.

In the prime market during the first week of July, market participation was limited and U.S. Gulf polyethylene spot prices were mostly lower. For July prime contracts, support for a 5 cents per pound increase appeared to be fading.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here.

 

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