Plastics Recycling Update Magazine

Updated: 10 hours 54 min ago

Plastics exporter slammed again over Philippines shipment

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:30
Plastics exporter slammed again over Philippines shipment

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

A Canadian exporter is being accused of continuing to send containers full of trash to the Philippines.

According to the nonprofit watchdog group Basel Action Network (BAN), Chronic Inc. recently sent 48 containers of household waste marked as recycled plastic to the Port of Manilla. BAN, an environmental watchdog group based in Seattle, called attention last year to a similar shipment of 50 containers of material tied to Chronic, the Whitby, Ontario-based firm. That shipment, BAN says, remains at the Port of Manilla unclaimed.

Canada and the Philippines, as signatories to the Basel Convention, are prohibited from sending household waste to one another without written consent from both governments. BAN says such consent was not provided to Chronic.

In addition, BAN argues the Canadian government is required to take back all 98 containers and "prosecute the exporter criminally."

Despite pressure from BAN and others, the Canadian government has thus far referred to the issue as a "private commercial matter," the Toronto Star reported on May 20.

After initially denying the first reported shipment of household waste, Chronic owner Jim Makris has not responded to various requests for comment by the media, including Resource Recycling.

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Major US school districts abandon EPS plates

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:29
Major US school districts abandon EPS plates

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

More than 2 million K-12 students across the country will begin eating their meals on compostable fiber plates, instead of those made from expanded polystyrene.

The following school districts are switching from EPS plates to fiber ones made from 100 percent post-industrial fiber: New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami-Dade, Dallas and Orlando. Those districts make up the Urban School Food Alliance.

The move is expected to remove 225 million EPS trays per year from landfills, according to the Alliance.

"Shifting from polystyrene trays to compostable plates will allow these cities to dramatically slash waste sent to landfills, reduce plastics pollution in our communities and oceans, and create valuable compost that can be re-used on our farms," Mark Izeman, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), stated in a press release. NRDC is a nonprofit partner of the Alliance.

EPS has come under fire in some jurisdictions because it isn't widely recycled. Starting July 1, New York City's ban on EPS food-service products goes into effect. That ban includes foam plates used by schools.

All New York schools are expected to have the fiber plates by the end of the month, while other school districts should have full use by next school year, Alliance spokeswoman Tatum Wan said.

The fiber plates are manufactured in Waterville, Maine by Huhtamaki North America. The molded-fiber round plates, made from post-industrial newsprint, are FDA-approved, according to a press release.

The company designed the plates after the Alliance sent it specifications, Wan said. EPS trays average about 4 cents each, and the compostable replacements cost 12 cents each, according to the press release. By combining their purchasing leverage through the Alliance, the six school districts are buying the fiber plates for about 5 cents each.

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Plastics-to-fuel group reaches out to state officials

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:29
Plastics-to-fuel group reaches out to state officials

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

If all non-recycled plastics in the U.S. were converted to oil, the effort would generate enough transportation fuel to power nearly 9 million cars per year.

That's according to a video explaining and touting the benefits of plastics-to-fuel technology. The video, "Plastics-to-Fuel: Creating Energy from Non-Recycled Plastics," is from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance (PTOTA).

The video is accompanied by a guide, "Regulatory Treatment of Plastics-to-Fuel Facilities," and a fact sheet, intended to influence government regulators. The guide calls on state officials to regulate plastics-to-fuel facilities as manufacturers of products, not as solid waste disposal facilities, and to reward public waste system operators with diversion credits for sending materials to plastics-to-fuel facilities.

“Plastics-to-fuel technologies complement recycling by converting non-recycled plastics into useful commodities,” Craig Cookson, director of sustainability and recycling for ACC’s Plastics Division, stated in a press release. “Plastics are a valuable resource that should be kept out of landfills, and plastics-to-fuel technologies can help us do that.”

The conversion technology, called pyrolysis, can turn post-consumer plastics into fuels and other petroleum-based feedstocks for manufacturing.

The Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance includes Agilyx Corporation (Beaverton, Ore.), Cynar Plc (London), RES Polyflow (Akron, Ohio), Americas Styrenics (The Woodlands, Texas), Sealed Air (Charlotte, N.C.) and Tetra Tech (Pasadena, Calif.).

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Toronto expands program to include most films

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:28
Toronto expands program to include most films

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

Starting July 1, residents of Toronto will be allowed to put a wide variety of plastic film items in their curbside recycling bins.

Toronto's curbside program, which already accepts plastic retail bags for recycling, will soon include sandwich, milk and bread bags and newspaper bags along with dry cleaning bags and diaper packaging. It will not accept biodegradable, black or laminated film.

Adding any type of film to a single-stream recycling program is relatively rare. Materials recovery facilities (MRFs) tend to view the material as challenging to sort and process due to its tendency to clog machinery, as well as raising pre-baled film storage capacity issues.

According to a report from the city, which can be viewed here, a "stable market for the expanded list of plastic film materials has now been established" and all film will be recovered by Canada Fibers' Toronto MRF.

The City expects just under 4,000 tons of film, or approximately 38 to 46 percent of single household generation of the material, will be recovered as a result of the program's expansion. It also expects the city's overall diversion rate to increase by 0.35 percent.

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Calling all recycling innovators

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:28
Calling all recycling innovators

May 27, 2015

Submit your innovative ideas for improving the plastics recycling industry today.

The 2015 Recycling Innovators Forum and is now accepting entries from people and organizations with actionable ideas to advance recycling. The deadline for submissions is June 1, 2015.

This fall's Forum marks the third year for the recycling innovation event.

Up to 10 finalists will receive travel and lodging scholarships to attend the Resource Recycling Conference, to be held Sept. 28-30 in Indianapolis. The finalists will present their ideas to a panel of judges and an audience of industry decision-makers and investors at the Recycling Innovators Forum, held on Sept. 28 in conjunction with the conference. Judges will select a winner to receive a $20,000 prize to help move their innovation forward.

Resource Recycling magazine, sister publication to Plastics Recycling Update, will also feature the winning ideas in online and print stories.

In 2014, one winner was the Healthcare Plastics Recycling Council, which aims to build stakeholder coordination around recovering and recycling plastic material from hospitals. Those receiving honorable mentions included Creative Plastics Technology, which creates moldings from mixed plastics otherwise headed to landfill, and Zzyzx Polymers, which used a continuous mechanochemical compatibilization to process and optimize the use of mixed plastics.

The third annual Recycling Innovators Forum is made possible thanks to major sponsorships from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics Division, Waste Management and Resource Recycling, Inc., with additional support from the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries and the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers.

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<i>PetroChem Wire</i>: Recycled Nylon 6 and 66 pellets strengthen

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:27
PetroChem Wire: Recycled Nylon 6 and 66 pellets strengthen

Month 27, 2015

Recycled Nylon 6 and Nylon 66 prices are stronger in late May on proposed virgin nylon price increases.

Nylon 6 post-industrial black pellets were done at 78 to 80 cents per pound last week, while Nylon 66 pellets sold at 81 to 83 cents per pound, both FOB U.S. East Coast and both up 1 cent per pound from the middle of May. Nylon 6 flake material was also higher. Nylon 6 regrind prices rose 1 to 2 cents per pound for the week ended May 22.

U.S. producers of prime nylon resin are looking for a total price increase for May and June deliveries of 7 cents per pound, which would bring prime prices above $1 per pound. Higher crude oil prices are being cited for the proposed nylon price increases.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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NewsBits

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:26
NewsBits

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

The California Assembly approved a ban on plastic microbeads in personal care products. The ban, described by supporters as the strongest in the nation, passed the Assembly 59-12. The bill, AB 888, now heads to the Senate. If enacted into law, the ban would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

State officials have announced the launch of a competition in Michigan aimed at increasing the state's recycling rate. Called Recycle By Design, the competition is the result of a partnership between the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, the Michigan Recycling Coalition and IMG Rebel. Michigan's 15 percent recycling rate lags behind that of its neighboring states and the national average.

Chinese authorities plan to crack down on companies illegally buying, selling or renting government licenses to import plastic scrap, government officials said at a May 18 conference in the city of Guangzhou, as reported by Plastics News. Imported plastics increased in 2014, after the 2013 launch of Operation Green Fence, the Chinese customs enforcement effort. In the second half of this year, customs officials and environmental regulators will heighten their focus on the proper use of licenses and administrative issues.

Plastic beverage container recycling markets may grow an average of 3.9 percent each year through 2019, according to one forecast. The "Global Recycle Market for Plastic Bottle Industry 2015-2019" report said the the food packaging industry has propelled the growth.

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Dell eyes growth in recycled plastic use

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:42
Dell eyes growth in recycled plastic use

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

May 20, 2015

Texas-based computer giant Dell has set its sights on using more recycled plastic, including plastics recovered from scrap electronics.

"We expect to see it grow over the coming years," Maureen Martinez, Dell's senior manager of environmental affairs, told Plastics Recycling Update. "We're trying to be a good steward of the environment and we understand that material usage is a big part of that."

As Dell has rolled out take-back programs around the world, Martinez says the company has also recognized the potential for reusing a variety of materials in new products. In 2014, the company used slightly more than 10 million pounds of recycled plastic, including offering a variety of desktops and monitors with recycled plastics from recovered electronics, or e-plastics. Dell wants to use 50 million pounds of recovered plastic by 2020.

"We're actually well on our way to meeting and exceeding that 2020 goal," Martinez said.

While initial concerns were raised regarding the performance and appearance of post-consumer resin being incorporated into new products, thus far Dell has been able to ramp up use. What's more, Martinez says cost has been a relatively on par with using virgin plastics.

"For the most part it tends to be pretty cost-neutral," Martinez said.

Not all electronic devices, however, are ideal sources of recovered material, Dell has found. According to Martinez, lighter and thinner devices use "plastics with a much higher performance requirement and so it is more challenging in that area to drive the introduction of recycled content."

In addition to increasing use of recycled plastic when possible, Martinez's team is currently looking into the viability of using additional recycled materials, though she would not offer specifics.

"Hopefully in the coming months that's something we'll be able to talk about," Martinez said.

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<i>Plastics Recycling 2016</i>: Best in the business

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:42
Plastics Recycling 2016: Best in the business

May 20, 2015

Next February marks the 11th iteration of the Plastics Recycling Conference, and the event's staying power is a testament to the innovative opportunities and business-boosting environment offered at the conference every year.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is produced by Resource Recycling, Inc., the publisher of Plastics Recycling Update and other recycling journals. The editorial staff analyzes and investigates plastics recycling like no other organization. And that means the Plastics Recycling Conference is able to bring fresh, independent and objective viewpoints that guide attendees into the sector's current and future profit centers.

In addition, our staff's relationships with individual attendees, recycling firms of all sizes and hotel and logistics groups give the Plastics Recycling Conference an edge when it comes to personalized service, competitive pricing and networking needs.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and get all the facts on exhbiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.


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Phoenix Technologies adds washing operation

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:41
Phoenix Technologies adds washing operation

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

May 20, 2015

Bowling Green, Ohio-based Phoenix Technologies has invested $18 million to wash and clean PET flake on its own.

"We think it will give us a little bit more control over the quality consistency of the raw material," Lori Carson, Phoenix's director of commercial operations, said in an extended interview with Plastics Recycling Update. "As the market gets more demanding, which it certainly is when it comes to making your material as close to virgin as you can, it appears to be the right time for us to control the starting process."

Phoenix, which is one of the largest rPET producers in the country, has traditionally sourced clean flake to feed its Bowling Green, Ohio headquarters.

The company's multimillion-dollar washing line, which will be active by the end of 2015 and located near the company's headquarters, will receive and clean bales of PET bottles and containers. Curbside-generated material will make up 95 percent of supply, Carson said. That curbside material is generally sourced within "a 10-hour radius" of the company, she added.

Once cleaned, PET flake that's been through the washing operation will be sent to the company's main rPET manufacturing plant, which will also continue to purchase some clean flake from outside suppliers.

The company has the ability to process about 85 million pounds of PET per year, the majority of which will be cleaned first by the company.

Carson said the percentage of PET found within a typical bale accepted by Phoenix is "somewhere in the mid-60s." She added, "We know some bales will be worse, and we hope that some bales will be better."

She also said the company continues to work with suppliers to improve bale quality and looks to the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR) and the National Association for PET Container Resources (NAPCOR) for continued guidance on the issue.

The widely reported impact of low oil prices on the plastics recycling industry has had an effect on Phoenix, Carson said. "The last eight months have been a little challenging," Carson said. "And we're making plans as if the market is going to stay the same as it is right now. For us, the question is: How can impact our process and our economics to allow us to be as competitive as possible right now?"

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Grant aims to push forward EPS recycling in Denver

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:40
Grant aims to push forward EPS recycling in Denver

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 20, 2015

A $45,000 grant from the Foam Recycling Coalition will enable a Denver-area company to begin processing expanded polystyrene and possibly open the door to curbside collection of the material.

Alpine Waste and Recycling of Commerce City, Colo. will use the money, provided by a Foodservice Packaging Institute initiative, to purchase a densifier to compact EPS into bricks for more efficient transportation.  The densifer will be located at the company's materials recovery facility (MRF).

The company, which has 80 collection vehicles, a MRF, composting operations and a landfill, is the first recipient of grant dollars from the Foam Recycling Coalition. A segment of the Foodservice Packaging Institute (FPI), the coalition formed in 2014 to provide resources to help drive recycling of post-consumer EPS.

"Out of the dozens of applications from the U.S. and Canada, we were particularly impressed with Alpine’s thoughtfulness and plans for the future," Lynn Dyer, president of FPI, stated in a press release. "Alpine recognized the value and benefit of adding polystyrene foam to their already successful recycling program."

Alpine will become the first company in the Denver area to provide foam recycling, according to FPI. It will accept both food-service and protective-packaging foams.

Alpine's Altogether Recycling program was the first in the state to accept plastics Nos. 3-7 and cartons, according to Alpine. The company operates the second-largest MRF in the state, processing more than 6,000 tons of materials per month, the website states.

FPI plans to announce more recipients of grants through its North America grant program later this spring.

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Video pushes streamlined vocab in plastics recycling

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:40
Video pushes streamlined vocab in plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 20, 2015

Recycling professionals and communities nationwide are being encouraged to use a lingua franca when it comes to plastics recycling.

An animated video backed by the American Chemistry Council builds on last year's introduction of the Plastics Recycling Terms & Tools, a set of consistent terms and resources recycling programs can use when communicating with the public.

For example, instead of telling consumers to recycle plastics No. 1-7, the terms recommend telling them to recycle "plastic bottles and containers," with the option of providing a more detailed explanation.

"The terms in use today are, at best, inconsistent and often contradictory, which negatively impacts the ability to communicate what plastics are accepted for recycling," a Plastics Recycling Outreach Terms document states. "A set of common outreach terms (a glossary or lexicon) and royalty-free images helps communities communicate more effectively to residents."

The terms and tools project also includes software to help programs create their own outreach flyers.

Moore Recycling Associates oversees the terms and tools, which are sponsored by the American Chemistry Council's Plastics Division. They were created with guidance from an advisory committee with representatives from multiple recycling stakeholders.

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<i>PetroChem Wire</i>: Recycled PET price rises

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:39
PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET price rises

May 20, 2015

Recycled PET bottle-grade pellet prices rose in the first half of May as tight spot prime PET supply encouraged end-users with flexibility to substitute rPET for prime.

FDA-grade clear rPET pellet sold around 70 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast, up 2 cents per pound from the beginning of the month.

Demand from the non-woven and home furnishings sectors is also driving clear filament fiber flake rPET prices higher, with prices for that grade of flake material up a couple of cents to 33 to 34 cents per pound.

In the prime PET market, U.S. producers are seeking increases of 5 cents per pound in May and 2 to 3 cents per pound in June. Spot prices were 65 to 67 cents per pound, delivered by railcar Midwest in mid-May.

Meanwhile, a decision by the U.S. Commerce Department's International Trade Administration (ITA) on whether anti-dumping duties will be imposed on U.S. PET imports from Oman, India and China has been delayed from early June to Aug. 11. A similar decision regarding U.S. PET imports from Canada is still expected in mid-August.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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NewsBits

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:38
NewsBits

May 20, 2015

The Palm Desert, Calif. City Council voted unanimously to continue its ban on single-use plastic bags, according to California vs. Big Plastic, a coalition that supports bag bans. Palm Desert, a city of roughly 50,000 people adjunct to Palm Springs generated around 22 million plastic bags per year before the ban went into effect, and an estimated 5 percent to 10 percent were reused or recycled, according to a press release from California vs. Big Plastic.

New York City has launched the "Bring Your Own Bag" campaign in an effort to encourage residents to bring reusable bags to the grocery store. According to city officials, 10 billion single-use bags are collected by the Department of Sanitation every year and it costs $12.5 million to landfill them.

Starting June 1, Toronto will expand the list of soft plastic materials it accepts for recycling at the curb. The move is expected to yield an additional 3,858 tons of material per year, a 2 percent increase in materials collected. In addition to mixed rigids and beverage containers, the program accepts EPS and plastic bags.

The California Assembly is scheduled to vote on Friday on a bill banning plastic microbeads in personal care products. The bill, Assembly Bill 888, is described as the toughest ban in the country because it also prohibit beads that degrade in high temperatures. If passed by the Assembly, the bill must still be approved by the Senate and signed by the governor to become law.

 

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Dunkin' Donuts ditches EPS recycling program

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 09:46
Dunkin' Donuts ditches EPS recycling program

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 13, 2015

Dunkin' Donuts has halted its in-store foam-cup recycling program, citing low usage, contamination issues and a pending transition away from expanded polystyrene.

That's according to the latest sustainability report from Massachusetts-based Dunkin' Brands, which owns Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins.

"While we have pulled all recycling units from our company-owned restaurants, we are using lessons learned and best practices to develop our new single-stream recycling program, which we expect to launch in our company-owned stores in 2015," the report states.

The Dunkin' Donuts in-store foam recycling program started in early 2013 as a pilot project at five Massachusetts locations and then spread in 2014 to all company-owned restaurants, numbering about two dozen (the vast majority of locations are owned by franchisees). The goal was a 5 percent recycling rate at the company-owned locations by 2015.

Very few cups made it to the recycling bins, however, because most of the restaurant's beverages are consumed as carry-out items, according to the sustainability report. The company also encountered problems with commingling of trash and recyclable materials.

Finding an alternative cup

In addition to developing a single-stream recycling program, Dunkin' Donuts is still working to transition from EPS cups to a material more widely recycled. It did not meet its goal of rolling out a new cup by 2014 or 2015, according to the report. The company now hopes to shift to an alternative cup by the end of 2015.

Dunkin' Donuts is a major purchaser of both EPS and PP. In 2014, its U.S. locations purchased 10,101 tons of EPS, a 1 percent increase over the previous year, and 11,722 tons of PP, a 15.7 percent increase over 2013, according to the report.

"Our journey to find an alternative to the foam cup has spanned more than seven years, during which we have examined every commercially available cup and material," writes CEO Nigel Travis in the report. "Based on our efforts to date, we believe recyclable cups are the best available alternative to foam and have tested a No. 5 polypropylene plastic recyclable cup in several communities in the U.S."

Dunkin' Donuts has worked with Indiana-based Berry Plastics on the PP cup. However, the cup lid isn't accepted in many municipal recycling programs and has been criticized by franchisees and customers, the report states.

"We expect to have a new, recyclable lid available for market testing within the next 12 to 18 months," the report states.

Dunkin' Brands has nearly 19,000 Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins locations in 60 countries.

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California indicts five in $14 million deposit fraud case

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 09:45
California indicts five in $14 million deposit fraud case

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 13, 2015

Five California residents have been indicted for defrauding the state's beverage container deposit program an estimated $14 million.

A two-year investigation led by the state's Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) and the California Department of Justice unearthed the fraudulent operation, which, according to the state, hinged on redeeming out-of-state containers at various southern California recycling centers.

About 28 percent of the out-of-state containers were PET bottles, CalRecycle spokesperson Mark Oldfield said.

A total of 24 centers responsible for taking back the containers have been removed from the state's beverage container deposit program, CalRecycle has announced. Alleged organizer Gonzalo Rodriguez and three others are awaiting trial in a Kern County, California jail, while a fifth party "remains at large."

"By putting fraudsters out of business or behind bars, California eliminates any future harm those individuals could do to the recycling fund," Oldfield said. He added it also "deters those who would consider it."

In recent years, CalRecycle has made it a priority to clamp down on potential instances of fraud. The effort, which is being formally aided by the California Department of Justice, was highlighted during a recent webinar as an important driver of the program's renewed solvency.

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Plastics Recycling 2016: Get your brand in front of the industry

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 09:43
Plastics Recycling 2016: Get your brand in front of the industry

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 13, 2015

Sponsorship and exhibitor packages are now available for the leading North American gathering of plastics recycling professionals.

By integrating your company into the action at Plastics Recycling 2016, you'll be ensuring name recognition and brand cache among plastics reclaimers, brokers, packaging executives, government officials and other sustainability leaders. Be sure to act quickly to get ahead of your competitors in terms of exhibit hall placement and sponsorship choices.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and get all the facts on exhbiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.

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Envision and Ecoplast undergo restructuring

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 09:42
Envision and Ecoplast undergo restructuring

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 13, 2015

Consolidated Container Co, which recently acquired two major suppliers of recycled resins, plans to make structural and personnel changes at the companies.

Rigid plastic packaging maker Consolidated Container Co. (CCC) acquired Envision Plastics LLC and Ecoplast Corp. in June 2014. Now the Atlanta-based company plans to move the Ecoplast business under the Envision umbrella, the company announced.

The personnel changes involve a number of industry veterans.

Two executives are leaving the company: Jose Perez, Ecoplast sales and procurement leader, and Scott Booth, who has led Envision and Ecoplast since the acquisition.

On the hiring front, Mark Shafer recently joined CCC as vice president and general manager for the newly combined Envision Plastics business. Shafer has held many general management and business development roles, with nine years spent at Georgia-Pacific.

In addition, Tamsin Ettefagh’s responsibilities as vice president of sales have been expanded to include both the Envision and Ecoplast product lines. And Mylinda Jacobsen will assume responsibility for the supply and trading of raw materials for both Envision and Ecoplast products.

Envision recycles post-consumer HDPE into various resins, including EcoPrime, the only food-grade recycled HDPE approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to CCC. Envision also produces the Prisma color-sorted resin, natural resin and mixed color utility-grade resin.

Ecoplast offers custom-compounded recycling streams.

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Some packaging struggles to get from bathroom to bin

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 09:41
Some packaging struggles to get from bathroom to bin

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 13, 2015

Consumers are much more likely to recycle plastic shampoo and conditioner containers than deodorant packaging, a survey shows.

The March survey, commissioned by Unilever, showed people tend to divert materials from the kitchen more often than materials from the bathroom. But it also showed disparities in which bathroom products are likely to make it to the bin.

While roughly two-thirds of people said they usually or always recycle hair care, body wash and lotion containers, a small percentage said they do the same for aerosol hair care cans (37 percent) or deodorant (41 percent).

Overall, the survey found 80 percent of adults usually or always recycle packaging from the kitchen, while 65 percent do the same for bathroom products.

Unilever launched a public awareness advertising campaign called "Rinse. Recycle. Reimagine." The campaign dovetails with the "I Want to Be Recycled" effort by Keep America Beautiful and the Ad Council.

"Our scale and sheer volume of products present in American bathrooms puts us in a unique position to take on this issue," Gina Boswell, executive vice president of personal care at Unilever North America, stated in a press release. "The average American household has eight products in plastic bottles in their bathroom. If we're able to inspire those millions of people to recycle their empty body wash or lotion bottles, this small action can bring about transformational change."

The online survey, conducted by KRC Research, was conducted March 9-23 among 5,516 adults across the U.S.


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PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE dairy price strengthens

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 09:40
PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE dairy price strengthens

May 13, 2015

HDPE post-consumer dairy natural pellet and flake prices rose 3 to 3.5 cents per pound in early May on the back of higher bale prices.

Dairy repro business was confirmed done the first week of May just above 60 cents per pound FOB Southern U.S. and at 65 to 67 cents per pound delivered east of the Rockies. HDPE dairy flake pricing increased by the same amount, and the spread between flake and pellets held at 10 cents per pound.

HDPE natural bales from bottles shot up a total of 3.5 cents per pound from the end of April through the first week of May to reach 33 to 35 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast.

In the prime polyethylene market, U.S. Gulf spot blow mold HDPE moved up 3 cents per pound from April 30 to May 7, reaching 67 cents per pound.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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