Plastics Recycling Update Magazine

Updated: 16 hours 45 min ago

Plastics-to-oil plants could face more scrutiny in Oregon

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:50
Plastics-to-oil plants could face more scrutiny in Oregon

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

August 26, 2015

The Portland, Ore.-area government is proposing to regulate plastics-to-oil facilities because of concerns about impacts to neighboring properties.

Metro, which is tasked with managing the solid waste system in Oregon's largest urban area, proposes to require licensing and inspections of a variety of new facility types, including those converting plastics to fuel or oil. Metro already licenses and inspects construction and demolition debris sorting facilities and waste transfer stations.

Roy Brower, Metro solid waste compliance and cleanup director, told Plastics Recycling Update the facilities present various potential issues, including odors and dust. One in the Portland area accepted plastic food wrappings, presenting putrescibility issues, he said.

Regulatory programs should be proactive and work with facilities before issues crop up, Brower said.

The agency also wants to license and inspect materials recovery facilities (MRFs) sorting curbside materials. Brower said a switch to single-stream recycling has contributed to an increase in contamination, and MRFs are now more akin to solid waste processing facilities, raising issues for nearby properties.

"The big change really came when the area initially moved to a roll-cart system (starting around 2005) – that is when the management of recyclables started to have more of the nuisance, health and environmental risks that characterize other parts of the solid waste stream," Brower wrote in an email. "There was no specific incident that triggered Metro’s interest in licensing or inspections – but generally the recognition for Metro to play a larger role in assuring the integrity of the entire solid waste system."

If Metro's elected leaders approve the change, it would then work with the affected facilities and the public to develop administrative procedures, Brower said.

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Harvesting plastics from the agricultural sector

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:47
Harvesting plastics from the agricultural sector

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 26, 2015

Recovering mulch film, pesticide containers, drainage piping and much more was the focus of the Agricultural Plastics Recycling Conference (APRC 2015), held last week in San Diego.

Presentations on a plethora of aspects of the agricultural plastics recycling industry were offered at APRC 2015, the second year the conference was held.

A presentation from Rami Margalit of Netafim, a large producer of polyethylene drip irrigation pipe, addressed one of the largest issues facing ag plastics recycling: high contamination.

Margalit's firm had experience with the use of post-consumer plastics in making thin-wall pipe and found high levels of holes in the finished product, caused by contaminants in the recycled resin pellets. Following that experience, Margalit developed a way to test pellet loads for contamination. The system uses a lab extruder in a filter test, with pellets being put through 80/20 filters. The filters are then examined to determine contamination levels. The firm now tests every load and is encouraging large recycling suppliers to install their own filter-test systems.

In another presentation, Ron Perkins, executive director of the Ag Container Recycling Council (ACRC), offered an update on his 23-year-old nonprofit volunteer alliance of 37 pesticide producers and distributors that partner to recover one-way HDPE pesticides containers in 43 states. The plastics from triple-rinsed or pressure-washed containers are ground at collection sites and then shipped to one of six ACRC-approved end-use markets in the U.S., primarily corrugated pipe producers. ACRC has recovered 160 million pounds over the past 23 years.

Finally, Gene Jones, the head of the regional solid waste and recycling group SWIX offered a look at ag plastics recovery in Florida. According to Jones, farmers in the Sunshine State annually produce 40,000 tons of mulch film and drip pipe or tape and the state is struggling with how to handle this volume. One county offered as an example has more than 50,000 tons sitting in three monofills.

Jones highlighted one firm, FieldClean of Florida, which has developed a technology to pick up and clean film in the agricultural field, perhaps offering a way to recover some of Florida's ag film volumes.

Jones, who also was the conference planner, will present a full international assessment of ag plastics recovery as a speaker at Plastics Recycling 2016, scheduled for February 1-3 in New Orleans.

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Scrap plastics exports see month-to-month drop

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:43
Scrap plastics exports see month-to-month drop

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 26, 2015

While scrap plastics exports are up overall for the first half of 2015, the latest month-to-month levels show a decline in activity.


June, the most recent month for which figures are available, saw a decrease of 8.8 percent from May 2015 export levels, with 451.55 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in June 2015.

When matched against June 2014 levels, however, the volume of plastic scrap exports was up by 11.4 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in June came in at 17.97 cents per pound, down 2.2 percent from its May 2015 standing. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 7.1 percent.

Through the first six months of 2015, at 2.39 billion pounds, the volume of recovered plastics exported was up 2.8 percent from its 2014 year-to-date (YTD) figure. At 18.40 cents per pound, the average price through June was down, however, by 5 percent from its 2014 YTD standing.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET prices under downward pressure

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:42
PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET prices under downward pressure

August 26, 2015

Last week clear rPET flake from high-grade curbside bottles was reported sold at 47 to 48 cents per pound. FDA-sanctioned pellets were holding just above 70 cents per pound.

Spot prime PET prices were also steady last week, with bottle-grade PET delivered by rail to the Midwest reported at 62 to 65 cents per pound. But the prime PET market is under strong downward pressure due to weakening feedstock MEG and PTA prices as well as sharply lower crude prices.

This market scenario is expected to make an impact on vulnerable recycled PET prices too, certainly by September.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Major investment group puts $15 million behind PET recycling firm

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:40
Major investment group puts $15 million behind PET recycling firm

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 26, 2015

Global investment company Franklin Templeton Investments is backing a Beijing-based company that produces PET bottle recycling kiosks.

Plastics News reports the San Mateo, Calif.-based firm invested $15 million in Incom Renewable Resources Recovery.  The company says it recovers 110 million pounds of plastic containers annually and it's the only one in China producing recycled bottle-grade PET chips. 

Its subsidiary, Incom Recycle Co., founded in 2008, makes kiosks that accept PET beverage containers and pay the consumer based on the material's value.  The machines scan the bar code, weigh the container (returning those with too much liquid in them), crush the container and provide credits to the consumer on a card.

Currently, the machines are placed in Beijing subway, bus facilities, schools, malls, office buildings and other public places.  The company also recently launched an on-call, at-home recycling collection service for plastics, paper and appliances.

Founded as Franklin Distributors in 1947, Franklin Templeton is a global investment firm managing assets for people and organizations in 150 countries.

 

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Patent watch

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:39
Patent watch

August 26, 2015

Patent No. 9,089,878, which describes a bottle-cleaning operation that removes labels and other foreign bodies with an abrasive, was given to Meckesheim, Germany-based Herbold Meckesheim GmbH.

A two-phase NIR plastics sortation device is the subject of Patent No. 9,101,963, awarded to Oberburen, Switzerland's Buhler Thermal Processes AG.

The Woodlands, Texas' Americas Styrenics LLC has developed a styrenic resin incorporating recycled polystyrene and was given Patent No. 9,096,698.

Patent Nos. 9,114,551 and 9,114,552 were awarded to Wisconsin Film & Bag, Inc., headquartered in Shawano, Wis. for a system and a method of recycling post-consumer scrap plastic film.

Aetrex Worldwide, Inc., from Teaneck, N.J., was given Patent No. 9,114,580, for a method of making athletic shoes or other goods from recycled materials, in particular, recovered athletic shoes.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database at patft.uspto.gov/.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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NewsBits from Plastics Recycling Update

Tue, 08/25/2015 - 16:37
NewsBits

August 26, 2015

Digitaltrends.com, citing the American Chemistry Council, provided a rundown for consumers on what those numbers mean on their plastics. The hope is to reduce some of the confusion for members of the public.

NASA has created a visualization showing where plastics accumulate in oceans around the world. The Daily Mail covers the release of the video, which is based on data from buoys released into the oceans. The visualization shows huge patches in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans.

In other ocean plastics news, a Chile-based company has set up fishing net collections so the plastic material can be recycled into skateboard and sunglasses. The Boston Herald features the company, Buero, which founded by a Bay State native and supported by the New England Aquarium. The company has set up collection points in Chile but plans to expand to the U.S.

Cities and counties in California continue to ban thin plastic bags, despite a referendum that delayed the July 1, 2015, statewide bag ban, according to advocacy group California vs. Big Plastic. Since then, the city of American Canyon passed a ban. San Diego and several other communities are also considering bans, according to the group.

 

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Current export markets: The good and the ugly

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:57
Current export markets: The good and the ugly

By Jerry Powell, Plastics Recycling Update

August 19, 2015

Several trends are negatively affecting North American export markets for recovered materials, including what appears to be the return of China's Green Fence customs initiative.

The surprise move by the Chinese government to devalue its currency – the yuan – has led to consternation by North American recycling shippers. The devaluation of the yuan makes the U.S. dollar even stronger. Thus, while the government action will make Chinese goods more attractive worldwide, it means that plastic recovered in the U.S. and Canada is more expensive than before devaluation, because such goods are dollar-denominated.

The currency action will spur added Chinese initiatives to acquire more scrap material internally, rather than relying so heavily on North American and European suppliers. Recycling market players fear that additional devaluation steps will further erode import demand by Chinese buyers and will push foreign-trade prices lower.

A second concern of many North American shippers is the resurgence in restrictive actions by Chinese custom inspectors. Some U.S. shippers of secondary materials say they are experiencing enhanced inspections of their loads as the Chinese government once again tightens controls to reduce or eliminate the likelihood of contaminated loads being received. Some U.S. exporters are calling the governmental action “Green Fence II.”

On the positive side, these same exporters say overseas shipping costs are at rock-bottom levels. According to ocean-freight analysts, these attractive container shipping rates reflect the low cost of fuel for shipping lines as well as the impact of a rate war among the major shipping lines.

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Plastics Recycling 2016: Technically the best

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:56
Plastics Recycling 2016: Technically the best

August 19, 2015

Is your company taking bales of PET and turning it into a new product? Are you sorting out colored from natural HDPE? How are you managing engineered scrap plastics containing flame retardants?

Those and other technical concerns will be front and center at the Plastics Recycling Conference, which will be offering a three-session track to address the specific issues confronting operations all along the plastics recovery value chain. Wade into the weeds on technology and technical issues facing plastics recycling operations today and into the future.

In addition to the technical track, the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers will hold one of its two annual Technical Forum gatherings on Monday, Feb. 1. It's free for all attendees of Plastics Recycling 2016.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is taking place Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


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APR makes rigid plastics pitch to grocery industry

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:55
APR makes rigid plastics pitch to grocery industry

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 19, 2015

Grocery store chains could generate significant income by baling and selling their rigid plastic containers, according to a video aimed at grocery leaders.

The training video emphasizes the benefits of baling and selling HDPE and PP rigid containers, as opposed to landfilling them, mixing them in single-stream recycling or stacking and shipping them for recycling. It notes that a grocery chain with 100 outlets could bring in rigid plastics revenues of nearly $120,000 annually.

The video was produced by the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR) in collaboration with Florida-based Publix Super Markets and the American Chemistry Council.

"There is great value in grocery store plastics," Liz Bedard, director of the APR Rigid Plastics Recycling Program, stated in a press release. "The Grocery Store Recycling Project is all about capturing good material for recycling. Baling the material adds good economic value, and we want to make it easy for grocers to see how they can enhance the value of the material by baling it."

The video features practices at Publix, a Southeastern U.S. grocery chain of 1,100 stores that bales its rigid plastics. The video also highlights the financial benefits of using a horizontal baler.

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Sign up for Plastics Recycling Update: Technology Edition

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:54
Sign up for Plastics Recycling Update: Technology Edition

August 19, 2015

A monthly newsletter on the biggest plastics recycling technology news is set to debut Aug. 31.

From the publishers of Plastics Recycling Update, Plastics Recycling Update: Technology Edition will offer readers an exclusive look at processing strides, new equipment and the latest research and innovations in the expanding plastics recycling field.

In the first edition of the newsletter, readers will get an inside look at the equipment in Repreve's $25 million facility expansion, letters of no objection from the FDA and a never-before-seen project aimed at recovering laminated films.

To receive the free monthly newsletter, sign up here.

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Communities in action

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:53
Communities in action

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 19, 2015

A Portland, Ore.-based company has started to accept expanded polystyrene at two drop-off locations, and West Virginia's capital city is making the unconventional move to replace recycling bins with plastic bags.

A MRF operator in the Portland, Ore. area is again accepting expanded polystyrene, but only on the west side of the metropolitan area. Far West Recycling stopped accepting foam after demand from China dropped, but that demand has increased again, reports KGW News. In the meantime, the company moved its densifying equipment to a facility on the western side of the metro area and says it's too expensive to truck it from collection depots in the eastern areas.

The city of South Portland, Maine will consider approving an EPS ban and plastic bag fee ordinance. The mayor of South Portland, population 25,000, said the ordinance would place a 5-cent fee on thin plastic and paper bags, the Portland Press Herald reports. Mayor Linda Cohen wants to give businesses plenty of time to adjust to the changes, particularly the ban on food-service EPS products.

Charleston, W.Va. will switch from recycling bins to plastic bags because the local MRF won't accept wet materials, according to WSAZ.com. The City Council voted to approve the change, with one council member saying that, without the change, the city may find itself with nowhere to take recyclable materials in the future.

The city of Atlanta has launched a partnership with recycling incentive program Recycling Perks, according to the Atlanta Daily World. The program provides residents who recycle curbside materials, including plastic containers and packaging, with discounts at businesses.

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PetroChem Wire: Scrap plastics exports rise in first half of 2015

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:51
PetroChem Wire: Scrap plastics exports rise in first half of 2015

August 19, 2015

For the first six months of 2015, U.S. scrap plastic exports were up 2.5 percent from the first half of 2014 – at 1,090,799 metric tons, compared with 1,063,613 metric tons during the first half of 2014.

That's according to the latest USA Trade Online data. The export report also shows U.S. exports of scrap plastic in June totaled 206,083 metric tons, up 11.6 percent from 184,674 metric tons in June 2014.

A 43 percent rise in exports of "other" plastic scrap in June over June 2014 accounted for most of the increase. This category includes various plastic scrap with the exception of PET.

China is the largest destination of U.S. scrap plastic exports. In June 2015, 95,343 metric tons were exported to China, according to USA Trade Online, a division of the U.S. Census Bureau. That number made up 46.3 percent of the total 206,083 metric tons exported in June. U.S. plastic scrap exports to China in June were up 4.1 percent from June 2014.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:51
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 19, 2015

Two Australian fishermen get up close and personal with plastic marine debris, and the U.K. plastics recycling sector sees some major injections of capital.

Two U.K. companies producing recycled plastic products have received major capital investments, reports letsrecycle.com. Ireland-based OnePlastics Group has invested "a seven-figure sum" in U.K.-based company Straight, which makes waste and recycling containers. In addition, the firm Jayplas has announced it will invest millions of dollars into its packaging division.

The local government covering a vast swath of northern Great Britain has added non-bottle rigid plastics to its collection program. The Highland Council will begin collecting the additional plastics at the end of August, according to the CIWM Journal. Loose plastic bottle tops can also now be included in the curbside mix.

With Kuala Lumpur's plastics recycling rate at only about 5 percent, the local solid waste management company's CEO is urging to public separate materials for recycling. Residents of Malaysia's capital city throw away plastics each year worth the equivalent of $12.3 million, reports the New Strait Times.

If there weren't video or photos, people probably wouldn't believe them. Two young Australian fishermen were approached by a whale in a harbor north of Sydney, and it seemed to want them to remove plastic bags and fishing wire stuck on its head. One of the individuals reached out and removed the plastic waste and it slapped its fin on the water, seemingly out of appreciation, before swimming off, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Two bottled water companies serving the United Arab Emirates have taken meaningful steps to promote plastics recycling. Others? Not so much. That's according to The National, which said that while two companies, Masafi and Al Ain, recycle and encourage recycling among consumers, six other companies either refused to detail their recycling programs or said they had none in place.

 

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NewsBits from Plastics Recycling Update

Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:48
NewsBits

August 19, 2015

While the values of many reclaimed plastics have dropped, they've roughly doubled for clean PP film collected from hospitals. Inforum.com takes a look at a blue wrap recycling programs in the Twin Cities area and how it's been successful in recycling major tonnages of film from hospitals that used to go to landfill.

Oregonians support the doubling of the beverage container deposit from 5 cents to 10 cents, a survey from the Northwest Grocery Association shows. That's according to the Statesman Journal newspaper, which reported 55 percent of poll respondents support the increase. Under Oregon law, if redemptions fall below 80 percent two years in a row, regulators can increase the deposit starting in 2017.

Insert a plastic beverage container, feed a stray animal. That's the idea behind a reverse vending machine developed by a Turkish company. Each time somebody puts a used plastic beverage container in it, the machine dispenses some food down at animal height. MTL Blog is encouraging Montreal to adopt the technology.

Roughly two-thirds of farmers surveyed in Wisconsin would haul their agricultural plastics at least 10 miles to participate in a free recycling program, a survey showed. The survey asked dairy farmers about how they dispose of ag plastics and which kinds of recycling programs would engage them. The University of Wisconsin-Extension writes about the study in Daily Herd Management.

 

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India bans new imports of PET scrap

Tue, 08/11/2015 - 18:48
India bans new imports of PET scrap

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 12, 2015

India will no longer consider applications to import PET scrap, with experts saying the country should focus on recycling its own post-consumer scrap.

The July 16 decision by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change pertains to PET beverage containers and other scrap. The decision comes after a government committee of experts in May rejected all applications to import PET.

"The rejection is on the grounds that there is enough availability of PET scrap in the country which remains unutilized creating disposal issue," according to minutes of the May meeting.

The Economic Times reported the move is part of a two-pronged effort to improve the recycling infrastructure in India while preventing the country from turning into a dumping ground for waste from other countries.

In May, the committee rejected three applications to import a total of 86,000 tons of PET beverage containers from various countries, including the U.S. and U.K. but largely from the United Arab Emirates.

During the first half of this year, the U.S. exported a total of 225 tons of PET worth an estimated $95,350 to India, according to U.S. Census data. That amount was relatively little compared to other Asian countries receiving U.S. PET scrap. For example, the U.S. exported a total of 73,556 tons to China and Hong Kong during the first half of 2015.

Recycling companies in India were alarmed at the move, telling The Economic Times they rely on imports of PET because they can't get enough domestically to satisfy the need. Reactions among environmentalists were mixed, with one group saying the ban was a good start but more investments are needed in the country's recycling infrastructure.

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Sign up for Plastics Recycling Update: Technology Edition

Tue, 08/11/2015 - 18:47
Sign up for Plastics Recycling Update: Technology Edition

August 12, 2015

A monthly e-newsletter on the biggest plastics recycling technology news is set to debut Aug. 31.

From the publishers of Plastics Recycling Update, Plastics Recycling Update: Technology Edition will offer readers an exclusive look at processing strides, new equipment and the latest research and inventions in our ever-expanding field.

For the inaugural e-newsletter due out later this month, readers will get an inside look at the equipment in Repreve's $25 million expansion, letters of no objection from the FDA and a never-before-seen project aimed at recovering laminated films.

To receive the free monthly e-newsletter, sign up here.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here.

Austin study details bag ban's consequences

Tue, 08/11/2015 - 18:46
Austin study details bag ban's consequences

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

August 12, 2015

Austin's ban on single-use plastic bags has reduced the number of bags in roadside litter, but too many reusable bags are landing in recycling bins.

That's according to a report by Austin Resource Recovery (ARR), the city department overseeing waste management in Texas' capital.

"There's a lot of good news in the litter assessment that (ARR employee) Aaron Waters did. We feel there's a significant litter reduction. We feel that the effects of the ordinance that were intended are actually there," Bob Gedert, director of Austin Resource Recovery, told Plastics Recycling Update. "But what his study also proved was some unintended consequences – what I call learned lessons – that may require us to modify the ordinance."

Austin, with a population 913,000 residents, implemented its ban on single-use plastic bags in March 2013. In complying with the law, many stores switched to paper bags, while some switched to thicker, 4 mil plastic bags, mostly made of HDPE with some made from LDPE. Four mils is four one-thousanths of an inch. Thin grocery store bags are 0.5 mils. 

Litter composition studies in Fort Worth, Texas, and Austin indicate the ordinance is reducing single-use bag litter. In Fort Worth, which does not have a ban on single-use plastic bags, the bags made up about 0.12 percent of roadside litter. A cleanup in Austin earlier this year showed its rate was 0.03 percent.

Gedert estimates the ordinance has reduced plastic bags going to landfill by about 85 percent. But the study showed residents aren't reusing the thicker bags as many times as they could, and they're putting them into recycling bins instead. The materials recovery facilities serving Austin generally landfill bags they receive.

"The reusable bags are too young, too new to assume that they had 100 uses before they were disposed," Gedert said.

After the ordinance went into effect, an examination of the recycling stream arriving at the MRFs showed reusable plastic bags made up about 0.05 percent of the recycling stream, while single-use ones made up only 0.004 percent, according to the report. Removing the reusable bags from the recycling stream could prevent 23 tons of film from entering the MRFs, nearly the same weight as the single-use bags that were removed from the stream when the ban went into effect, according to the report.

The report recommended the city eliminate the 4 mil bags, but Gedert said he won't recommend that to City Council because they're so much more affordable than cloth bags. Instead, he wants to explore alternative ways the bags could be designed to signal to consumers they should reuse them, instead of recycling them.

The paper bags allowed under the ordinance are also incapable of being reused more than a handful of times because they're thin and tear easily. Gedert may also recommend to the council changing the paper bag specs so they're more durable and can be reused more times, he said.

"My interest is to use the report as lessons learned for the improvement of the Austin ordinance," Gedert said, "as well as that other cities can learn from our experience and design their ordinances in a strong way."

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Buzz begins for fall recycling events

Tue, 08/11/2015 - 18:45
Buzz begins for fall recycling events

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

August 12, 2015

Keep America Beautiful has opened registration for its two major fall events: Recycle-Bowl and America Recycles Day.

The Stamford, Conn.-based nonprofit organization's Recycle-Bowl is a recycling competition for K-12 students and schools. Last year, participating schools collected about 66 tons of plastics for recycling, or about 3 percent of the total weight collected.

America Recycles Day is an event each November in which thousands of people across the country participate in events to support materials diversion.

"Our fall recycling programs, Recycle-Bowl and America Recycles Day, are key initiatives in our efforts to regain momentum for recycling in America, to help people recycle more and recycle right and to change behavior to make recycling a daily social norm across the country," Jennifer Jehn, Keep America Beautiful president and CEO, stated in a press release.

Recycle-Bowl is a nearly month-long competitions between schools to see who can recycle the most. Last year, 1,450 schools competed and recycled a total of more than 2,200 tons of material.

The Recycle-Bowl competition begins on Oct. 19 and ends on America Recycles Day, Nov. 15. America Recycles Day involves individuals and organizations across the country holding educational workshops and recycling collection events. Last year, more than 2,000 events were registered.

Registration opened Aug. 10 for those planning to host an event for America Recycles Day. The event website includes resources and tools.

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Plastics Recycling 2016: Get your brand in front of the industry

Tue, 08/11/2015 - 18:37
Plastics Recycling 2016: Get your brand in front of the industry

August 12, 2015

Sponsorship and exhibitor packages are now available for the leading North American gathering of plastics recycling professionals.

By integrating your company into the action at Plastics Recycling 2016, you'll be ensuring name recognition and brand cache among plastics reclaimers, brokers, packaging executives, government officials and other sustainability leaders. Be sure to act quickly to get ahead of your competitors in terms of exhibit hall placement and sponsorship choices.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and get all the facts on exhbiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.

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