Plastics Recycling Update Magazine

Updated: 1 day 16 hours ago

California details plastics recycling activity and pricing

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:21
California details plastics recycling activity and pricing

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

March 25, 2015

California has released an extensive report on the state's recycling activity and infrastructure as it looks to hit a 75 percent recycling rate goal by 2020. Some intriguing plastics recycling figures are included.

According to the report from California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle), the governmental body overseeing recycling activities throughout the Golden State, Californians recycled and composted roughly 50 percent of all the waste they generated in 2013. That rate, while one of the highest in the nation, has remained essentially flat since 2010.

CalRecycle says plastics accounted for less than 1 percent of the total weight of recyclables processed in the state while making up almost 10 percent of current disposal tonnages.

The value of a ton of scrap PET in California, as of July 2014, was $650, and a ton of HDPE was valued at $1,005, according to the report. While CalRecycle does not provide information on the 2014 value of mixed plastic, the July 2013 value of a ton of mixed plastic in the state was approximately $96.

Overall, 73 million tons of material was generated in California during 2013, and about 27 million tons were recycled. An additional 9.6 million tons were composted.

Mark Oldfield, CalRecycle's communications director, noted two factors could sufficiently push California's recycling growth: the development of statewide recycling infrastructure and greater demand among domestic manufacturers to make use of recovered commodities.

"The key here is both creating an incentive for various materials to be collected for recycling and then creating a further incentive for the remanufacturing of the materials that are collected," Oldfield said.

Based on permitting documents, CalRecycle estimates there are 102 plastics reclamation facilities in the state as well as 100 shredding and grinding operations. Combined, those operations processed 335,000 tons of material in 2013, 63,000 tons below capacity.

According to CalRecycle's count, the plastics manufacturing sector operates 33 facilities that consume 68,000 tons of recycled plastics annually. It has room to consume an additional 3,000 tons.

Without sufficient domestic demand, exports account for the majority of California's recycling activity, the report shows.

Of the 27 million tons of material the state recovered, 18.6 million tons were exported, most often to China, South Korea and Taiwan.

Plastics accounted for 6 percent of the state's scrap exports in 2013.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Plastics Recycling 2016: Start planning now

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:18
Plastics Recycling 2016: Start planning now

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 25, 2015

The plastics recycling industry's most pivotal gathering is headed to New Orleans next February. Register now to make sure your business gets a big boost in the Big Easy.

The February 2016 gathering of top plastics recycling executives will be the 11th iteration of the conference. Plastics Recycling 2015 welcomed more than 1500 attendees from 32 countries, and a packed exhibit hall featured nearly 200 leading companies. Expect even more education, networking and inspiration in New Orleans.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and find out more about exhbiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.


To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

WRAP study finds black PET trays can be detected

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:14
WRAP study finds black PET trays can be detected

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 25, 2015

Use of alternative colorants is giving rise to the hope that black food service trays can be sorted at recycling facilities, says U.K.-waste reduction group WRAP.

A six-month trial project spearheaded by WRAP and grocery store chains Marks & Spencer (M&S) and Sainsbury's found black PET trays containing alternative colorants were in fact detectable by sorting machines at plastics recycling facilities in England.

An estimated 33,000 tons of black trays enter the U.K. waste stream each year, but few are recovered due to challenges in sorting and identifying the packaging type, WRAP says.

"The success of this trial ... marks a significant step forward for plastic recycling and progress for closed loop systems," the group stated in a press release.

WRAP had in recent years studied trays containing colorants, and in the tial project more than 4 million of the trays were used in packaging products sold at select M&S and Sainsbury's stores in Southeast England. Once entering the waste stream, trays were collected curbside, included in mixed plastic bales at local MRFs and then sent to PRFs for further processing.

Using near infrared sorters, PRFs were able to sort the trays and successfully prepare them to be recycled back into food trays.

According to WRAP, if all 33,000 tons of trays used each year in U.K. contained a detectable colorant, municipalities could save at least $3 million in disposal costs.

WRAP says going forward more work needs to be done to support the use of the colorant.

"Investment and support is now needed to prove its operational and commercial viability for both retailers and recyclers in full scale commercial conditions," the group writes.

The issue of detecting black PET trays has been noted in the U.S. as well.

In a 2014 study by North American group PAC NEXT, black plastic containers ranked third among 25 packaging types as one of the most challenging materials for U.S. and Canadian MRFs to handle.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Could 3-D printing spawn greatly expanded resin code system?

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:11
Could 3-D printing spawn greatly expanded resin code system?

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

March 25, 2015

When it comes to recycling the plastic objects created by 3-D printers, seven is not a lucky number. And it’s definitely not a sufficient one.

Researchers at Michigan Technological University have developed a 1-to-140 plastic resin identification system based on codes used in China. They’re proposing to use it as a replacement for the current Nos. 1-7 identification system.

And it’s all due to the growth of 3-D printing.

“The centralized paradigm of both manufacturing and recycling is being challenged by the rise of 3-D printing,” said Joshua Pearce, the lead researcher in the Open Sustainability Technology group at Michigan Tech.

Currently, the plastics most commonly used in 3-D printing are PLA (polylactic acid) and ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), according to Michigan Tech. Because the 1-7 system doesn’t have numbers specifically for them, they often fall into the catch-all No. 7 category. That makes identifying the resins extremely difficult.

Their proposed 140-code system provides specific codes for more resin types. And researchers have made available for free the computer scripts people will need to print the new codes on their plastic objects.

By recycling plastics, Pearce and his team demonstrated that they could reduce the cost of 3-D printing to about 4.5 cents per pound of plastic filament, well below what it costs to buy new filament.

They reported the results of their research in a paper published in Resources, Conservation and Recycling. The paper was co-authored by Pearce and students Emily Hunt, Chenlong Zhang and Nick Anzalone.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Low oil prices threaten U.K. plastics recycling

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:08
Low oil prices threaten U.K. plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 25, 2015

The British Plastics Federation has released a notice on the continued negative impact low oil prices are having on the plastics recovery sector in the U.K.

According to a release from BPF, low oil prices have put certain recycled resins at a distinct price disadvantage when compared with their virgin counterparts.

"Areas of plastics recycling are becoming uncompetitive and this is threatening not only the viability of businesses but also, potentially, the recycling record of the whole supply chain," the group warns in the announcement.

BPF, which represents both manufacturers of recycled plastics and virgin plastics, is now calling on the industry to keep in mind that producers must meet recycling targets established by the U.K. government.

According to the official website of the U.K. government, producers of plastics are on the hook for reaching at least a 47 percent recycling rate in 2015.

U.S. plastics recycling operations have also struggled in recent months trying to compete with virgin plastics that have been offered at lower prices.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

NewsBits

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:04
NewsBits

March 25, 2015

Under a new business deal, Houston-based Avangard Innovative will acquire the scrap HDPE injection grade and bulky rigids that plastic recycling company KW Plastics needs to supply a newly installed wash line. Avangard will manage market development and purchase the plastics from Mexico to supply the Troy, Alabama-based KW Plastics.

An event at the U.S. Capitol drew entrepreneurs who talked about their products aimed at reducing the damage plastics cause to the world’s oceans. The forum was organized by two Democratic Party senators from California who want to spotlight the problem of plastic pollution in the ocean.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sent a non-objection letter to Geo-Tech Polymers, in conjunction with Intertek, the companies announced. The letter applies to all grades of plastics previously certified as FDA approved. Geo-Tech’s cleaning processes are designed to remove contaminants so that food-grade plastics can be recycled back into food-grade products.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Study: Additives don't promote degradation

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:36
Study: Additives don't promote degradation

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

March 18, 2015

A university study suggests additives found in PET and PE might not aid degradability after all.

After studying the impact of a handful of additives on PET and PE in anaerobic, aerobic and landfill environments, a team of researchers led by Susan Selke at Michigan State University concluded "no evidence was found that these additives promote and/or enhance biodegradation."

"Making improper or unsubstantiated claims can produce consumer backlash, fill the environment with unwanted polymer debris, and expose companies to legal penalties," the paper warns.

The study, "Evaluation of Biodegradation-Promoting Additives for Plastics," was published Feb. 27 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Selke holds a doctorate in chemical engineering from Michigan State, where she directs and teaches the School of Packaging.

The recycling industry has largely contested the use of additives in plastics due to fears that it will impact the quality and resiliency of recycled resins over time.

Over a period of three years, Selke's team monitored LDPE containing additives from U.K.-based firms Wells Plastics and Symphony as well as Oshkosh, Wisconsin-based Ecologic. Samples of PET sheet plastic contained additives from Wells and Ecologic. None of the plastics reached complete degradation during the three-year time span, the study says.

In response, Wells, Symphony and Ecologic released a joint statement on the study, taking issue with the findings and drawing attention to their own "independent evidence" on the matter as well as studies running counter to the latest findings.

"Any reputable supplier of oxo-biodegradable plastic technology will be expected to provide independent evidence to its customers to prove degradation, biodegradation and non-toxicity of its products," the statement reads in part.

According to Selke, degradation "requires eventual total breakdown of the molecular structure of the polymer."

"While there's is disagreement on the exact length of time that is 'reasonable' [for total breakdown to occur], there is general consensus that time frames must be on the order of months to a few years, rather than decades to a century," the study posits.

The particular issue of how long it takes for additive-containing plastics to degrade took center stage in a recent court case between the Federal Trade Commission and additive-maker ECM. While a judge ruled plastics with ECM's additive did not fully degrade in as many as five years, as the company had falsely claimed in the past, he found degradation claims in general did not need to be followed by a set time frame for the process to fully occur.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Republic Services to add processing capacity

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:26
Republic Services to add processing capacity

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 18, 2015

The nation's second largest door-to-door recycling collector plans to substantially boost its processing capacity.

Republic Services, which operates 60 materials recovery facilities (MRFs), spent $20 million in 2014 to boost its capacity by 170,000 tons per year, according to its sustainability report. Republic handled nearly 5 million tons last year, with paper representing 72 percent of sales and plastics totaling 5 percent.

The company says it will add an additional 150,000 tons per year in MRF capacity through 2018.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Export figures show full extent of Green Fence rebound

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:20
Export figures show full extent of Green Fence rebound

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 18, 2015

An analysis of full-year 2014 scrap plastic export totals shows a market rebound of nearly 14 percent from 2013's Operation Green Fence levels.

December, the most recent month for which export data is available, saw a 3.0 percent drop month-to-month from November 2014 export levels for scrap plastics, with 359.47 million pounds of the material exported. When matched against December 2013 levels (358.13 million pounds), the volume of plastic scrap exports was up by 0.4 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in December, at 19.19 cents per pound, was down from November 2014 levels by 7.7 percent. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level the price was down by 1.5 percent.

Year-to-date (YTD) figures for scrap plastics showed strong gains. With 4.79 billion pounds exported for 2014, the volume of recovered plastics sent across U.S. borders was up 13.7 percent from its Green Fence-influenced full-year 2013 figure.

At 19.79 cents per pound, however, the average price for 2014 was down by 3.0 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Will Hawaii's Big Island usher in a mixed-waste MRF?

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:17
Will Hawaii's Big Island usher in a mixed-waste MRF?

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 18, 2015

The company behind a $50 million mixed-waste materials recovery facility proposed in Hawaii claims it will divert 70 percent of discarded plastics and other materials to recycling, composting and waste-to-energy.

BioEnergy Hawaii, LLC, is proposing to build the facility near Kailua-Kona, on the west side of the Big Island (also called Island of Hawaii).

The proposed facility would accept municipal solid waste and divert the majority of it from the West Hawaii Sanitary Landfill, extending the life of the landfill, according to a press release. The landfill is owned by the county and operated by Waste Management. Project backers say it aligns with the county mayor's goal of extending the life of the landfill.

The project still faces significant hurdles: An environmental review hasn't been conducted and a lease for land hasn't been finalized. The mayor of Hawaii County, Billy Kenoi, told West Hawaii Today that the project faces a number of federal and state regulatory challenges as well as county permitting and land-use procedures.

The facility would be financed with private equity, but it has the support of a $100 million special purpose revenue bond issued by state government, according to the press release.

BioEnergy Hawaii's parent company is Pacific Waste, Inc., a local waste hauler.

“We have lived and worked on the Big Island for almost 20 years, and as members of the community we all share a responsibility to care for the land,” Kosti Shirvanian, Pacific Waste president, stated. “This project will transform our waste into a resource and make a positive contribution to our community and our environment.”

The facility will separate recyclable materials for resale on the commodity market, according to the company. Organic materials will be treated through an anaerobic digestion process to produce compost and biogas. Other materials, such as mixed papers, textiles, low-value plastics and wood, will be processed into post-recycled engineered fuel, which can be burned to produce energy.

Construction is currently scheduled to begin in summer 2016.

The municipal recycling arena has seen a number of mixed-waste processing projects grab attention in the last year or so. One such facility has opened in Montgomery, Alabama in 2014, and officials in Houston and Indianapolis are currently considering the concept.

Many recycling stakeholders, however, have raised questions about the quality of material produced by these MRFs as well as whether the systems will actually lead to heightened recycling rates in the long term.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

PetroChem Wire: Recycled flake PP strengthens in mid-March

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:14
PetroChem Wire: Recycled flake PP strengthens in mid-March

March 18, 2015

Recycled polypropylene prices for some grades were slightly stronger for the week ended March 13. CoPP mixed colors regrind sold at 43 cents per pound delivered U.S. East Coast (41 cents per pound FOB), up 1.5 cents per pound from a week earlier.

HoPP injection grade mixed color regrind was reported selling at 38 to 40 cents per pound FOB US East Coast, up as much as 3 cents per pound from the previous week. Pellet prices were stable, with HoPP injection, mixed color at 47 to 48 cents per pound FOB and CoPP injection black at 47.5 to 48.5 cents per pound FOB East Coast.

In the prime polypropylene market, U.S. domestic HoPP held steady most of the week at 66.5 cents per pound, but fell to 66 cents per pound on March 13. In the PP scrap market, clean PP super sacks were selling at 10 to 11 cents per pound FOB Houston, up a penny due to revived Asian demand.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Patent watch

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:12
Patent watch

March 18, 2015

Sulzbach, Germany-based Ticona GMBH was awarded Patent Application No. 20140343302 for a method of recycling thermoplastics.

Tokyo-based Ricoh Company, Ltd. has developed a resin made of scrap polystyrene recovered from recycled home appliances and was awarded Patent Application No. 20140371359.

Also based in Tokyo, Konica Minolta, Inc., was given Patent Application No. 20140371363, for a composition of resin composed of scrap thermoplastics.

Swaminathan Ramesh, from Canton, Michigan, was given Patent Application No. 20140364663 for a method of recycling scrap plastics.

TeTechS, Inc., headquartered in Waterloo, Ontario, was awarded Patent Application No. 20140367316, for a method of sorting scrap plastic materials.

Patent Application, No. 20140373697, concerning a scrap tire shredder, was given to Ashern, California's OTR Recycling Corp.

Kiryat Tivon, Israel-based Amir Pundak was awarded Patent Application No. 20140373738 for compactor of plastic beverage container.

A method of making thermoplastic products with recycled materials, developed by Salt Lake City-based Maxwell Products, Inc., was given Patent Application No. 20150018460.

Zhejiang Boretech Co., Ltd., headquartered in Pinghu City, China, was awarded Patent Application No. 20150033927 for a device to remove labels from containers prior to recycling.

A group of researchers from Hertfordshire, Great Britain, led by Omer Kutluoglu, was given Patent Application No. 20150024187 for a method of producing a recycled composite plastic.

A method of producing a composite plastic from MSW is the subject of Patent Application No. 20150027037, awarded to Kula, Hawaii's Mark A. MacMillan.

Patent Application No. 20150027498 was given to a team of researchers based in Hamburg, Germany led by Michael Hoffmann for a method of removing impurities from shredded recovered plastic materials via friction cleaning.

A Montreal, Quebec-based firm called Polyvalor, Limited Partnership was awarded Patent Application No. 20150031837 for a method of making a composite plastic out of blends of different types of recovered plastics.

A sortation device using "tuned waves" is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140374326, given to Lakeland, Florida's Spencer Allen Miller and Reza Khoshnoodi.

Seattle's Mike Waggoner was awarded Patent Application No. 20140377523 for a method of making multi-layered plastic end-products from recovered plastic materials.

Patent Application No. 20140378026, which concerns a material-extruding toy recycling truck, was given to Pawtucket, Rhode Island's Hasbro, Inc.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

NewsBits

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 21:07
NewsBits

March 18, 2015

In one parody spawned during a dispute between Keurig Green Mountain and recycling interests, Star Wars-style rebels challenge the “Keurig Empire” by hacking a machine to accept more environmentally friendly coffee pods. Opponents are taking aim at the company for producing not-readily-recyclable plastic cups while stifling others’ attempts to produce recyclable cups that work in their coffee makers.

A San Francisco Bay-area company is trying to reduce the amount of plastic required to package laundry detergent by putting its product in pouches, instead of bottles. But, because the pouches are made from a not-specifically-designated "No. 7" that isn’t universally accepted in curbside recycling programs, the company is attempting to raise funds for a packaging drop-off or mail-in product stewardship system.

No radical changes are necessary to improving plastics recycling; instead, what the sector needs is greater participation rates in existing programs. That's the view of Harry Floyd, program coordinator of the Clean Fairfax Council in VIrginia. In a blog post on The Hill political news site, he called for sensible action to improve the amount of plastics that get recycled.

The U.S. has had an on-again, off-again love affair with recycling, which has been shaped by technology, markets and public relations. So writes John Timmer, science editor at Ars Technica.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Cooperation key to NYC plastics recycling expansion

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:20
Cooperation key to NYC plastics recycling expansion

By Dan Leif, Plastics Recycling Update

March 11, 2015

In April 2013, New York City began directing residents to toss all rigid plastics in their recycling bins. Two years later, that initiative appears to be working out, thanks in part to the efforts of New York's downstream processing partners.

At last month's Plastics Recycling 2015 conference in Dallas, representatives from three entities key to the New York plastics play took to the stage to describe how America's largest city has been able to steer significantly higher quantities of discarded plastics (especially Nos. 3-7) out of the landfill stream.

Bridget Anderson, deputy commissioner for recycling and sustainability at the New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY), offered the municipal angle. She said the decision to bring more plastics into the system was not purely an economic move. The City pays a $70 per ton tip fee for metal, glass and plastic recyclables, and it sees only a limited amount of revenue sharing once those materials are marketed.

Anderson also pointed out that a recent waste characterization study found plastics represent 14 percent of discards by city residents. As officials looked to respond to pushes from former Mayor Michael Bloomberg and bolster a long-stagnated recycling rate, inviting more plastic types into recycling bins seemed like a potential pathway.

The move has meant increased volumes of items such as yogurt containers, clamshells and shampoo bottles heading into New York's recycling stream. Once collected, that material becomes the responsibility of Sims Municipal Recycling, which had been handling much of New York's recycling at a facility in New Jersey. In late 2013, the company opened another facility, the much-heralded $100 million MRF in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn.

On stage in Dallas, Sims' Maite Quinn said her company, which currently has a 20-year processing contract with DSNY, had some initial reservations about the influx of a broad range of plastics. "We had questions about how it would affect our equipment," she said, "but we took the dive."

The move by New York happened to occur at the same time China's Operation Green Fence customs crackdown struck the U.S. recycling industry, and in some ways that was actually helpful for New York program stakeholders. Quinn, who is Sims Municipal Recycling's manager of business development and marketing, said Sims had made alterations to their optical sorters after the Fence went up, and the changes helped the company capture and separate the tubs and lids that were more frequently coming in when New York changed its plastics policy.

She added Sims has seen monthly volumes in the metal, glass and plastic category increase by 10 percent since New York went to its expanded approach. "Seventy-five percent of that material has a market," she said.

That market perspective was voiced at the Dallas session by Stephanie Baker, director of recycling market development at Troy, Alabama-based KW Plastics. The company's recycling division specializes in working with PP and HDPE, and it buys significant tonnages of New York material from Sims. Baker noted KW buys 50 million pounds of tubs and lids material annually from 10 different MRF companies around the country.

She noted that communication between stakeholders has been critical in successfully moving New York materials downstream. In recent years, KW published bale specs for both bulky rigids and tubs and lids, and Baker praised Sims' work to keep such contamination requirements in mind.

"We sometimes talk about cutting out the middleman in recycling," Baker said. "In this case, the project wouldn't have happened without the middleman."

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Sorema leads purchase of Perpetual Recycling Solutions

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:17
Sorema leads purchase of Perpetual Recycling Solutions

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 11, 2015

First, Sorema helped equip Perpetual Recycling Solutions’ 100,000-square-foot PET recycling facility. Now, it is part of a group purchasing the processing company.

Sorema Plastics Recycling Systems, an Italian firm, leads a partnership that recently acquired Indiana-based Perpetual, according to a press release.

Perpetual Recycling Solutions’ recycling facility opened in Richmond, Indiana in January 2013, using processing equipment from Sorema. The facility can process up to 80,000 tons of PET per year to produce flake for manufacturing into new products, including food-grade plastic products.

“The Perpetual team has already made a significant contribution to the rPET industry, producing the highest quality clear flake in the market,” Aldo Previero, a director and owner of Sorema, stated in a press release. “We are confident that we can help Perpetual make another leap forward. We have been working together with the company and its financial partners since the fall and have already seen important improvements in plant efficiency and product consistency.”

Perpetual's founder and CEO, David Bender, will remain with the company to focus on special projects.

Sorema is a division of the Italy-based Previero.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Canada Fibers sharpens plastic focus

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:15
Canada Fibers sharpens plastic focus

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

March 11, 2015

One of Canada's largest MRF operators is focusing more specifically on the plastics recycling space with a Toronto-based operation targeting PET, HDPE and PP.

The move furthers a trend toward the development of plastics recovery facilities (or PRFs) in North America as export markets remain fickle and plastic products make up a larger percentage of the post-consumer stream.

Canada Fibers representatives say the recently formed Urban Polymers business will be able to process 25 million pounds of PET and 11 million pounds of HDPE and PP a year.

"It's a logical next step for Canada Fibers," Urban Polymers CEO Mark Badger told Plastics Recycling Update. "Canada Fibers is in the recovery business and this takes us one step further into the recovery business."

According to the Canada Fibers website, the company currently has six plant locations, most of them in the Toronto area.

Badger said PET flake from the Urban Polymers operation will mostly go toward North American bottle manufacturing, while HDPE and PP pellets will be used "primarily in non-food grade applications," including detergent packaging.

Badger said "there's a market in place" for all three resins, but additional markets could open up for recycled HDPE and PP if "they get the consistency and purity and the degree of custom-compounding they would like."

Badger said the company will use technology and equipment from European manufacturers. Badger expects the facility to open in the spring and employ at the onset about 25 employees.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE injection crate prices rise

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:12
PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE injection-crate prices rise

March 11, 2015

HDPE injection-crate pellet and flake prices rose in early March as end users booked deliveries following a mostly dormant February.

Regrind prices increased 5-6 cents per pound with business done at 46 cents per pound delivered Ontario and U.S. East Coast (around 44 cents per pound FOB). Pellet business was done at 50-51 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast, up 2.5 cents per pound from the end of February.

HDPE bale pricing also rebounded. Natural bales from curbside rose around 2 cents per pound the first week of March to 26-27 cents per pound as supply tightened due to weather-related delays in curbside pick-up and bale preparation by municipalities and MRFs. Mixed colored bale prices were also higher.

In the prime injection grade polyethylene market, prices slipped from 64 cents per pound at the end of February to 63.5 cents per pound on March 6.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

NewsBits

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:09
NewsBits

March 11, 2015

A $1 million, 175,000-pound, custom-built kiln has been delivered from Germany to Vadxx Energy's plant in Akron, Ohio. Once completed, the company says, the operation will will be capable of converting 60 tons of plastic to diesel fuel each day.

The European Commission plans to reintroduce its “circular economy” proposals on increasing recycling and targeting zero waste systems. The EU’s environment, maritime affairs and fisheries commissioner said binding measures would be introduced. In response, the head of PlasticsEurope said the industry supports the circular economy notion but called for proposals to be flexible in how goals are achieved.

Theft of recyclable materials in San Francisco is an issue, but when it comes to low-income people pulling materials from bins, hauler and MRF operator Recology isn’t concerned. However, the company does want to find a way to stop fly-by-night operators who buy materials from these pickers, often taking advantage of them, and sell to recycling centers.

The leader of the U.K. Liberal Democrats party pledged to ensure that biodegradable and paper bags are also charged a fee, along with other single-use plastic bags under bag policy in the country. Nick Clegg, deputy prime minister, said the Liberal Democrats, if they remain in power following May elections, would seek to have the 5 pence (currently about 8 cents) fee placed on all single-use bags. The current law, set to go into effect in October, exempts biodegradable and paper bags.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Industry and supplier news

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:07
Industry and supplier news

March 11, 2015

Italy-based company AMUT Group has purchased a company that specializes in cast and blown lines for flexible films. AMUT Group, a manufacturer of plastics recycling and extrusion equipment, purchased Dolci Bielloni. For more, click here.

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers recognized three companies for new products that it says meet or exceed its standards for recyclability. The companies were DAK America of Charlotte, North Carolina; Plastipak Packaging of Plymouth, Michigan; and Sleever International of France. For more, click here.

Arkansas-based Delta Plastics announced it has reached a milestone: 1 billion pounds of plastics recycled since it began operations in 1998. The company, which says it’s the largest processor of plastics in the state, specializes in recycling and producing agricultural plastics. For more, click here.

Think Beyond Plastic Innovation Form has organized an event at the U.S. Capitol featuring recycling, material, manufacturing and design innovations that reduce the impacts of plastics on the world’s oceans. The March 16 meeting will feature exhibitors and a panel discussion on the role government has in the space. For more, click here.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Plastics recycling group lays out extensive agenda

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 23:33
Plastics recycling group lays out extensive agenda

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 4, 2015

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers held its largest-ever membership meeting last week in Dallas, with over 200 members in attendance. Association members took the opportunity to discuss a number of issues.

The group, which held the annual meeting last week following the Plastics Recycling Conference, reported record membership and revenues topping $1 million in 2014. Eight new members were also welcomed at the Dallas meeting.

Steve Alexander, APR’s executive director, laid out the group’s key challenges:

  • Labels – APR's Full Wrap Shrink Sleeve Working Group continues to look into label floatability to increase and support container recycling.
  • Degradables – The organization continues to be concerned about marketing claims of certain additives and is closely monitoring the activity at the federal level following a recent ruling by a Federal Trade Commission judge regarding a biodegradable additive producer’s marketing claims.
  • Closures – APR is also looking into the impact of closures on the recyclability of containers.
  • Problem containers – The group is urging its members to notify APR about problem containers in the market.

In terms of other major activities, APR is helping influence ASTM’s various definitional efforts, including current committees focusing on the resin code used on containers and on the definition of biodegradation. APR also plans to take part in Walmart’s packaging initiatives as well as supporting the Recycling Partnership, a Curbside Value Partnership effort to increase municipal recycling tonnages in select cities.

The association also is planning a number of open webinars in 2015, including those focusing on EPS recycling, the promotion of recycling collection programs where caps stay on recovered plastic bottles, and a summary of APR efforts to support domestic recycling markets.

APR’s 36-member rigid plastics committee is developing promotional materials targeting grocers, noting that the value of mixed rigid plastics is worth three times that paid for the old corrugated containers that stores generate. The committee is also very active in addressing issues regarding thermoform and PP packaging recovery.

A second active committee has targeted expanded polyolefin recovery. This group is assessing better ways to separate PP and PE and is also focusing on those PP packaging design factors, such as packaging size and shape, that affect recovery at local recycling plants.

A new APR educational project involves having association executives and members make presentations to brand owner executives regarding key plastics recycling issues and concerns, and to present them summaries of key APR technical research on recyclability.

One of APR’s newest efforts is the re-establishment of a films recycling committee. The group is considering ways to work closely with the films recycling work being undertaken by the American Chemistry Council. Like other APR committees, this group will try to address how to get more clean material for recycling.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

.

.