A $15 million container recycling facility slated for BC

A $15 million container recycling facility slated for BC

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 23, 2014

British Columbia will be getting a new residential packaging and printed paper recycling center to help the province transition to an extended producer responsibility way of life.

The $15 million packaging and printed paper (PPP) facility will be built in New Westminster and sort and sell recyclables on behalf of Multi-Material BC (MMBC), the group responsible for the province-wide rollout of a producer-led system for residential collection of recyclables. Vancouver's extended producer responsibility (EPR) program is set to begin May 19 and serve about 1.25 million households.

The PPP center will be run by Green by Nature, an organization picked by MMBC after a bidding process to handle PPP obligations under the new program. MMBC has mandated the effort achieve a 75 percent recycling rate for PPP. Green by Nature was created from investments from three large partners — Cascades Recovery, Emterra Environmental and Merlin Plastics — and will subcontract with about 20 companies to aid in collection and recovery activities.

The new facility will be 179,000-square-feet, and MMBC anticipates it will be up and running by "early next year." Up to 70 people will be employed at the new plant, which will attempt to process more than 200,000 tons of PPP annually.

Not everyone is thrilled about the construction plans. In the wake of the facility announcement, some New Westminster officials expressed worry the influx of trucks headed to the plant would make a big impact on local traffic and could harm some retail businesses.

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Comments

MMBC/GBN take over of recycling in the name of "EPR"

This new plastics MRF, if it goes through, will be the first tangible flagship venture by a consortium set up by a handful of Canadian national brand-owners. This was accomplished at the invitation and without interference from a provincial government that forgot what government is for. In Ethe name of non-prescriptiveness, this government has eliminated the referee from the playing field. And the carnage is just beginning.

Multi-Materials BC is the latest incarnation of OMMRI/CIPSI, the perpetrators of the "multi-material" Blue Box system that has been described by a sitting Ontario environment minister as "a disaster." MMBC came out here and, with the help of a stable of Ontario's most experienced consultants, threw municipal staffs and politicians into total confusion (offering them contracts with no firm terms, threatening them with extortionary fines, etc.) and then went on to completely take over the recycling industry (setting up a consortium of three companies to control it).

It brings out the worst in everyone and will likely hold back EPR and Zero Waste for decades.  If it goes through, and is not quashed in the lawsuit that is being launched by businesses cut out of the system.

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