"Pathbreaking" food scrap law passes in NYC

"Pathbreaking" food scrap law passes in NYC

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

New York City lawmakers have approved a measure that requires large commercial enterprises within the Big Apple to divert food scraps.

The legislation, Intro 1162-A, bans the landfilling of food scraps from generators such as large restaurants, food retailers, caterers, sports arenas and other establishments larger than 25,000 square feet. The scraps will be used as feedstock for composting and bio-gas facilities in the New York City area.

A joint statement from the US Composting Council and American Biogas Council called the action "pathbreaking," and the groups predicted the move will bring both economic and environmental benefits to the New York area.

"With the passage of this initiative, NYC is taking a bold and decisive step toward establishing a sustainable environment for its citizens," said Lori Scozzafava, executive director of the USCC. "Our members have manufactured compost for decades and are prepared to lend their expertise as New Yorkers learn to manage their organic material."

Michael Bloomberg, whose term as mayor ended at the close of 2013, had pushed hard for environmentally minded reforms throughout his final months in office. He helped establish a citywide goal of diverting 75 percent of solid waste from landfills by 2030.

In a statement, Bloomberg said the commercial food scrap legislation is a significant step towards our PlaNYC goal of diverting more waste from landfills."

MRP Banner

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here.

 

.

.