Portland food scraps to again cross state lines

Portland food scraps to again cross state lines

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

The final destination for some of Portland, Oregon's food scraps, which have been the cause of much controversy, has been determined — for now.

Portland has long sent its commercial and residential food scraps to a facility in the state operated by Nature's Needs. The composting operation had also been the source or ire from some residents of nearby North Plains, some of which formed an activist group called "Stop the Stink" and actively lobbied to have the facility shuttered.

In January, those activists got part of their wish when the Washington County Board of Commissioners voted to no longer allow the facility, owned and operated by Recology Oregon Recovery, to accept commercial food scraps, which some commissioners suspected was the source of the odors. The board still allowed the facility to accept residential food scraps and yard debris.

Now, The Oregonian reports that Portland's commercial food scraps will be sent 200 miles away to a facility in Stanwood, Washington operated by Lentz Enterprises. The newspaper reports that the facility is permitted to accept 45,000 tons of waste annually. It has been taking food scraps for about five years, a local official told the paper, and it's never had an odor complaint. The Oregonian also reports that the Recology is looking into sending material to multiple sites.

This is not the first time Portland has sent its organic materials to Washington. During a pilot program several years ago, the city shipped its food scraps and yard debris to the Seattle-area Cedar Grove composting facility.

Schutte Buffalo Hammer Mill

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