NewsBits

NewsBits

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Atlanta's new residential recycling program "Cartlanta" has increased recycling tonnage from 1,079 tons collected since it began in October to 1,403 tons, an increase of 23 percent. The city is also making about $30 per ton of recyclables diverted from landfills.

The manager for Waste Management's new materials recovery facility that recently opened to serve the Topeka, Kansas area has a message for the residents: Don't put plastic bags in with your recyclables, reports The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Think.Eat.Save. Reduce your Foodprint is a campaign recently launched by the U.N. Environment Programme, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and other partner organizations, that seeks to encourage simple actions by consumers and food retailers aimed at reducing the 1.4 billion tons of food waste generated each year.

A Florida law intended to combat metal theft appears to be working, at least in Tampa and neighboring areas, reports the local ABC affiliate. Citing numbers from local law enforcement, the station reports that since the law went into effect in July of last year that metal thefts have dropped from 406 to 169 for the same nine-month period, year to year.

Residents of Maryville, Tennessee are so eager to recycle that the three free recycling centers, operated by RockTenn, are overwhelmed with recyclables, reports The Daily Times. In response, city officials are planning to limit use of the recycling centers to only city residents, shut one down, reduce hours and hire employees to supervise them.

In Morton Grove, Illinois, a suburb or Chicago, a proposal for a recycling center may be delayed because of the recent merger of Lakeshore Waste Services and Recycling Systems, which became Lakeshore Recycling Systems, reports The Chicago Tribune. According to the paper, plans for a recycling center in the village are controversial, with some residents concerned that it would attract pests and lower property values.

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