The wide world of recycling

The wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

In the U.K., a group representing recycling companies is raising concerns about the high cost of low-quality recyclables, and a computer company is stepping up its efforts to recycle used electronics in India.

The Resource Association has released a report that highlights how poor and inconsistent recycled material is adversely affecting industry in the U.K. The report conservatively estimates that managing bad recyclable feedstock is adding another 51 million GBP ($83 million) in costs annually to industry that uses the material.

The report relied on a survey of reprocessors who are members of the Resource Association and represent about half of all the U.K.'s reprocessing capacity for paper and cardboard, plastics, aluminum and glass.

In response to the report's conclusions, the Resource Association is calling for better regulations and oversight of material recovery facilities, as well as more research to better understand the relationship between collection systems, public behavior and what causes contamination.

Dell has opened 16 electronics recycling collection points in 13 cities in India where consumers can drop off their used electronics free of charge and regardless of brand.

The collection points will be located at existing Dell Carry-In Service Centers, where consumers can get their devices repaired. The drop-off points are an extension of the company's global free recycling program that seeks to boost recycling of electronics.

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