ResourceRecycling.com RSS Feeds

NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 10/06/2014 - 22:37
NewsBits

Oct. 7, 2014

A Denver-based company called Higher Standard Packaging has launched a line of 100 percent recycled HDPE containers for, you guessed it, marijuana. Nearly 300,000 pounds of legalized pot is expected to be sold in Colorado this year alone, and Higher Standard says it has successfully developed the first FDA-approved, recycled packaging for the drug.

Prompted by states beginning to consider extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs, the Aluminum Association has shared its thoughts on the approach in a post entitled "Extended Producer Responsibility: Common Sense Policy for Common Sense Solutions." While making clear that "the aluminum industry does not have a formal position on EPR," the post does provide a list of things to take into account before making producers of packaging responsible for the collection and recycling of their products. The domestic recycling rate for aluminum cans has largely stayed flat in recent years – at around 54 percent.

Ad sales at the seven trade publications serving waste and recycling can be a good indication of general market conditions in those sectors, and an analysis by Resource Recycling of the first three quarters of 2014 shows continued sluggishness. Ad sales at the seven periodicals dropped 4 percent in the first three quarters of this year. That said, well over half of the falloff can be attributed to the large slump in sales at just one periodical – Waste360, which had ad placements down by 24 percent. This follows a 30 percent drop at the publication in 2013. Four periodicals saw a rise in ad sales, but sales growth was minimal among these magazines. While Resource Recycling had the largest growth, it was a mere 3 percent.

The former president of recycling at Waste Management has become CEO of WCA Waste Corporation, the Texas-based firm announced. After leaving Waste Management last month, Bill Caesar will take control of WCA and focus "on executing a successful long-term growth strategy and building WCA into a leading non-hazardous waste services company," according to a press release. Before entering the waste management industry in 2010, Caesar had worked for 13 years as a principal at consulting firm McKinsey & Company.

Officials in Napa Valley, California have indicated their pursuit of greater diversion totals will also lead to higher program costs. Currently in negotiations for a new waste and recycling contract to take effect in 2017 and last for 12 to 14 years, the City expects the overall cost to exceed $250 million and increase the municipal diversion rate from roughly 65 percent to its 2020 goal of 75 percent.

The incentives-based recycling tech company Recyclebank has recently marked its 10 year anniversary and CEO Javier Flaim has reflected on the past decade in an article on Greenbiz.com. You can read it here.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

APR shrink sleeve study released

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 14:42
APR shrink sleeve study released

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Oct. 3, 2014

A working group has identified a series of recycling-friendly design tips for manufacturers of full-wrap shrink sleeve labels.

Importantly, the suggestions, put forward by the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR) Shrink Label Working Group in a new report, won't ask label makers to ditch the full-wrap concept altogether. Instead, the working group says it has arrived at some design adjustments that will help PET bottle reclaimers identify and sort the labeled bottles.

"Recyclers were seeing more and more containers with full-wrap shrink sleeve labels contaminating their material," said John Standish, technical director of APR, in a press release. "We formed a group to clearly identify steps that would allow brand owners to take advantage of these labels without creating a negative impact on the quality of the rPET stream."

Those steps, outlined and fleshed out in the report, include:

  • Employ sleeve labels that will float in water and separate from PET flakes in a sink/float material separation step.
  • Employ printed labels where the label inks do not stain PET flakes in the wash/rinse step.
  • Use APR’s Critical Guidance Document for Shrink Labels for PET Bottles as a comprehensive laboratory test program to assess the impact of a label on recycling PET Bottles.
  • Where possible, use a sleeve label that leaves at least 20 percent of the PET bottle surface area exposed. This will allow the most accurate auto-sortation by the broadest range of color sorters installed at processing facilities.

By following the four steps listed above, APR says, bottle reclaimers won't face the sizable challenges Standish highlighted in an in-depth article in the August 2014 issue of Plastics Recycling Update.

APR cautions the industry it will take some time to fully implement the group's recommendations. "We cannot expect a widespread change in label technologies for at least two to three years' time," APR writes in the report, noting that existing labels are simply cheaper to produce at the moment and that brand owners have to honor their current contracts before making label changes.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Plastics Recycling 2015: An entire industry under one roof

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 14:38
Plastics Recycling 2015: An entire industry under one roof

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Oct. 3, 2014

North America's largest gathering of plastics recycling professionals is set for next February in Dallas, Texas.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is your opportunity to network with clients, prospective partners, colleagues, vendors and industry leaders all in one location. The 2014 edition, held in Orlando, attracted more than 1,775 attendees from over 30 countries. Meeting everyone in one venue will save you precious time and travel expenses.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for complete information on attending the conference as well as exclusive exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

California bag ban signed as opponents eye referendum

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 14:32
California bag ban signed as opponents eye referendum

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Oct. 3, 2014

California's plastic bag ban has been signed into law, but opponents have pledged to fight on.

The nation's first state-level ban on single-use checkout bags was signed into law on Sept. 30 by California Gov. Jerry Brown, who afterward praised the measure as a sign of things to come.

"This bill is a step in the right direction – it reduces the torrent of plastic polluting our beaches, parks and even the vast ocean itself," Brown said in a press release. "We’re the first to ban these bags, and we won’t be the last."

That announcement, however, was countered by a fierce proclamation from the ban's primary opponent, the SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association-funded American Progressive Bag Alliance (APBA). After lobbying aggressively but unsuccessfully in the weeks and months leading up to the bill's passage through the California legislature, APBA has now set its sights on a referendum.

"We have taken the necessary steps to gather signatures and qualify a referendum to repeal SB 270 on the November 2016 ballot," an APBA statement reads. "Since state lawmakers failed their constituents by approving this terrible bill, we will take the question directly to the public and have great faith they will repeal it at the ballot box."

APBA has been a vocal critic of bag ban ordinances throughout the country, attacking the overall effort as misguided. The group characterized California's law as "a backroom deal between the grocers and union bosses to scam California consumers out of billions of dollars without providing any public benefit."

The website of California Secretary of State Debra Brown confirms that a referendum is indeed possible on the measure, although APBA will have to move quickly.

"A proponent has only 90 days from the date of the enactment of a bill … to request and receive a title and summary from the Attorney General … print petitions, gather the required number of valid signatures, and file the petitions with the county elections officials," the explanation reads.

APBA will have to gain a little more than 500,000 valid signatures to get the issue in front of voters.

In addition to banning single-use plastic bags, the California law requires a minimum 10 cent charge on paper, compostable and reusable bags.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Massachusetts bottle bill debate shines light on recycling access

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 14:21
Massachusetts bottle bill debate shines light on recycling access

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Oct. 3, 2014

With a little more than a month before voters in Massachusetts decide on whether to expand their state's bottle bill, interest groups on both sides of the issue are turning up the heat and offering two distinct vantage points on the convenience of plastic recycling in the state.

Thus far, opponents of the expansion, which would add a nickel deposit on water and many other non-carbonated plastic beverage containers, have spent a reported $7.8 million to paint the move as unnecessary and costly in a pair of TV ads and a wider media campaign. Proponents, meanwhile, have contributed roughly $525,000 into the "Update the Bottle Bill Coalition" and attacked deep-pocketed, "big soda" companies for misleading the general public leading up to the Nov. 4 ballot vote.

"The purpose of these ads is to trick voters and scare them into voting no," Janet Domenitz, executive director of the Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group, said in statement. "I expect the next thing their ads will say is that the cow jumped over the moon."

One specific issue the two groups have butted heads on is the percentage of residents with access to curbside recycling. In the TV ads, the anti-expansion camp argues that access has reached 90 percent. Update supporters have countered that claim by suggesting that less than half of Massachusetts' cities and towns ‒ 47.5 percent ‒ have access to "easy, walk-outside-your-door curbside recycling."

Both groups claim that access directly correlates with recycling rates. If the access is high, the thinking goes, a bottle bill expansion wouldn't be necessary, but if the access is low, that expansion could get more containers in the recycling stream by putting a nickel bounty on them.

So which side is right? According to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), which openly supports the deposit addition, "nearly all Massachusetts cities and towns offer their residents the opportunity to recycle." But just 25 percent of water and non-carbonated beverage bottles are getting recycled through those opportunities, MassDEP figures show.

The groups on both sides of the bottle bill debate are expected to continue to ramp up their efforts to reach Massachusetts voters in the next month.

The ads produced thus far from the "No on Question 2" campaign can be viewed here. The official pro-expansion response, conversely, can be viewed here.

For the past decade, Massachusetts has wrestled with the idea of expanding the state's beverage deposit system. A Boston Globe poll in August found strong support for the ballot measure, which is also supported by Gov. Deval Patrick.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

PetroChem Wire: HIPS white regrind prices rise on strong demand

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 14:18
PetroChem Wire: HIPS white regrind prices rise on strong demand

Oct. 3, 2014

Prices for recycled HIPS white flake increased in late September to 59 to 60 cents per pound FOB Eastern U.S. as strong demand outstripped supply.

Prices were firm throughout the month, and are up nearly 15 percent from the beginning of 2014 as less HIPS regrind is being offered on the open market. HIPS white repro prices were steady in late September at 76 to 78 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast.

Off-spec generic prime HIPS was offered in late September at 97 to 98 cents per pound, domestic resale delivered to U.S. locations, with normal spec generic HIPS holding in the second half September at $1.09 per pound on the U.S. Gulf.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 13:38
NewsBits

Oct. 3, 2014

Residents of Ruidoso, New Mexico will soon be able to sort and recycle PET and HDPE plastic containers thanks to a revamped recycling policy expected to go into effect later this month. While plastics No. 3-7 will not be accepting for recycling, the value of scrap plastic – now at $315 per 1,500 pound bale in southern New Mexico – has convinced the community to give plastics recycling a chance.

Recycling-savvy residents in Charleston, South Carolina will be eligible to win free $50 gift certifications from Harris Teeter for the next six months. The initiative, which is part of Coca-Cola's "Recycling & Win" program, is aimed at recognizing "households which are recycling properly" ‒ in other words, recycling as much as possible and only those items Charleston's curbside program accepts. Residents are in luck when it comes to plastics, as all plastic containers Nos. 1-7 are accepted for recycling in the city.

A firm called Florida Agricultural Plastics has begun operating at a 65,000-square-foot facility in Avon Park, Florida. The company says its first wash line has an annual capacity of washing 30 million pounds of used agricultural film.

A new report out of California suggests that most MRFs are holding off on recycling cartons. The report, released by Californians Against Waste, suggests that just 13 percent of California MRFs separate cartons, which contain at least 20 percent polyethylene, for recycling. For more in-depth coverage on the report and the carton manufacturing industry's response, click here

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Aluminum can recycling rate flat in 2013

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:59
Aluminum can recycling rate flat in 2013

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Oct. 1, 2014

The aluminum can recycling rate barely budged in 2013, with recycling volumes and new can shipments down and domestic can recycling continuing to hold back growth.

According to the Aluminum Association, Can Manufacturers Institute and Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, the can recycling rate in 2013 was 66.7 percent – the 2012 rate, by comparison, came in at 67.0 percent, while 2011's rate was 65.1.

"Aluminum cans are recycled more readily and more frequently than any other beverage packaging type ‒ period," Heidi Brock, president and CEO of the Aluminum Association, said in a press release.

More detailed figures provided by the Aluminum Association show that 1.721 million pounds of aluminum cans were recycled during the year, a 2.9 percent decrease from 2012. Shipments, however, were also down, by 2.4 percent, coming in at 2.581 million pounds.

While the aluminum recycling rate has grown over the years, the Aluminum Association credits much of that growth to the significant UBC tonnages the U.S. imports for recycling.

"While the rate of industry can recycling has risen significantly over the past decade, much of the growth in recent years has come from the addition of imported used cans entering the U.S. recycling stream," the announcement reads. "Because of aluminum's high inherent value and the closed loop recycling process of can-making, U.S. recyclers often import used cans from Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia and other countries."

Had the Aluminum Association counted only its domestic can recycling rate, as the Container Recycling Institute has pushed for, it is likely to have been somewhere between 53 and 55 percent in 2013, relatively unchanged compared to years past.

It should also be noted that lightweighting has also made it more difficult for the aluminum and recycling industries to significantly increase can recycling by weight. The latest data shows that 34.95 cans currently amount to a pound of aluminums; 33.7 cans did so in 2003.


To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Save the Date

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:57
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Save the Date

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Oct. 1, 2014

Sure, we're a year out, but it's never too early to mark your calendar to ensure you are a part of the premier gathering of North American municipal recycling decision-makers. The next Resource Recycling Conference is slated for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Marriott Downtown in Indianapolis. The recently wrapped-up 2014 conference featured the top minds in sustainable materials management as well as a slate of educational sessions that helped attendees better understand the most pressing recycling issues and how they're set to evolve.

Keep an eye on rrconference.com for information about attending, exhibiting and sponsoring the best recycling conference in America.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Is carton recycling failing in California?

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:54
Is carton recycling failing in California?

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Oct. 1, 2014

According to a California environmental organization, many cartons collected in the Golden State are ending up in landfills and should instead be integrated into a deposit system.

In a new report, Californians Against Waste (CAW) cites research indicating that MRFs rarely separate gable top and aseptic cartons for recycling due to low volumes.

While as much as 80 percent of curbside programs include cartons, just 13 percent of the 98 MRFs surveyed for the report stated they segregate cartons for "stand-alone recycling." An additional 47 percent said some cartons are diverted (in the mixed waste paper stream) while 37 percent report simply landfilling the packaging.

CAW uses these numbers to suggest that adding cartons to the state's bottle bill would increase the recycling rate for the material type from a "negligible," sub-3 percent clip to 33 percent in just three years. In the process, the CAW report asserts that the $2 million carton manufacturer group Carton Council of North America has spent on advancing recycling in the state has thus far failed to make a sizable impact.

The Carton Council's vice president of recycling projects, Jason Pelz, sent a 2-page response to Resource Recycling addressing those assertions and the work manufacturers have done so far.

"Getting all MRFs to sort cartons takes time," Pelz writes. "We’ve made tremendous progress since we began five years ago, and the fact that cartons are now being looked at like other beverage containers regularly recycled validates that."

Pelz also asserts that Council statistics show "that actually 15 to 17 percent of the MRFs in California sort cartons. And those are large MRFs that serve 30 percent of households in California with access to carton recycling today."

That said, Pelz, who also serves as vice president of environment at packaging company Tetra Pak, acknowledges the group is "mindful of the volume situation" and has continued to push for non-bottle-bill solutions, including an effort to allow cartons to be accepted alongside other paper items under the newly created Paper Stock Industries Grade #52 designation.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Rayovac opts to support battery legislation

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:50
Rayovac opts to support battery legislation

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Oct. 1, 2014

Just as battery legislation debate is charging up, a battery maker long accused of dodging its duties to support single-use battery recycling appears to be opening up to the concept.

In a post on its website, Rayovac, one of the largest manufacturers of both rechargeable and single-use batteries in the U.S., has come out in support of an all-encompassing model bill hammered out earlier this summer.

"Spectrum Brands and its U.S. Rayovac Battery Division … pledge our support for industry and legislative efforts for the first-ever model all battery recycling bill unveiled in June 2014," the statement reads.

That statement, according to the Texas Campaign for the Environment (TCE), was posted after the group descended upon the Madison, Wisconsin headquarters of Rayovac's parent company, Spectrum Brands, urging the manufacturer to step up its recycling commitments.

"After the pressure, they became very public about their position," Andrew Dobbs, programs director for TCE in Central Texas, told Resource Recycling. "Now we are working to press the entire industry to improve the proposed legislation by setting more ambitious targets for collection and ensuring that batteries are recovered for the highest and best uses, not downcycling."

The news comes as officials in Connecticut are beginning to develop legislation that would require battery makers to fund the recycling of batteries in the state. While no new bill has been unveiled, it is likely some form of legislation will surface in 2015.

Connecticut was the site of a major dialogue between numerous stakeholders, including the Corporation for Battery Recycling, a pro-legislation group formed by Duracell, Energizer and Panasonic. Rayovac had been an early participant in the group before opting out shortly after the Corporation's formation in 2011.

Outside of its newly published position on legislation, the Rayovac website does make it clear that household batteries are not considered hazardous waste by the U.S. EPA.

"Household batteries … are not hazardous waste. They are qualified as non-hazardous after having undergone government required testing." the post reads.


To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

NRC elects a new board

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:47
NRC elects a new board

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Oct. 1, 2014

The National Recycling Coalition has voted 10 board members into the fold.

Elections for the board were held during the 2014 Resource Recycling Conference in New Orleans. The new and re-elected members, listed below, will each serve 3-year terms:

 

  • Gary Bilbro, president, NewGreen Consulting LLC
  • Jack DeBell, development director, University of Colorado Recycling
  • John Frederick, executive director, Intermunicipal Relations Committee
  • David Juri Freeman, recycling program manager, city and county of Denver
  • Marjorie Griek, executive director, Colorado Association for Recycling
  • Doug Hill, president, EcoVision Environmental
  • Gary Liss, zero-waste consultant, Gary Liss & Associates
  • Antonio Rios, president, Puerto Rico Recycling Coalition
  • Will Sagar, executive director, Southeast Recycling Development Center
  • Michael Van Brunt, director of sustainability, Covanta

 

The recently voted-in individuals join the following active members:

 

  • Susan Collins, president, Container Recycling Institute
  • Jeffrey Cooper, AECC Group
  • Maggie Clark, zero waste planning and adjunct professor, Maggie Clarke Environmental
  • Mark Lichtenstein, executive director, Center for Sustainable Community Solutions, Syracuse University
  • Stephen London, marketing director, ReCommunity
  • Fran McPoland, government relations, Paper Recycling Coalition & 100 Percent Recycled Paper Alliance
  • Michelle Minstrell, project manager, Waste Management Sustainability Services
  • Maite Quinn, business development and marketing manager
  • Julie Rhodes, Julie Rhodes Consulting
  • Lisa Skumatz, principal, Skumatz Economic Research Associates & Econservation Institute
  • Robin Wiener, president, Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

 

Ex-officio members include Michele Nestor, president of Nestor Resources, Inc., Cliff Case of Carter, Ledyard & Milburn, LLC and Murray Fox with i-ROC.

It was a busy week for NRC. Numerous awards were given out as well as NRC's longstanding Murray J. Fox Scholarships, which went to three students from nearby Tulane University.

The group also worked to hammer out a definition of recycling with the help of sustainability thought-leader William McDonough.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Programs in action

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:38
Programs in action

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Oct. 1, 2014

We hit Florida, Minnesota and Chicago in our look at recent developments in municipal recycling and composting.

Officials in St. Petersburg, Florida are set to approve a $6.5 million loan to finance the introduction of citywide single-stream recycling. While the expansion won't require residents to actually recycle, they will be charged about $3 each month for the added service. Just about 10 percent of city residents currently sign up for recycling services.

Residents in St. Paul, Minnesota have so far been taking advantage of their single-stream recycling services. First introduced in April, single-stream has led to a 16 percent increase in collection volumes even though the city is putting off plans to switch from bins to carts until at least next year.

A pilot composting program in the Chicago suburb of Oak Park appears to be flourishing. The 725 households served by the voluntary food scraps program are sending about 2,300 pounds of material each week to Waste Management's Romeoville facility. The service, which is the first of its kind in Illinois, costs residents $14 per month.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 11:36
NewsBits

Oct. 1, 2014

Haulers servicing Metro Vancouver were fined nearly half of a million dollars last year. The violations, which were concentrated among some of the leading firms in the area, including Waste Management, stemmed from too many recyclables ending up in the trash, according to waste auditors. Metro Vancouver views it as the haulers' responsibility to educate residents on what should and shouldn't go in the trash.

California's landmark plastic bag ban legislation has been signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown. Brown's seal of approval means the bag ban will go into effect in July of 2015 and will eventually ban all single-use checkout bags from grocery and convenience stores throughout the state. "We’re the first to ban these bags, and we won’t be the last," Brown said at the signing.

Recycling-savvy residents in Charleston, South Carolina will be eligible to win free $50 gift certifications from Harris Teeter for the next six months. The initiative, which is part of Coca-Cola's "Recycling & Win" program, is aimed at recognizing "households which are recycling properly" ‒ in other words, recycling as much as possible and only those items Charleston's curbside program accepts.

Scotland has fallen short of its own admittedly hard-to-reach 2013 recycling goals. Scotland's 32 local authorities collectively reached a 42 percent recycling and composting rate during the year, one percentage point above 2012's final number but well short of a countrywide 50 percent goal.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

EPA seeks input on key e-scrap issues

E-Scrap News Magazine - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:36
EPA seeks input on key e-scrap issues

By Jerry Powell, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency convened a meeting of some 50 key electronics recycling parties last week near Washington, D.C. to receive advice and input. The meeting — the first "EPA Summit on Electronics" since 2005 — included representatives of original equipment manufacturers, states, nonprofit organizations, e-scrap reclaimers and trade groups.

The two-day session focused on two concerns. EPA sought input on CRT recycling management, including a review of how obsolete CRTs are being handled and how current and future problems can be addressed. Included at the meeting were executives from major CRT processors, including Closed Loop Refining and Recovery, Kuusakoski, Nulife Glass and Universal Recycling Technologies.

The stakeholder group assessed the current CRT recycling landscape, with attention focused on collection and handling practices by e-scrap firms and others. The attendees then analyzed the advantages and challenges associated with different CRT recycling options, including use of CRT glass in ceramics and concrete; the recovery of lead from CRTs in de-leading furnaces and lead and copper smelters; the chemical extraction of the lead through leaching; and CRT reuse. Discussion also centered on the use of CRT glass as alternative daily cover in landfills and the storage of CRTs in monofills.

The general consensus generated at the meeting is that obsolete CRTs are backing up in the current recovery system and additional abandoned stockpiles may occur. Some participants urged EPA to adopt a more forceful position in terms of its "speculative accumulation" rule and to increase its regulatory efforts with states to address any future problems.

The participants then generated a set of recommendations for future government-industry efforts in CRT and hazardous materials management, including the development of best practices guidance and new permitting standards for legitimate long-term CRT storage. The stakeholders at the meeting recommended that this work be expanded to include hazardous materials management issues arising from the processing of copiers and flat-panel displays.

The second focus of the meeting was sustainable electronics. Much of the discussion targeted two issues: design of electronics for reuse, repair and recycling, and better ways to determine what makes a firm a "good recycler." In terms of the first concern, the group recommended a number of government and industry actions take place involving electronics designers, software producers and e-scrap reclaimers. For the second issue, the participants want to see a mass-balance tracking system for recyclable materials developed and sample model contract language generated for those wanting to assure environmentally sound recycling.

EPA is eager to get input from others on the Summit recommendations. Agency officials are inviting those interested in CRT management to an open meeting on Oct. 23 in Orlando from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. at a session immediately following the E-Scrap 2014 conference. This will be followed by a sustainable electronics open meeting at the hotel from 3:00 to 4:30 PM. To sign up for these free sessions, here.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

E-Scrap 2014: Attack of the tablets

E-Scrap News Magazine - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:33
E-Scrap 2014: Attack of the tablets

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

As gadgets have transitioned from our desks to our laps to our hands, processors and refurbishers have had to deal with new challenges to effectively dismantle or repair.

At E-Scrap 2014, a number of presentations will help attendees better understand how form factor changes are having an impact on the used electronics sector. Presenters will also offer potential solutions in product design and repairability.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies. Get all the latest information and register to attend here.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

Creative Recycling Systems founder Jon Yob breaks his silence

E-Scrap News Magazine - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:31
Creative Recycling Systems founder Jon Yob breaks his silence

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

After a multimillion dollar lawsuit was dismissed late last week, the founder of a troubled East Coast e-scrap firm has gone on the offensive.

In a 10-paragraph statement issued to E-Scrap News, Jon Yob, the founder and former CEO and president of Creative Recycling Systems (CRS), lays the blame for the recent collapse of his former firm at the feet of Intersection One LLC, the investor group that purchased CRS from Yob in 2012.

"Things didn't work as they promised," Yob writes. "The company slowly came apart — for many reasons."

Yob was until recently being sued by Intersection One for allegedly overstating the value of CRS at the time of the acquisition in 2012. That lawsuit, court records show, was dismissed "without prejudice of all claims alleged or asserted" on Sept. 26.

In his statement, which was issued in the wake of the suit dismissal, Yob asserts that Rick Bates, the CEO installed by Intersection One, "had absolutely no recycling industry experience" and that a series of bad business decisions were made "without my approval." Yob claims "the purchase contract [between himself and Intersection One] clearly stated that any changes would need my consent."

Yob adds the company's abandonment of "an industry-leading technique to process and recycle CRT glass" led to "millions of pounds of unprocessed CRT glass sitting in warehouses."

A recent report indicated more than 30 million pounds of CRT glass are being held at CRS sites in six states.

The legal team for Intersection One did not return a request for comment on Yob's assertions.

The Intersection One suit alleged that Yob misrepresented the value of CRS when the firm was sold. "Defendants led the Investors to believe that CRS was a profitable, large-scale, stable company with healthy cash flow," the lawsuit read. "What Defendants failed to disclose to the Investors was that this depiction of CRS was premised upon abject, widespread and systemic fraud."

According to the lawsuit, Yob claimed his company was worth $55 million, while its true value was "approximately $20 million."

Yob now claims he was the one misled. "In 2013, I reinvested some of my own money into Creative Recycling based on representations the group made to me," he states in his recent comments. "Turns out, those representations weren't accurate."

Asked whether he would file a lawsuit against Intersection One, Yob told E-Scrap News, "All legal options remain on the table."

CRS as a company still faces struggles. In a separate lawsuit, a Florida-based bank has sued the company for almost $19 million it says it is owed. Creative has since gone into receivership and filed for bankruptcy as it looks to close locations and sell off any salvageable assets.

The company operated three processing locations and numerous e-scrap collection hubs, most of which were concentrated throughout the East Coast.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Wide world of e-scrap

E-Scrap News Magazine - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:27
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

UK regulators issue fines for end-of-life electronics that were bound for Africa. That story leads our global look at the industry.

A total of 11 containers of e-scrap bound for Africa were recently intercepted at UK ports by the Environment Agency. The containers, which were said to carry mostly old television sets, have been linked to a handful of Tyneside companies who either failed to label the items for reuse or deliberately attempted to ship off the devices without paying for "proper end-of-life treatment." Six individuals have been fined about $5,700 in all.

Rwanda appears to be on the verge of developing its own e-scrap policy. An environmental fund will contribute $1.3 million to help the African nation organize a national e-scrap strategy, and plans are also in place to fund the building of an e-scrap processing center.

Computer maker Dell has agreed on a 5-year deal with the United Nations to develop e-scrap recycling infrastructure in Africa, Asia and Latin America. According to a report by Forbes, the partners will aim to build processing sites in each region to handle e-scrap, although financial terms of the alignment and potential investment have not been disclosed.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:25
Certification scorecard

Sept. 30, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

ZRG LLC of Carlsbad, California is now certified to the R2:2013 and RIOS standards.

EnviroShred NW of Portland, Oregon; Proshred Security of Albany, New York; Shred Guard (serving Atlantic Canada) of Saint John, New Brunswick; Shredall Ltd. of Nottingham, England; and Shred Doc Destr dba Balcones Shred of Austin, Texas have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, EPC's E-Scrap Processing Center of Earth City, Missouri has renewed their NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization as well as Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

E-Scrap 2014: Connect with all the key vendors

E-Scrap News Magazine - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:22
E-Scrap 2014: Connect with all the key vendors

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

The bustling trade show hall at E-Scrap 2014 will feature more than 100 leading industry companies that can take your business to new levels. And by connecting with potential partners and suppliers in one spot, you save valuable time and resources.

Exhibiting companies include electronics scrap processors, buyers and brokers, equipment manufacturers, waste haulers, industry trade associations and more. In addition, the trade show at E-Scrap 2014 will open a day earlier than in years past. The hall will open Tuesday, Oct. 21, and hours that initial day will be 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. The hall will also be open for all your networking needs on Wednesday, Oct. 22 and Thursday, Oct. 23.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to secure your spot at this fall's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.


To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

.

.