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E-Scrap 2015: Your Labor Day is safe

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:38
E-Scrap 2015: Your Labor Day is safe

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Dec. 4, 2014

E-Scrap 2015 is scheduled to take place earlier than in years past – Sept. 1-3, 2015. But fear not, beach goers and grill masters: You won't have to decide between maintaining Labor Day weekend traditions and attending the best networking event in electronics recycling.

In 2015, Labor Day is Sept. 7, the week after E-Scrap 2015. That means you can get to the conference, be home in time to share all you learned with colleagues and then have your usual Labor Day fun. (Or maybe you can use that weekend to reach out to all the potential partners you connected with at the conference!)

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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Illinois amendment aims to fix e-scrap program

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:35
Illinois amendment aims to fix e-scrap program

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 4, 2014

Elected officials in Illinois are mulling an amendment to the state's e-scrap legislation that would lead to higher manufacturer recycling goals and protections for local governments.

Introduced by Rep. Emily McAsey, a Democrat representing Illinois' 85th District, the legislation picked up four chief co-sponsors in recent weeks following a reading in the Illinois House Environmental Committee.

“If some changes are not made, I’m concerned [some programs] will cease to be able to operate,” McAsey said during the meeting, according to the Joliet, Illinois-based Herald News. “There’s the possibility of widespread illegal dumping [of electronics].”

Rep. McAsey did not return a request for comment from E-Scrap News.

At its core, McAsey's amendment would signal three significant changes to the state program currently in place. The first change would be to double the current manufacturer recycling requirement from 50 percent to 100 percent of what each company sells in the state. (Individual manufacturer goals are based on sales of electronics in the state "two years before the applicable year," the law states.) In addition, the legislation would stiffen the penalty against OEMs failing to reach that 100 percent goal. The legislation also aims to ensure recycling firms and collectors don't charge municipalities for collecting or taking material unless they offer specialized services, such as home pick-up.

Mark Denzler, vice president and chief operating officer of the Illinois Manufacturers' Association (IMA), told E-Scrap News the group opposes the amendment but will engage in talks next year as part of a planned review of the program set forth by current legislation.

"The IMA opposes the current amendment that requires manufacturers to double their goals and significantly increase costs for the collection of e-waste," Denzler said. "The original law was carefully negotiated and includes a mandatory review of the program in 2015. Our members are committed to sitting down with Rep. McAsey and local government officials to review the overall e-waste program with a goal of making it better for both manufacturers and consumers."

One of the main challenges of the current legislative framework, proponents of the amendment say, is that manufacturer goals, at 50 percent, are too low and leave towns and cities with excess electronics to recycle. With CRT devices representing the vast majority of the end-of-life consumer electronics stream by weight in Illinois (and nationwide), that excess material is costly to process and responsibly recycle, causing municipalities to discontinue collection programs. Recycling firms, meanwhile, have begun to avoid the residential stream.

"We already have millions of people without service," Marta Keane, a recycling specialist for Will County, told E-Scrap News. She said Will County's recycling contractor, Vintage Tech, has continued to service the area despite no longer receiving manufacturer funding to do so, while numerous other counties, Keane noted, including DuPage County, are now without service. "Any day we could lose service," Keane said.

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PC shipments expected to finish 2014 down 2.7 percent

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:31
PC shipments expected to finish 2014 down 2.7 percent

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Dec. 4, 2014

With the year coming to a close, 2014 global shipment expectations for PCs, tablets and smartphones are in, giving the industry a glimpse of the consumer electronics waste stream to come.

PC shipments worldwide during 2014 appear to have been higher than originally expected. For the year, the International Data Corporation (IDC) is now expecting a 2.7 percent drop in shipments from 2013 compared to original expectations of a 3.7 percent drop.

In total, IDC says 163.9 million PCs will ship worldwide during 2014. Looking ahead to 2018, IDC says 161.9 units will ship, with mature and emerging markets continuing to veer toward tablets and smartphones.

On the tablet front, IDC is estimating a 7.2 percent growth rate for the year in overall shipments. That growth rate, while still positive, is far behind 2013's torrid year-over-year growth rate of 52.5 percent. IDC says to expect 235.7 million tablets to ship worldwide in 2014.

By 2018, IDC anticipates 285.9 million units will ship annually.

From a percentage point perspective, smartphone shipments grew the most in 2014. Up 26.3 percent over 2013 shipments, smartphone shipments are anticipated to reach 1.3 billion units this year.

IDC predicts 1.4 billion smartphone units should ship in 2015, while 2018 will see as many as 1.9 billion units. The research firm has not released a 2015 forecast for PCs or tablets.


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Survey says … discrepancy

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:28
Survey says … discrepancy

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Dec. 4, 2014

What percentage of Americans are actively bringing old devices to recycling outlets? It depends whose numbers you go by.

A survey by office supply chain Staples indicates 92 percent of Americans have a TV, 72 percent have a laptop and 70 percent have a smartphone. In addition, the survey found just 8 percent of respondents recycled unwanted devices, with the majority of those gadgets (24 percent) collecting dust in American closets and basements.

Those figures seem to contrast the data of another recent survey, one released last month by the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA). That study found that a much higher percentage of Americans – 30 percent – had recycled at least one electronic device in the past year.

For more on CEA's study, click here.

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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:27
Certification scorecard

Dec. 4, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

The San Antonio facility of Advanced Technology Recycling is now certified to the ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards.

Battery Solutions of Howell, Michigan is now certified to the R2:2013 and RIOS standards.

Call2Recycle, Inc. of Atlanta is now certified to the R2:2013 standard.

1st Choice Document Destruction, Inc. of Milaca, Minnesota; The Arc of Madison County Shredding Svc. of Huntsville, Alabama; ATI SecureDocs of Atlanta; Data Shredding Services of Texas, Inc. of Houston; Data Shredding Services of Texas, Inc. III of San Antonio; Goodwill So CA San Bernardino of San Bernardino, California; Hanna Paper Recycling, Inc. of Mansfield, Massachusetts; InfoShield LLC of Englewood, New Jersey; Kent Record Management – Muskegon of Muskegon, Michigan; Land Shark Shredding, LLC of Bowling Green, Kentucky; Proshred of Northern Virginia of Sterling, Virginia; Shred Right (A Rohn Industries Co.) of St. Paul, Minnesota; Shred With Us of West Columbia, South Carolina; The Shredders of Commerce, California; and Shred Defense of Richmond, California have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Cascade Asset Management of Madison, Wisconsin and Cascade Asset Management – Indianapolis of Indianapolis have achieved their NAID Certifications for Hard Drive Sanitization as well as Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:21
NewsBits

Dec. 4, 2014

According to Materials Recycling World, Sims Recycling Solutions is implementing its strategy to reduce its processing footprint in the U.K. (subscription required). The firm’s e-scrap plant in Newport, Wales should be fully closed by early 2015, with some 100 workers being released. One other U.K. plant will be shuttered and another facility will see reduced operations. The company earlier this year made it clear a U.K. consolidation was forthcoming.

Recent research shows a combination of two sorting technologies is effective in separating plastics from obsolete electronics, especially those plastics containing brominated fire retardants. Two researchers at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy tested a new way to detect bromine compounds in plastics. Rosa Taurino and Maria Cannio found that X-ray spectroscopy alone can estimate bromine concentrations, although with a degree of uncertainty. Taurino and Cannio determined that using Raman spectroscopy along with X-ray spectroscopy improved sortation accuracy to a purity level that complies with new European hazardous substances regulations.

Clover Holdings, an electronics reseller and refurbisher based in Illinois, is the subject of a feature over at Crain's Chicago Business journal. The publication highlights Clover's quick rise from a $1.7 million recycling firm to a $1 billion reseller and refurb hub. The company's latest moves has been a drive to take gently used models of the iPhone from customers and businesses upgrading to the iPhone 6.

E-scrap is the subject of a recent Newsweek article by reporter Lauren Walker. Walker primarily looks to the growing amounts of it we, as individuals and as a country, produce and the challenges and opportunities that poses for the recycling industry. "Transparency is key to responsible recycling," John Shegerian, CEO of Electronic Recyclers International, tells the publication. To read the article in its entirety, click here.

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APR raises concerns over two possible labeling actions

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 11:03
APR raises concerns over resin code redesign

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers has voiced concern about two developments in plastics identification that could have significant recycling implications.

APR's November newsletter, which was sent out by email Nov. 21, featured an update from Dave Cornell, technical consultant for the group, on discussions currently being led by global standards organization ASTM International. The worries center on ASTM members potentially redrafting the resin code symbol and labeling plastics with degradable additives as "landfill degradable."

Those conversations are being had in two separate subcommittees of ASTM's 700-member-strong D 20 plastics committee.

ASTM voluntary standards are developed through member dialogue, and Cornell noted current APR participation in D 20 subcommittee groups needs to improve.

"APR member involvement is greatly needed," Cornell wrote. "There are currently parties involved that can outvote APR in both subcommittees."

In subcommittee D 20.95, ASTM is actively reviewing a redesign of the plastics resin code, which would essentially replace the chasing arrows design with a "solid line triangle." APR's concern, according to Cornell, lies in the fact that the current conversation does not include the resin codes themselves. Cornell stated APR member input is needed to stress the importance of introducing additional codes and/or officially including new resin formulations in the established Nos. 1-7 system.

"Is PETG a No. 1, or, if not, what?" Cornell asked. "For HDPE and PP, we have the same questions."

Meanwhile, Cornell explained, ASTM's subcommittee D 20.96 is undertaking a separate discussion surrounding degradable plastics. At present, ASTM is pondering support for a "landfill degradable" symbol on plastic products made with degradable additives. APR is opposed to the measure, Cornell stated, noting the group is against degradable additive use altogether until it can be demonstrated additives do not negatively affect the quality of the plastics recycling stream.

"We consider an ASTM standard that allows declaration of landfill degradability to be a significant issue unless 'no harm done' has been shown per our tests," Cornell wrote.

ASTM's D 20 plastics committee meets twice a year, in April and November, with three days of technical meetings. Joining the committee costs $75.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: The view from the top

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:59
Plastics Recycling 2015: The view from the top

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

Attendees of the upcoming Plastics Recycling 2015 conference will have a great chance to stay ahead of the competition by getting first-hand perspectives from the top brass of four leading plastics recycling trade associations.

Plastics Recycling 2015 will showcase a facilitated dialogue between Steve Alexander (Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers), Bill Carteaux (SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association), Steve Russell (American Chemistry Council) and Robin Wiener (Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries). These experts will tackle questions on topics such as North America's evolving waste stream, dynamic resin markets, the current business environment for plastics recycling and the ways sustainability goals are affecting the industry.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. More than 1775 attendees from 30 countries were on hand at the 2014 edition, and a similar turnout is expected in Dallas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Container deposit in Oregon will likely double

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:57
Container deposit in Oregon will likely double

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

A recent webinar on Oregon's beverage deposit program highlighted both the advances and challenges of the nation's longest standing bottle redemption program.

Hosted by the Container Recycling Institute (CRI) as part of its ongoing webinar series, the session featured presentations from Peter Spendelow with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, John Andersen with the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative (OBRC) and Clayton Kyle from software developer and recycling firm CLYNK. The webinar was moderated by CRI's president, Susan Collins.

Both Spendelow and Andersen ceded the state isn't meeting legislative expectations when it comes to redemption rates.

At about 71 percent, the redemption rate "is not very good," Spendelow said.

If Oregon fails to reach an 80 percent redemption rate for two years in a row, an automatic doubling of the deposit amount will go into effect in 2017. That would mean a dime bounty on covered bottles and cans, up from the current five-cent deposit.

"I'm nearly certain we won't get to 80 percent, barring a miracle, so it's very likely [a] 10 cent [container deposit] will occur in Oregon and that would be in January of 2017," Andersen said.

Part of the challenge, according to Spendelow, comes down to the state's strong curbside recycling network, which makes it easier for consumers to toss their beverage containers in the bin instead of redeeming them at stores and redemption centers. Though containers recovered through curbside systems are counted in the state's container recycling rate, they do not count toward the redemption rate.

Spendelow noted the addition of water bottles as another issue facing redemption rates. With consumption of water bottles often occurring outside of the home, consumers typically dispose of them wherever possible, including via public space trash cans.

A third major deterrent noted by Spendelow and Andersen is the poor consumer redemption experience at grocery stores that act as redemption sites.

Unlike most other deposit programs in the U.S., Oregon's program does not provide a "handling fee" to redemption sites. Grocery stores are required to offer redemption services and swallow whatever maintenance and service costs come along with it.

"The result has been a worsening of redemption experience for consumers," Spendelow suggested. "A grocer in Oregon gets nothing out of the process other than providing good customer service."

As a result, those redemption areas aren't always as clean or welcoming as consumers would like.

"It's a combination of the value you get when you return your container versus the effort and muck you go through to get it," Andersen said.

Those difficulties aside, the program has benefited from a solution of sorts, webinar participants noted. OBRC, a beverage industry co-op owned by local distributors and bottlers, has started rolling out "BottleDrop" redemption centers throughout the state to phase out nearby grocery store options. While generally considered less convenient than redemption services offered at grocery stores, the BottleDrop sites have been successful both in terms of getting more containers and improving the customer experience.

According to Andersen, the 10 redemption centers up and running in Oregon now account for 30 percent of the state's redemption volume. That's compared to the 10 percent pulled in by grocery stores that were permitted to stop offering redemption services if they were within a few miles of the new hubs.

The BottleDrop centers have benefited from software developed by CLYNK, a Maine-based company that's provided Oregon its consumer-facing program. Under the CLYNK system, Oregon residents coming into redemption centers can easily redeem containers and automatically pool redemption fees into a CLYNK account, which can be turned into cash or used at checkout at grocery stores.

OBRC expects to build 35 more centers in the next nine years, closing approximately 200 to 300 of the 3,000 grocery store redemption areas now in place, Andersen said. While it won't replace the grocery store model altogether, Andersen hopes the redemption center model will help increase overall consumer experience.

"Industry has been proactive in providing solutions and as retailers and distributors, we care about the recycling of containers," Andersen said.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Recycling of ag plastics on the rise

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:53
Recycling of ag plastics on the rise

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Dec. 3, 2014

Representatives of the agricultural plastics recycling industry say activity in their sector has been growing in 2014.

According to the Ag Container Recycling Council (ACRC) and CropLife America, recovery efforts in 2014 are expected to divert 10 million pounds of agricultural container-based plastics. That would represent a 10 percent increase over 2013 efforts, which diverted about 9 million pounds of the material.

ACRC says the group has helped recycle 150 million pounds of agricultural plastics over the past 22 years.

The field has seen increased investment of late on both ends of the country. In May, Florida Agricultural Plastic Recyclers announced an expansion of its 65,000 square foot Avon Park facility. In August of 2013, Command Packaging opened a plant in Salinas, California with the aim of recovering 100,000 pounds of ag plastics per year to use in making reusable plastic bags.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled frac melt HDPE falls

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:51
PetroChem Wire: Recycled frac melt HDPE falls

Dec. 3, 2014

Recycled HDPE homopolymer (dairy) fell 1 cent per pound during the week ended Nov. 21 to 84-86 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast.

Black and mixed color post-consumer FM copolymer grades also dropped a penny, as did post-industrial grades of FM copolymer HDPE. Black and mixed color regrind was down 2-2.5 cents per pound.

Weak demand ahead of the holiday period was cited for the price erosion. Lower prime polyethylene prices also were seen contributing to the softness in recycled PE. U.S .Gulf spot blow mold HDPE, for instance, fell 3 cents per pound to 76.5 cents per pound from Nov. 13 to Nov. 20.

HDPE post-consumer dairy repro, meanwhile, fell 3 cents per pound the last week in November as a large-volume seller cleared out higher priced inventory and booked orders for late November and December. Business was reported at 79-85 cents per pound FOB Southern U.S., down from 84-86 cents per pound a week earlier.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 10:47
NewsBits

Dec. 3, 2014

Recent research shows a combination of two sorting technologies is effective in separating plastics from obsolete electronics, especially those plastics containing brominated fire retardants. Two researchers at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy tested a new way to detect bromine compounds in plastics. Rosa Taurino and Maria Cannio found that X-ray spectroscopy alone can estimate bromine concentrations, although with a degree of uncertainty. Taurino and Cannio determined that using Raman spectroscopy along with X-ray spectroscopy improved sortation accuracy to a purity level that complies with new European hazardous substances regulations.

A county in Nova Scotia is adding expanded polystyrene (EPS) to its curbside recycling program. The first county to do so, Kings County will recycle that curbside collected material using a typical densification process through a partnership between Valley Waste Resource Management and Scotia Recycling Limited.

An indictment could be imminent for the owner of a Canadian plastics recycling firm and a pair of brokers accused of illegally shipping hazardous waste to the Philippines. After a review of the case, Canada's Department of Justice has recommended the indictment of Adelfa Eduardo, said to be the owner of Chronic Plastics, and brokers Sherjun Saldon and Leonora Flores for their involvement in allegedly shipping 50 containers of plastic mixed with garbage and hazardous waste to the Philippines. The type of hazardous waste contained in the cargo is not known at this time.

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Container deposit in Oregon likely to rise from a nickel to a dime

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 12:13
Container deposit in Oregon likely to rise from a nickel to a dime

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Dec. 2, 2014

A recent webinar on Oregon's beverage deposit program highlighted both the advances and challenges of the nation's longest standing bottle redemption program.

Hosted by the Container Recycling Institute (CRI) as part of its ongoing webinar series, the session featured presentations from Peter Spendelow with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, John Andersen with the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative (OBRC) and Clayton Kyle from software developer and recycling firm CLYNK. The webinar was moderated by CRI's president, Susan Collins.

Both Spendelow and Andersen ceded the state isn't meeting legislative expectations when it comes to redemption rates.

At about 71 percent, the redemption rate "is not very good," Spendelow said.

If Oregon fails to reach an 80 percent redemption rate for two years in a row, an automatic doubling of the deposit will go into effect in 2017. That would mean a dime bounty on covered bottles and cans.

"I'm nearly certain we won't get to 80 percent, barring a miracle, so it's very likely [a] 10 cent [container deposit] will occur in Oregon and that would be in January of 2017," Andersen said.

Part of the challenge, according to Spendelow, comes down to the state's strong curbside recycling network, which makes it easier for consumers to toss their beverage containers in the bin instead of redeeming them at stores and redemption centers. Though containers recovered through curbside systems are counted in the state's container recycling rate, they do not count toward the redemption rate.

In addition, Spendelow noted the addition of water bottles as another issue facing redemption rates. With consumption of water bottles often occurring outside of the home, consumers typically dispose of them wherever possible, including at public space trash cans.

Another major deterrent noted by both Spendelow and Andersen is the poor consumer redemption experience at those grocery stores.

Unlike most other deposit programs in the U.S., Oregon's program does not provide a "handling fee" to redemption sites. Grocery stores are required to offer redemption services and swallow whatever maintenance and service costs come along with it.

"The result has been a worsening of redemption experience for consumers," Spendelow suggested. "A grocer in Oregon gets nothing out of the process other than providing good customer service."

As a result, those redemption areas aren't always as clean or welcoming as consumers would like.

"It's a combination of the value you get when you return your container versus the effort and muck you go through to get it," Andersen said

Those difficulties aside, the program has benefited from a solution of sorts, webinar participants noted. OBRC, a beverage industry co-op owned by local distributors and bottlers, has started rolling out "BottleDrop" redemption centers throughout the state to phase out nearby grocery store options. While generally considered less convenient than redemption services offered at grocery stores, the BottleDrop sites have been successful both in terms of getting more containers and improving the customer experience.

According to Andersen, the 10 redemption centers up and running in Oregon now account for 30 percent of the state's redemption volume. That's compared to the 10 percent nearby grocery stores had been pulling in, which were allowed to close if within a few miles of the new hubs.

The BottleDrop centers have benefited from software developed by CLYNK, a Maine-based company that's lent Oregon its consumer-facing program to use. Under the CLYNK system, Oregon residents coming into redemption centers can easily redeem containers and automatically pool redemption fees into a CLYNK account, which can be turned into cash or used at checkout at grocery stores.

OBRC expects to build 35 more centers in the next nine years, closing approximately 200 to 300 of the 3,000 grocery store redemption areas now in place, Andersen said. While it won't replace the grocery store model altogether, Andersen hopes the redemption center model will help increase overall consumer experience.

"Industry has been proactive in providing solutions and as retailers and distributors, we care about the recycling of containers," Andersen said.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Save the date

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 12:00
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Save the date

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Dec. 2, 2014

The premier gathering of top recycling executives and program coordinators is set for next September in Indianapolis. Start planning now to ensure you are in on the material diversion dialogues that matter.

The Resource Recycling Conference will include sessions on the topics that matter to recycling professionals right now – dirty MRFs, Chinese commodities markets, the Closed Loop Fund and the Recycling Partnership, and much more.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Flurry of product stewardship news hits industry

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 11:30
Flurry of product stewardship news hits industry

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Dec. 2, 2014

In recent weeks, several states and national groups have pushed forward product stewardship developments. Our rundown will get you up to speed on the latest when it comes to manufacturers handling end-of-life responsibilities for the products they make.

Recycling Reinvented branches out

Recycling Reinvented has announced it is expanding its mission and advocacy work. Originally formed as a group dedicated to promoting extended producer responsibility to increase state and nationwide recycling rates, Recycling Reinvented will now also push for "supportive policies."

"Recycling Reinvented has heard from companies that they’re willing to support other policy ideas to increase quality collection and processing of recyclables," Recycling Reinvented representatives write in a press release. "We could see some big results during legislative sessions starting in 2015.” The additional policies Recycling Reinvented says it will push for include unit-based pricing for solid waste (often called pay-as-you-throw), disposal bans on recyclables, recycling service provision requirements and commitment to funding local government needs for education and enforcement.

Minnesota's PaintCare program underway

Retailers throughout Minnesota are now collecting and recycling used paint. Having gone into effect Nov. 1, Minnesota's program, which is managed by the industry-backed PaintCare group, tacks on up to $1.60 for each unit of paint sold in the state and those consumer-generated funds are then used to pay for the collection and recycling of old paint. Thus far, 95 paint manufacturers have signed on to the program while an additional 120 stores are offering collection services. Jeremy Jones, PaintCare manager, recently told Minnesota's StarTribune he expects those numbers to continue to climb as the program gains momentum in the coming months and years. PaintCare has been tapped to manage paint take-back programs in seven other states in the U.S.

Mattress recycling legislation next for Minnesota?

With the paint program in full force, legislators in Minnesota are reportedly debating the merits of adding a law that would require a similarly funded mattress recycling program . With the cost of recycling end-of-life mattresses nearing $18 a pop, Minneapolis is spending more than $600,000 a year to keep them out of landfills. That may change if the legislature follows the lead of elected officials in Connecticut, Rhode Island and California by adding a recycling fee to the sale of new mattresses. Like paint makers now in the state, mattress makers would be tasked with providing collection and recycling options for consumers.

Carpet industry announces voluntary producer responsibility

The Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI) has unveiled plans to form a voluntary product stewardship program for carpets in 2015. The motive of the initiative, CRI announced at their annual meeting last month, is twofold: to find "market-based solutions to divert carpet from landfills and to quell extended producer responsibility (EPR) legislation." CRI will work with another carpet group, CARE, to roll out the program during the first quarter of 2015. The duo will work only in states currently without carpet legislation.

Upstream releases paper on increasing EPR interest

Following six months of intensive dialogue with local governments across the country, Upstream has officially released a discussion paper on the experience and some of the lessons learned. “Advancing Local Government’s Interests through Extended Producer Responsibility for Packaging" takes a look at the concerns raised by local governments about EPR and aims to put those issues to rest. “Potential reasons why local governments will be interested in this approach include the opportunities for higher performance, higher service-orientation, decreased government administration and costs, potentially lower and more equitable tax and ratepayer burdens on their citizens, and significant environmental benefits through increased recycling and better packaging design,” said Matt Prindiville, associate director for UPSTREAM and dialogue facilitator, in a press release. The paper can be read in full here.

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Waste management magazine to cease publishing

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 11:23
Waste management magazine to cease publishing

By Jerry Powell, Resource Recycling

Dec. 2, 2014

The garbage industry has lost another print magazine: Waste360.

Last year Crain Communications shuttered Waste & Recycling News, the 18-year-old biweekly with a circulation of approximately 47,000. Crain executives cited weakening ad sales as a key reason for the closure. Several observers noted that the continuing consolidation among waste hauling and disposal firms resulted in fewer equipment and service firms wanting to advertise in the waste management press.

This is likely a principal cause for the closure of Waste360 to occur at the end of 2014. The decades-old Penton monthly with a distribution of 28,000 copies had seen a decline in advertising of 30 percent in 2013 and more than 20 percent in this year, according to Resource Recycling analysis.

Company officials say Waste360 will now move to digital-only distribution. In addition to the periodical, Penton also offers several conferences and conventions focused on waste management, including Waste Expo, the industry’s largest trade show.

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Fewer waxed boxes means boost for OCC stream

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 11:21
Fewer waxed boxes means boost for OCC stream

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Dec. 2, 2014

The use of wax coatings on corrugated containers continues to decline, bringing added smiles to paper recovery firms.

The Corrugated Packaging Alliance reports waxed coating usage dropped below 3 percent of total corrugated paperboard consumption in the U.S. in 2013. This is approximately half the usage of wax coatings of a decade ago. Wax coatings preserve the strength of boxes when used for wet or iced applications, such as shipping fruit, vegetables, seafood, poultry and meat.

To date, some 47 different alternative coating applications have passed certification testing as to their repulpability and recyclability.

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Patent watch

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 11:20
Patent watch

Dec. 2, 2014

Chinook End-Stage Recycling Ltd., headquartered in Nottingham, Great Britain, was awarded Patent Application No. 20140215921 for a method of processing mixed waste via gasification.

Patent Application No. 20140217636, given to Aetrex Worldwide, Inc., from Teaneck, New Jersey, concerns methods of making products out of recycled materials including, but not limited to, scrap rubber materials.

Grand Rapids, Michigan company Cascade Engineering, Inc. was awarded Patent Application No. 20140217688 for a "high-profile, low-volume" recycling and garbage cart.

A method of recycling shredded asphalt is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140221708, awarded to a team of Berlin researchers, led by Jan-Niels Pochert.

Seoul-based Hyundai Motor Company was given Patent Application No. 20140223716 for a method of removing lamps from automobiles for recycling.

Patent Application No. 20140230619 was awarded to Ibbenburen, Germany-based BRT Recycling Technologie GmbH for a method of removing baling wire or other binding materials from baled goods, such as recyclables.

JJG IP Holdings, LLC, based in Hampstead, New Hampshire, was given Patent Application No. 20140244027, which describes an apparatus to sort recyclable materials.

A method for the removal of coatings from scrap metals, such as shredded wire, is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140231314, given to Werdohl, Germany's Hans-Bernd Pillkahn.

Patent Application No. 20140245577 was awarded to Rome's Agenzia Nazionale Per Le Nuove Tecnologie, L/Energ E Lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA) for a method of recycling scrap carbon fiber.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 11:15
NewsBits

Dec. 2, 2014

CalRecycle has awarded a total of $19.5 million to eight organics and recycling projects the state believes will cut down on greenhouse gas emissions. All told, the agency received 61 grant applications totaling $156 million in funding. The funds will be used to fund the construction or expansion of facilities and equipment upgrades.

Results from a new poll by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries show consumers are keeping an eye out for "green" products this holiday season and are willing to pay more for them. On average, two out of three poll participants said they look to see if a product is made with recycled content and are willing to pay 13 percent more, on average, if a product is recyclable and 10 percent more if it's made with recycled content.

A six-week pilot composting program in Iowa City has led to more than 1,000 pounds of food being diverted from area landfills. Fifty Iowa City families participated in the program and while there was not a noticeable decline in overall waste generation, the City is preparing to offer composting services citywide next year.

Sponsored by the Can Manufacturers Institute (CMI), this year's Great American Can Roundup led manufacturers to voluntarily collect 217,350 pounds of cans for recycling. Two of Rexam's Beverage Can North America offices combined to recycle almost 100,000 pounds of cans to take first and second place while Ball's Findlay, Ohio plant came in third with more than 35,000 pounds of cans recycled. "This challenge is an excellent platform for our members to come together and be great environmental stewards by recycling the same product they produce," CMI President Robert Budway states in the press release.

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Under regulatory pressure, Closed Loop explores options

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:54
Under regulatory pressure, Closed Loop explores options

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Nov. 21, 2014

Emerging CRT glass processor Closed Loop Refining and Recovery has announced it is initiating a program to send leaded CRT glass downstream.

In a statement sent to E-Scrap News, Closed Loop representatives say the firm will begin shipping leaded CRT glass stored in its Arizona and Ohio sites "to EPA-approved lead smelters, ceramic manufactures and glass-to-glass furnaces."

The move comes shortly after environmental officials in Arizona and Ohio took action in regards to the leaded glass Closed Loop had been accumulating.

"The initiation of this program is in response to recent actions from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources," writes David Cauchi, Closed Loop’s founder and CEO. "Both organizations felt that our handling of leaded glass cullet was outside EPA guidelines, and we intend to rectify that immediately to ensure that Closed Loop and our upstream partners continue to uphold all federal, state and local regulations."

Since its founding in 2010, Closed Loop has been accepting and storing leaded CRT glass at sites in Arizona and Ohio, with the eventual goal of building de-leading furnaces in both locations. No furnaces have become operational at either site.

The company has defended its storage practices as necessary in order to build sufficient feedstock for the furnaces once they are up and running, but regulators have taken issue with that approach.

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality recently issued a notice of violation to the company after an inspection of Closed Loop's Phoenix facility indicated the company was not adhering to the CRT rule, a federal regulation that requires firms to recycle or ship downstream at least 75 percent of their leaded CRT glass inventory by the end of each calendar year.

In a related move, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources announced last week its state electronics take-back program would not count pounds sent to Closed Loop as recycled unless the company began recycling glass itself or sending it downstream for further processing.

In their statement this week, Closed Loop representatives say the company has a goal of getting a furnace operational in Ohio next year.

"[Sending glass downstream] is a short-term measure designed to ensure compliance until the completion of Closed Loop’s proprietary leaded glass furnace in Columbus, currently slated for June 2015," the statement reads.

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