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Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 09/15/2014 - 11:19
NewsBits

Sept. 16, 2014

Beverage producers certainly do not want Massachusetts to expand its container deposit law. The Washington-based American Beverage Association has pumped $5 million into opposing the November ballot measure. This represents more than 90 percent of the funds garnered to beat the initiative. In comparison, proponents of adding containers to the system have raised $265,000, with the state chapter of the Sierra Club being the largest contributor at $144,000.

The data crunching site FiveThirtyEight recently published a compelling investigation of San Francisco's often cited 80 percent recycling rate. In the story, writer Carl Bialik points out that in 2013 the city actually sent more trash to landfill than it did in 2012, and he explains why achieving true zero waste may be beyond the capability of any modern municipality.

Seattle is considering instituting a system to levy fines on residents who do not properly divert material. Residents would be subject to a $1 charge each time they fail to separate compostable material, while businesses and multifamily buildings would have to pay $50 per offense after two warnings.

The National Waste & Recycling Association reports industry employment hit another all-time high in August. During that month, 382,500 individuals were employed in waste and recycling positions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Smartphones with big screens make big impact

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:57
Smartphones with big screens make big impact

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

With worldwide tablet shipments slightly lower than expected this year, devices that blend the tablet and phone concepts are picking up some of the slack.

Shipments of "phablets," defined by research firm IDC as mobile devices with screen sizes between 5.5 and 7 inches, are expected to reach 175 million units in 2014, 318 million units in 2015 and almost 600 million units by 2018.

That trend explains, at least in part, relatively sluggish shipments of tablets this year. While 2014 growth in tablets shipments was anticipated to reach 12 percent, IDC recently downgraded that expectation to 6.5 percent due to flat mature market demand.

Not surprisingly, Apple's new iPhone 6 will come in two screen sizes, the larger of which, the iPhone 6 Plus, comes with a 5.5 inch screen.

"With Apple expected to join the space in the coming weeks, we anticipate even more attention on phablets as larger screen smartphones become the new norm," said Melissa Chau, senior research manager with IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker.

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E-Scrap 2014: Can't-miss sessions

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:56
E-Scrap 2014: Can't-miss sessions

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

E-Scrap 2014 is just around the corner, and if you're still looking for motivation to register, just turn your attention to the conference's four headlining plenary sessions.

On Oct. 22, the leaders of five of the most important e-scrap firms in the country share their insights on the top industry challenges and the solutions they're pioneering. Next up that morning is a session that will dissect CRT recycling from three different angles, offering attendees the most complete picture possible on the CRT market today and what it might look like tomorrow.

Oct. 23 features a plenary session on e-scrap flows and where our scrap electronics of yesteryear are headed today. Later, attendees will hear from experts in the rare earth and critical metals space and learn how those sectors are evolving.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to make the most of this year's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.


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Major CRT tonnages left in Creative Recycling's wake

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:52
Major CRT tonnages left in Creative Recycling's wake

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

A new report on the state of Creative Recycling System's operations reveals approximately 30 million pounds of glass are stored at company sites in six states.

Filed on Sept. 4, the long-awaited inventory report culminates a month-long review of company operations by Creative's receiver, Robert Swett. With the company bankrupt and in search of a buyer — and also entangled in a multimillion dollar lawsuit — Swett's findings suggest a massive glass cleanup is in store.

According to the report, "approximately 30 million pounds of CRT glass inventory [is] stored in various locations throughout six states." Those states are Florida (approximately 6 million pounds), Illinois (1.5 million pounds), Kentucky (444,400 pounds), Maryland (7.6 million pounds), North Carolina (8.8 million pounds) and South Carolina (5.5 million pounds).

The Florida and North Carolina totals are spread between two facilities each, while the others represent single-facility stockpiles. There was no "legacy glass" found at the company's remaining locations in Connecticut, Georgia, New York or Tennessee, the report states.

Creative is hoping to have a bit more time to get its glass recycled. "CRS has recently applied to the six states for a variance from the 75 percent recycling requirement for 2014 in an effort to mitigate any penalties with not meeting the annual recycling requirement," Swett's report states. "This will alleviate CRS' efforts towards glass recycling, allowing it to focus cash on other areas within the company that are more immediate."

The CRT rule requires firms to recycle 75 percent of their glass inventory by the end of the year, but states can grant variances on a case-by-case basis.

The glass in need of processing includes "separated funnel and panel glass, mixed funnel and panel glass, and broken tubes with steel belts mixed in," Swett's report states. The company had been unable to pay for end-of-life recycling of glass "due to its liquidity crisis over the last 18 months."

With current per-pound recycling costs ranging from 6 to 15 cents, CRS will need to pay at least $1.8 million and as much as $4.5 million to send the glass downstream. The report cites costs ranging from 6 to 12 cents on the pound.

All that said, the report identifies three potential buyers that "have indicated a strong interest in the vertical integration of CRS into their model": Colt Refining and Recycling, Kuusakoski US and CIMMA Recycling. In addition, three private equity groups have also emerged as potential buyers for the firm, according to the report, with all interest deriving from CRS' "true differentiator — the balance maintained between the company's reuse and end-of-life businesses."

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Sprint tries to capitalize on trade-ins

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:49
Sprint tries to capitalize on trade-ins

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

Sprint has announced it will match or top any trade-in offer from its competitors as it aims to meet high collection and recycling goals.

The wireless carrier, which started its take-back program in 2001, is aiming "to collect an average of nine devices for every 10 devices sold by 2017." To do that, Sprint is attempting to make trading in old devices easier by matching any other offer from Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile.

"Our trade-in program is well known in the industry and when we guarantee the best value over any of our competitors, we’re taking this to another level," said David Owens, senior vice president-product, in the company's announcement. "Offering a competitive price match was the next logical step to ensure existing and new customers understood that we make our trade-in program a top priority and are willing to provide the very best value in the industry."

Sprint's Buyback program, which offers store and account credits of up to $300, also allows consumers to trade in up to five cellular devices per calendar year.

According to the company, more than 80 percent of traded-in devices are reused, while the remaining phones are sent for a recycling to "only certified recyclers." The carrier currently offers its buyback program in about 40 percent of its retail stores, a percentage that will likely need to increase dramatically to meet its 90 percent collection goal.

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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:48
Certification scorecard

Sept. 11, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Capitol Asset Recovery, Inc. of Lanham, Maryland is now certified to the e-Stewards, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards.

Reworx, a wholly owned social enterprise organization of the Nobis Works Foundation in Marietta, Georgia has achieved e-Stewards, ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OSHAS 18001 and R2:2013 certifications.

Access of Livermore, California; Access of Fife, Washington; Access of Sacramento, California; A.R.M.S. Inc. of DePere, Wisconsin; Business Records Management LLC of Wickliffe, Ohio; Data Shredding Services of Texas, Inc. II of Grapevine, Texas; Document Shredding & Storage of Amarillo, Texas; Lincoln Archives of Buffalo, New York; Rapid Shred LLC of Grandville, Michigan; Record Keepers LLC of Bismarck, North Dakota; The Shred Truck of St. Louis; and Time Shred Services (Shred Services, Inc.) of Hillside, New Jersey have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Lewis Clark Recyclers, Inc. of Lewiston, Idaho has renewed its NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization Operations and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:43
NewsBits

Sept. 11, 2014

The latest e-scrap collection numbers out of Washington continue to suggest 2014 will be the first year since program implementation that volumes are down. Through the first eight months of the year, Washington's producer-funded e-scrap program, E-Cycle Washington, has led to the collection of 29.5 million pounds of electronics, which is about 4 percent below 2013 January-August totals. Those numbers are giving rise to the hope that CRT tonnages in the state are beginning to plateau.

The U.S. EPA hosted a conference call on the CRT rule this week after a petition by consultancy TransparentPlanet netted more than 240 signatures in support of increased focus on enforcing the rule. While the call was not open to members of the media, TransparentPlanet has reflected on the session in a petition update, which urges members of the industry to sign and push the federal agency to action. Read it here.

While Guiyu, China has been etched in many minds as a toxic hub of the underground e-scrap world, a new report from PCWorld suggests things are beginning to change there. The cause of the shift, asserts reporter Michael Kan, is a new recycling plant outside of town that is helping to reduce hazardous activities such as the burning of electronics.


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Rhode Island takes on contaminated loads

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:51
Rhode Island takes on contaminated loads

By Dan Leif, Plastics Recycling Update

Sept. 11, 2014

The group that operates the only MRF in Rhode Island says it has seen significant increases in contamination over the last year, and it's starting to more frequently fine municipalities that send heavily tainted loads.

Starting last week, the quasi-public state organization Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation (RIRRC) began regularly enforcing a code in its municipal contracts that makes contaminated loads subject to a $250 fee.

RIRRC's director of recycling services, Sarah Kite, said three loads totaling roughly 22 tons brought in on Sept. 6 from the city of Cranston were rejected and hit with fines. In the past, RIRRC would issue only two or three contamination fines for an entire year.

"We're seeing a lot of food scraps," said Kite, "and also leaf and yard debris, construction and demolition debris, broken furniture, cables, ropes, textiles and more. The contaminated loads are just garbage."

Kite said the rise in contamination has come alongside the transition to single-stream collection in many of the state's larger municipalities. Currently, 14 towns and cities in Rhode Island offer automated single-stream pick-up of recyclables.

Kite said all was moving ahead smoothly until Providence, the state's capital and largest city with 225,000 people, switched to roll carts in 2013.

"Providence has the most to gain and the most to contribute, but what we're seeing unfortunately is they are causing the most problems," Kite said. "Looking back, I think the program needed to be implemented in phases. You start with different areas of the city and that way you can really target your educational efforts. The door-to-door was needed in a city as diverse as Providence."

Kite said RIRRC sent out notices to municipalities in early July alerting them to the fact the enforcement action would start up this month. She said the timing was tough because Labor Day weekend tends to be a time of heavy waste generation and thus improper use of recycling bins. But she thinks when towns and cities see the load rejection charges on their September bills, they will be quick to deepen communication with residents.

"Public works directors are saying, 'I need a stick,'" said Kite. "Hopefully, this will help them prove their point they need more ongoing education."

The RIRRC's MRF processes 130,000 tons of material per year. When a load dumped onto the tipping floor is deemed overly contaminated, it gets moved to the group's landfill, which is located nearby. Still, that step causes headaches for officials trying to keep pace with the materials stream.

"We're the only MRF in the state," Kite said. "We need to be operating 50 tons an hour and can't shut down."

Contamination also appears to be a concern in nearby New York City. A recent story cited 2014 data showing recycling violations up 47 percent six months through the year.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2014: The shifting scrap plastics landscape

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:47
Resource Recycling Conference 2014: The shifting scrap plastics landscape

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Sept. 11, 2014

A year after the peak of China's Green Fence customs crackdown, plenty of questions remain when it comes to the movement of recovered plastics.

Are recycling operations finding new domestic end market opportunities or sticking with the same foreign destinations? Will Chinese plastics processors set up facilities in the U.S.? What's the role of energy recovery technologies?

At next week's Resource Recycling Conference, attendees will get some answers to those plastic puzzlers. SPI's Recycling Committee has been exploring the complex relationship of export markets and the domestic plastics recycling industry, and industry expert Kim Holmes will share the results of this critical research.

Resource Recycling Conference 2014 is taking place next week at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Sept. 15-17. Head to rrconference.com for more information.


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Trex sees sales rise

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:43
Trex sees sales rise

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Sept. 11, 2014

The leading producer of wood-plastic composite products experienced a 23 percent jump in net sales to $121 million in the quarter ended June 30 over the previous year’s sales performance.

Trex’s net income for the period rose 15 percent to $15 million.

Trex produces recycled plastic lumber products at sites in Nevada and Virginia, with more than 400 employees working in more than 700,000 square feet of manufacturing space. Trex has more than $100 million in value in its property, plant and equipment.

The top three executives at the publicly traded company received a combined $4.7 million in compensation in the last fiscal year.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE prices firm in early September

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:41
PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE prices firm in early September

Sept. 11, 2014

Prices for many grades of recycled HDPE are firm in early September due in part to strong demand from the horticultural industry and resultant spot shortages.

HMW HDPE regrind drum prices were up 3 to 4 cents per pound the first week of the month, with business done at 55 cents per pound delivered Eastern U.S. (52 FOB). The same grade in pellet form sold as high as 62 cents per pound FOB Eastern U.S., also up 3 cents per pound from August.

Prices in Florida for flake and pellet forms of similar quality material were 3 to 5 cents per pound higher than eastern Midwest locations due to a shortage of trucks for deliveries into Florida.

In the prime resin market, U.S. Gulf spot blow mold HDPE held at 81 cents per pound from late August to early September.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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Putting film reclamation on a "Podium"

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:37
Putting film reclamation on a "Podium"

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Sept. 11, 2014

An ongoing industry effort to boost plastic film recovery is launching a new outreach effort.

The American Chemistry Council's Flexible Film Recycling Group (FFRG), along with Emerge Knowledge, has launched a campaign to enlist local governments in promoting and tracking their activities to increase the recycling of polyethylene (PE) film packaging.

The Re-Trac Wrap Recycling Action Program (WRAP) offers local governments access to resource tools to boost or establish film recovery activities in their communities and is centered around plasticfilmrecycling.org. Also, local governments and communities also can be recognized as WRAP champions through a mapping feature on the Re-Trac system.

Additionally, communities will be able to show their progress in increasing film recovery through Re-Trac’s new Podium program, which will be unveiled at next week's Resource Recycling Conference [Ed: the publisher of this publication is also the organizer of the conference].

WRAP is a new national outreach initiative to increase the recycling of PE bags, wraps and film. Organizers say that "it will provide a platform to motivate stakeholders to combine their resources and know-how to build a growing movement to increase plastic film recycling throughout the country." The program is an extension of a project initiated by the FFRG with the State of Wisconsin to facilitate broader recycling of plastic film beyond bags.

Local access to film drop-off programs is widespread throughout the U.S., with most collection centers located at around 18,000 grocery and retail stores. However, public awareness of film recycling and access remains very low. WRAP was formed to remove barriers and double America's film recycling to 2 billion pounds by 2020.

For more information on the Emerge Knowledge workshop at the Resource Recycling Conference, go to rrconference.com/workshops.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:33
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Sept. 11, 2014

A packaging giant in South Africa is moving forward on a PET recycling facility, and the U.K. gets some good news on its plastics recovery efforts.

South African paper and plastic packaging giant Mpact recently announced it is putting more than $30 million behind a PET processing operation in its home country. The facility will handle more than 29,000 tons of material annually.

Researchers at the University of New South Wales in Australia have created an algorithm that can help identify where marine debris generated in different nations ultimately ends up in the world's oceans. The mathematical model takes into account the intricacies of ocean currents and other factors.

U.K. consumers will be exposed to more messaging encouraging the recycling of plastic thanks to a just-launched initiative called Pledge 4 Plastics. The effort is supported by the U.K. government as well as packaging giants such as Coca-Cola and Unilever, and it aims to help the nation stay on line with government-established plastics recycling targets over the next several years.

That campaign comes in the wake of initial findings from a U.K. government study that found the nation is doing better than expected on working toward its plastics recycling goals. The U.K. has a plastic packaging recycling rate target of 57 percent by 2017.


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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 11:31
NewsBits

Sept. 11, 2014

A letter from the attorney general in Texas indicated municipal bag bans may not be allowed under Lone Star State law. Greg Abbott wrote out his legal thoughts on the matter at the request of a state lawmaker. Dallas, Austin and a number of other municipalities in Texas have passed bans and/or fees on plastic carryout bags.

Green Sky Industries of New Jersey last week informed its more than 100 employees it is abruptly closing both of its processing facilities in the state due to "declining business conditions." A holder of more than 75 municipal contracts, Green Sky was said to be hampered by Green Fence-related markets for recycled commodities overseas.

In other news out of the Garden State, the municipality of Parsippany-Troy Hills has stopped accepting plastic bags in its curbside recycling service.

Residents in the rural Regional District of Fraser-Fort George in British Columbia will be able to recycle all plastics No. 1 through 7 starting this October. The materials will need to be brought to area recycling depots.

 

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St. Paul eyes 2015 RFP before expanding program

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 13:01
St. Paul eyes 2015 RFP before expanding program

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Sept. 10, 2014

The City of St. Paul, Minnesota has postponed plans to upgrade its residential recycling program until it reviews bids for a new recycling contract next year.

The City, which has been serviced by Minneapolis-based Eureka Recycling since 2001, had planned to replace bins with carts in 2015, but the cost of the move, which would also require a switch from curbside to alleyway pickup, has led the mayor's office to hold off on those plans for now.

"We need to make sure we get the program that we want at a competitive price," Annie Hunt, environmental advisor to St. Paul's mayor, told Resource Recycling.

According to Hunt, the City has been approached by Eureka on several different occasions to negotiate a contract extension before the 2015 RFP. With Eureka's contract set to expire at the end of 2016, the company is hoping to receive some kind of extension guaranteeing the longtime partnership will continue.

"One of the things the city had said that it wanted to do — and it's a significant change to the program — was to move collections from curbside collection to alley collection," said Eureka's co-president, Tim Brownell. "For Eureka to be able to make that switch we would need to purchase a new fleet of trucks … and the challenge is to try to affordably be able to do that when we have less than two years remaining on our contract."

By securing a three-year extension through 2019, Eureka would be able to purchase a new fleet of trucks while the city would purchase the carts on its own, Brownell said.

Reports have varied widely on the kind of offers Eureka has submitted, however, and Hunt said the City has been advised by its legal advisor to see the RFP through before making any commitments.

Eureka's last offer, Hunt added, called for an annual 5 percent hike in residential recycling fees after initial offers suggested a far higher increase.

Brownell, meanwhile, contends that as long as the company is awarded a three-year contract extension through 2019, residents won't see their annual fee increase at all.

"We could do it for no service increase at all if we were to extend the terms of the contract," Brownell said.

Hunt said the residential recycling fee comes out to an average of $52 per single-family household annually, while Brownell offered a lower number: $43 annually.

Eureka went forward with switching to single-stream service this year, but it is still collecting material curbside in bins. The firm also has begun accepting more plastics, including containers with Nos. 4, 5 and 7 resin codes.

Once the city makes the switch to carts — a move both Hunt and Brownell noted would likely increase collection and recycling in the city — a food scrap collection program would likely be next on the agenda to improve St. Paul's diversion efforts.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2014: Just a week away

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 12:58
Resource Recycling Conference 2014: Just a week away

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Sept. 10, 2014

If you haven't signed up for the best meeting of the minds in recycling, the time to act is now. The Resource Recycling Conference kicks off next Monday, Sept. 15.

This year's conference is taking place in New Orleans and offers attendees a jambalaya of networking opportunities and educational events. The second annual Recycling Innovators Forum, the trade show hall, the sessions covering the biggest industry trends — it's all part of the conference experience.

Resource Recycling Conference 2014 is taking place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Sept. 15-17. Head to rrconference.com for more information on attending, sponsoring and exhibiting.


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Rhode Island takes on contaminated loads

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 12:54
Rhode Island takes on contaminated loads

By Dan Leif, Resource Recycling

Sept. 10, 2014

The group that operates the only MRF in Rhode Island says it has seen significant increases in contamination over the last year, and it's starting to more frequently fine municipalities that send heavily tainted loads.

Starting last week, the quasi-public state organization Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation (RIRRC) began regularly enforcing a code in its municipal contracts that makes contaminated loads subject to a $250 fee.

RIRRC's director of recycling services, Sarah Kite, said three loads totaling roughly 22 tons brought in on Sept. 6 from the city of Cranston were rejected and hit with fines. In the past, RIRRC would issue only two or three contamination fines for an entire year.

"We're seeing a lot of food scraps," said Kite, "and also leaf and yard debris, construction and demolition debris, broken furniture, cables, ropes, textiles and more. The contaminated loads are just garbage."

Kite said the rise in contamination has come alongside the transition to single-stream collection in many of the state's larger municipalities. Currently, 14 towns and cities in Rhode Island offer automated single-stream pick-up of recyclables.

Kite said all was moving ahead smoothly until Providence, the state's capital and largest city with 225,000 people, switched to roll carts in 2013.

"Providence has the most to gain and the most to contribute, but what we're seeing unfortunately is they are causing the most problems," Kite said. "Looking back, I think the program needed to be implemented in phases. You start with different areas of the city and that way you can really target your educational efforts. The door-to-door was needed in a city as diverse as Providence."

Kite said RIRRC sent out notices to municipalities in early July alerting them to the fact the enforcement action would start up this month. She said the timing was tough because Labor Day weekend tends to be a time of heavy waste generation and thus improper use of recycling bins. But she thinks when towns and cities see the load rejection charges on their September bills, they will be quick to deepen communication with residents.

"Public works directors are saying, 'I need a stick,'" said Kite. "Hopefully, this will help them prove their point they need more ongoing education."

The RIRRC's MRF processes 130,000 tons of material per year. When a load dumped onto the tipping floor is deemed overly contaminated, it gets moved to the group's landfill, which is located nearby. Still, that step causes headaches for officials trying to keep pace with the materials stream.

"We're the only MRF in the state," Kite said. "We need to be operating 50 tons an hour and can't shut down."

Contamination also appears to be a concern in nearby New York City. A recent story cited 2014 data showing recycling violations up 47 percent six months through the year.

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Recyclebank celebrates a decade

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 12:50
Recyclebank celebrates a decade

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Sept. 10, 2014

Recycling rewards company Recyclebank has hit its 10-year anniversary.

Founded in 2004 by Ron Gonen, now the CEO of the Closed Loop Fund, Recyclebank has worked with roughly 300 communities to collect upwards of 5.8 billion pounds of material for recycling.

"Recyclebank was developed to change the way we think about sustainability and recycling. We believe that personal actions can and do make a big difference, that people prefer the carrot over the stick when it comes sustainability," said Javier Flaim, Recyclebank's CEO, in a press release. "Our 10-year anniversary is not just a celebration for Recyclebank, but a celebration for those communities, brands and partners who have worked tirelessly to truly make an impact on local recycling rates and, ultimately, pave the way for a greener future."

The company, which started as a program to provide incentives for communities and individuals to increase collection of recyclables through advanced tracking and data technology, has expanded over the years. Just recently, the company launched its own online store, OneTwine.com, where residents can purchase sustainability-minded goods.

According to the latest data from Recyclebank, 2013 saw partnerships across the country lead to 1.5 billion pounds of material getting collected and recycled. That haul accounts for just over 25 percent of the company's all-time collection totals.

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2014 Recycling Innovators Forum: See the finalists make their pitches

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 12:48
2014 Recycling Innovators Forum: See the finalists make their pitches

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Sept. 10, 2014

The organizers of the 2014 Recycling Innovators Forum have identified the eight proposals that are moving on to the final presentation stage as they compete for a combined $40,000 in cash prizes and valuable industry exposure.

Complete information on each of the concepts and the individuals behind them can be found here. The competition is divided into two categories — Enterprise/Institution for entries that came from a larger company and group and Garage Innovator for proposals from small startups and teams — and four finalists were selected on each side. The second annual competition received more than 60 proposals.

The final presentation round will take place the afternoon of Monday, Sept. 15 at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside during the first day of the Resource Recycling Conference. The event is free and open to the public and will be followed by a reception where all Innovators Forum presenters will be on hand to answer questions and develop industry contacts.

To learn more and register for the Forum for free, click here.

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 12:40
NewsBits

Sept. 10, 2014

Green Sky Industries of New Jersey last week informed its more than 100 employees it is abruptly closing both of its processing facilities in the state due to "declining business conditions." A holder of more than 75 municipal contracts, Green Sky was said to be hampered by Green Fence-related markets for recycled commodities overseas.

Targeting "young people with empty cans and empty wallets" at music festivals in Sweden, McDonald's has begun accepting emptied containers in exchange for food. Armed with black recycling bags, consumers can now trade in 10 cans for either a hamburger or cheeseburger at select McDonalds restaurants in Sweden. Want a Big Mac? That'll cost you 40 cans.

Approximately 43 billion packages manufactured by Tetra Pak were recycled worldwide in 2013, the packaging and food service company has announced. Tetra Pak, which employs more than 23,000 people and supplies to more than 170 countries, recently released its 2014 Sustainability Updateand the document is available online.

Recycling fines are up 47 percent in New York City, the New York Post has reported. Those fines, which totaled 56,000 citywide during the first half of 2014, are likely connected to the city's April 2013 inclusion of rigid plastics in its recycling program – any rigid plastic found in trash bags is considered a punishable a violation of the city's recycling law.

Vermont's Universal Recycling Law may target increased recycling and composting in the state, but at least one municipality is considering doing away with its longtime curbside recycling program because of it. The town of Middlebury, Vermont, which has had curbside recycling since 1990, is weighing a handful of options that will either expand the service – meeting the requirements of the law – or let curbside be handled entirely by the private sector.

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