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Wide world of recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 07:22
Wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

March 17, 2015

A major city in China is starting to offer subsidies to recycling operations so they will move to collect more low-value recyclable material.

The government in the Chinese city of Guangzhou has begun paying subsidies to recycling enterprises so they will have an incentive to take in and process lower value materials. The effort is part of the a strategy to raise the recycling rate by 10 percent in the 13 million inhabitant city in the southern part of the country.

Political leaders in Wales have hinted at introducing policies to increase coordination and data systems within the nation's recycling collection efforts. Wales has already given itself a 70 percent recycling rate target for 2025.

Leaders in the Australian state of VIctoria, which includes the city of Melbourne, have indicated they are moving toward instituting a landfill ban on used electronics. The nation already has legislation in place that requires electronics manufacturers to help fund a country-wide e-scrap recycling system, though the details of that program are currently under review.

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 07:20
NewsBits

March 17, 2015

State and federal investigators have found “substantial wage and hour violations” at beverage container recycling facilities in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley area, according to a press release. CalRecycle and the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division have inked an agreement to work together to crack down on illegal labor practices within the industry.

A bill in the Pennsylvania General Assembly would again allow municipalities to charge “reasonable and necessary fees” to fund their recycling programs. House Bill 755 would reverse a court decision that stated municipalities can't charge the fees because state law doesn't expressly say they can.

In a letter published in the Indianapolis Star over the weekend, the leader of the Indiana Recycling Coalition (IRC) offered some updates on the battle over a plan to build a mixed-waste MRF for the city's refuse. Carey Hamilton of the IRC writes that during a recent court hearing on the issue, a city representative noted the plan is centered on the disposal of solid waste. Hamilton says this a reversal from the city's earlier comments that framed the Covanta facility as a method to boost recycling. She also says the MRF is not yet a done deal.

In lighter news out of Indy, a woman who has been dubbed “The Can Lady” is raising money for city schools and teaching children about recycling at the same time. RTV6 News featured Mary Stumpp in a recent report.

No radical changes are necessary to improving plastics recycling; instead, what the sector needs is greater participation rates in existing programs. That's the view of Harry Floyd, program coordinator of Virginia's Clean Fairfax Council. In a blog post on The Hill political news site, he called for sensible action to improve the amount of plastics that get recycled.

The U.S. has had an on-again, off-again love affair with recycling, which has been shaped by technology, markets and public relations. So writes John Timmer, science editor at Ars Technica.

The operator of a San Jose, California-area landfill, recycling and composting center is forming a coalition to address odor-issues in the area, a representative said. Republic Services of Santa Clara County also says its landfill, which it is looking to enlarge, is not to blame for many of the area’s odor issues.

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Industry and supplier news

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 07:11
Industry and supplier news

March 17, 2015

Howell, Michigan-based battery recycling company Battery Solutions has hired Alexander Nitsche as its chief financial officer. He previously served as CFO at Schuler Inc., a metal-forming equipment company. For more, click here.

QRS Recycling of New Albany, Indiana will move a single-stream recycling processing operation across the Ohio River to Louisville, Kentucky. The company will retain a metals recycling operation in New Albany. For more, click here.

MaryEllen Etienne, executive director of the Reuse Alliance, is leaving her post with the organization to fill the CEO role at the Reuse Institute.


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Kuusakoski to replace ADC option with storage cell

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 21:37
UPDATED: Kuusakoski to replace ADC option with storage cell

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

March 12, 2015

A year after beginning an operation to use treated CRT glass as alternative daily cover at a landfill in Illinois, Kuusakoski US says it is phasing out that approach in favor of a different strategy: storing CRT glass in a mineable cell.

Kuusakoski's decision comes after its alternative daily cover (ADC) operation in Peoria, Illinois was largely resisted by state electronics recycling programs as well as officials in charge of the e-Stewards and R2 e-scrap environmental certifications.

"We went after the ADC approach because we saw it as beneficial use," Kuusakoski US CEO Rich Hipp told E-Scrap News. "But the recycling community didn't see it as such."

Kuusakoski US is a division of Finland-based Kuusakoski Recycling.

The company's ADC operation concluded 2014 receiving glass from just one state electronics recycling program: Illinois. The regulators in charge of a number of other state programs made determinations that the ADC option did not constitute recycling, and, therefore, collected pounds headed to ADC could not be counted toward manufacturer collection quotas.

In 2014, Kussakoski's ADC operation reached just 25 percent of its 50,000 ton annual capacity.

The company is hopeful the industry will support the storage cell notion. Instead of spreading treated CRT glass as ADC, Kuusakoski is planning on storing treated glass in a "mineable" cell, also on the premises of a landfill, for future recovery. The company says the operation has a 100,000 ton annual capacity.

Hipp made it clear the company is committed to its second attempt at entering the U.S. CRT glass processing sector.

As long as the company receives approval at the state level and/or approval from e-Stewards, Hipp said "our plan is to move immediately to the retrievable storage cell."

A number of questions surround the storage idea. The strategy is predicated on the notion that at some point in the future a market will emerge for leaded CRT glass. At that point, Kuusakoski would be able to move the glass at no cost, or even get paid for the material, Hipp suggested.

It remains unclear how or when such a glass market could present itself.

The company has filed a formal petition to the BAN board of directors, hoping that a policy will be developed that would deem storage recycling and allow e-Stewards certified firms to move the glass to Kuusakoski. Hipp indicated his company would likely make similar overtures to Sustainable Electronics Recycling International, which administers the R2 standard.

For much more on the Kuusakoski development, look to the story "Downstream Decisions," in the March 2015 print edition of E-Scrap News magazine.

[Editor's Note: In the interest of being more exact, we have removed the word "lobbying" from the second-to-last paragraph of this story and replaced it with "filed a formal petition."  Please read the below comment for a complete description of the e-Stewards petition process.]

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Recycling industry can expect more shipping troubles

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 21:33
Recycling industry can expect more shipping troubles

By Jerry Powell, E-Scrap News

March 12, 2015

Due to several factors, the cost of moving recyclable material by truck is expected to rise – and securing a trucker may become harder.

Demand for long-haul trucking is being aided by the low cost of diesel fuel. In times of more typical fuel prices, intermodal shipping (employing both trains and trucks) is cheaper after about 500 miles when containers are moved to or from a pier. Now, with sharply lower fuel costs, truckers can move freight cost efficiently up to 750 miles from the pier.

This comes at a time when the country has more freight to move. Intermodal freight volumes rose 5 percent last year while truck tonnages increased 3 percent. Some analysts expect truck tonnage in 2015 to rise faster than intermodal trade.

Even though demand for trucking is rising, the trucking sector does not have enough drivers to move this freight. The American Trucking Associations says 35,000 more drivers are needed to meet demand.

This labor shortage has several causes. Current truckers tend to be older than workers in many other industries (the average trucker age is 55) and retirement levels are high. In addition, when the economy improves, eligible workers choose jobs that keep them at home and look askance at employment, such as trucking, that takes them away from their families.


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Discussions underway to update New Jersey’s e-scrap law

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 21:30
Discussions underway to update New Jersey’s e-scrap law

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

March 12, 2015

A New Jersey lawmaker may introduce legislation boosting the government’s role in e-scrap recycling, a move electronics manufacturers would likely fight.

State Sen. Bob Smith, who helped write the Garden State's original e-scrap recycling law, is working on legislation that would update the law, said Marie Kruzan, executive director of the Association of New Jersey Recyclers.

A bill hasn’t been introduced yet, but the legislation would aim to bring New Jersey’s e-scrap program, called E-Cycle New Jersey, more in line with the state law in Connecticut, Kruzan said.

Connecticut's e-scrap program is relatively unique because it has government officials set the prices that recycling contractors get paid by the product manufacturers funding the state program. In most other states with e-scrap legislation, pricing is left for the market to determine.

In addition, the Connecticut model does not rely on a fixed collection target manufacturers are responsible for hitting. Such targets have caused issues in New Jersey and other states because manufacturers have at times stopped processing material after hitting their annual goals, leaving a backlog of collected material awaiting processing.

David Thompson, director of the corporate environmental program at Newark, New Jersey-based Panasonic North America, said that, based on what he heard at a Feb. 9 New Jersey Senate committee hearing, Smith is proposing legislation that would make New Jersey's program essentially on par with Connecticut's.

Smith couldn’t be reached for comment.

Currently in New Jersey, the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) provides a target number of pounds the manufacturers are responsible for recycling each year, and the manufacturers get to contract with their choice of recycling firms to hit that quota. The New Jersey law took effect in 2010.

Kruzan, who supports the proposed changes to New Jersey's program, said the current e-scrap landscape in the state needs fixing.

“What’s been happening is halfway through the year the manufacturer says, ‘We’ve collected everything. We don’t have to do it anymore,’” she said. “Basically the state doesn’t have any way to check that they’re giving them right numbers.”

According to Kruzan, recycling companies receiving contracts from manufacturers are getting paid much less than what is needed to fully process material, and those not receiving contracts are forced to battle with local governments over who pays for e-scrap collection.

Thompson, who also serves as president of product manufacturer recycling group MRM, said manufacturers support policies to better match supply and demand and ensure proper processing of all collected material. In some cases, states underestimate the amount that will be generated when they establish targets, he said.

“We’re trying to match our target to what a group of collection sites will generate,” he said.

DEP increased the targets again for 2015, Thompson indicated.

“I said this at the hearing – I thought that the New Jersey situation could be resolved with the target increase that the DEP implemented,” he said.

Manufacturers typically oppose Connecticut-style legislation because, in those states, the recycling costs to manufacturers are substantially higher for the same amount of material per capita, Thompson said. And they want to be able to contract with recycling firms possessing high-quality, efficient recycling technology, he added.

“We want the ability to choose our own recyclers and to do our own collection,” Thompson said.

A bill would have New Jersey joining a short list of other states that are mulling changes to their e-scrap extended producer responsibility law this year. Illinois and New York are also considering amendments.


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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 21:25
Certification scorecard

March 12, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Computer Recycling LLCof North Kansas City, Missouri is now certified to e-stewards, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013.

Affordable Shred of Springfield, Illinois; Associated Records, Inc. | Shred Boss of Roswell, New Mexico; Best Shredding (Div/Best Service Pros) of Calgary, Alberta; Columbus Secure Document Solutions of Salt Lake City; De Graaf Security BV of Purerend, Netherlands; Goodwill Industries of Northwest Texas of Lubbock, Texas; Ohio Mobile Shredding of Columbus, Ohio; Paper Pig Shredding of Wichita Falls, Texas; Paper Recycling & Shredding Specialists, Inc. of Pomona, California; Richards & Richards of Nashville, Tennessee; Royal Document Destruction, Inc. of Gahanna, Ohio; Security Shredding Mobile Document Destruction of Lufkin, Texas; SelectShred, Inc. of Stuart, Florida; Shred Guard of Saint John, New Brunswick; South Bay Document Destruction of Gardena, California; Shred Monster, Inc. of Columbus, Nebraska; and Xpresshred LLC of Englewood, Colorado have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.


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Wide world of recycling

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 21:24
Wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

March 12, 2015

The U.K. government has supplied nearly $1 million to help a group of firms test out processing e-scrap via plasma.

A group in the U.K. has received nearly $1 million in grant funds from the government to put toward a plasma furnace aimed at precious metals recovery from e-scrap. Tetronics International, with the help of Metech Recycling and Vale Europe, will use the funds from Innovate U.K. to fund and build the region's "first integrated plasma facility for the sustainable processing of electronic waste to pure precious metal," the company announced in a press release.

Nigeria's University of Lagos recently hosted an e-scrap-themed art exhibition. Inviting Nigerian and international artists to contribute works about, and sometimes including, end-of-life electronics, the university also hosted a symposium on the global issues of e-scrap and the much-debated topics of illegal exports and dumping of hazardous materials in Africa.

It appears the exact volume of e-scrap collected for recycling in the U.K. is up for debate. It was recently announced that manufacturer-funded e-scrap programs exceeded collection targets in 2014, but statistics from the actual processors have since surfaced and suggest those programs might actually have fallen just short of the 540,000-ton goal. The government has launched an investigation to resolve the disparity in reported tonnages.


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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 21:19
NewsBits

March 12, 2015

During the month of February, Washington's electronics recycling program collected 3.26 million pounds of electronics, according to its latest monthly report. That brings the total tally for 2015 to 6.57 million pounds, very close to last year's January-February mark of 6.47 million pounds. In 2014, the state reported that collection volumes had dropped compared to 2013, a potential sign that Washington has begun to make headway in cleaning out remaining CRT device tonnages.

Illinois-based processor Com2 Recycling expects to launch its CRT glass-to-tile operation by the first or second week of April, the company's chief financial officer, Saheem Baloch, told E-Scrap News. Announced last October with an annual capacity of roughly 15,000 tons, Com2's approach is mirrored by at least one other firm, Spain's Camacho Recycling.

New York's Westchester County has continued to see e-scrap collection volumes soar. In 2014, the county collected more than 4 million pounds of e-scrap, a 17.6 percent increase from 2013 activity. Lou Vetrone, the deputy commissioner of the county's Department of Environmental Facilities, says Westchester will continue "to see steady numbers for at least the next seven or eight years."

Sage Electronics has announced the opening of its second "repurposing center." Joining Sage's Columbus, Ohio headquarters, the Reno, Nevada location will provide repair and reuse services to West Coast businesses. A third facility, in Baltimore, is expected to open soon as well.

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Cooperation key to NYC plastics recycling expansion

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:20
Cooperation key to NYC plastics recycling expansion

By Dan Leif, Plastics Recycling Update

March 11, 2015

In April 2013, New York City began directing residents to toss all rigid plastics in their recycling bins. Two years later, that initiative appears to be working out, thanks in part to the efforts of New York's downstream processing partners.

At last month's Plastics Recycling 2015 conference in Dallas, representatives from three entities key to the New York plastics play took to the stage to describe how America's largest city has been able to steer significantly higher quantities of discarded plastics (especially Nos. 3-7) out of the landfill stream.

Bridget Anderson, deputy commissioner for recycling and sustainability at the New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY), offered the municipal angle. She said the decision to bring more plastics into the system was not purely an economic move. The City pays a $70 per ton tip fee for metal, glass and plastic recyclables, and it sees only a limited amount of revenue sharing once those materials are marketed.

Anderson also pointed out that a recent waste characterization study found plastics represent 14 percent of discards by city residents. As officials looked to respond to pushes from former Mayor Michael Bloomberg and bolster a long-stagnated recycling rate, inviting more plastic types into recycling bins seemed like a potential pathway.

The move has meant increased volumes of items such as yogurt containers, clamshells and shampoo bottles heading into New York's recycling stream. Once collected, that material becomes the responsibility of Sims Municipal Recycling, which had been handling much of New York's recycling at a facility in New Jersey. In late 2013, the company opened another facility, the much-heralded $100 million MRF in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn.

On stage in Dallas, Sims' Maite Quinn said her company, which currently has a 20-year processing contract with DSNY, had some initial reservations about the influx of a broad range of plastics. "We had questions about how it would affect our equipment," she said, "but we took the dive."

The move by New York happened to occur at the same time China's Operation Green Fence customs crackdown struck the U.S. recycling industry, and in some ways that was actually helpful for New York program stakeholders. Quinn, who is Sims Municipal Recycling's manager of business development and marketing, said Sims had made alterations to their optical sorters after the Fence went up, and the changes helped the company capture and separate the tubs and lids that were more frequently coming in when New York changed its plastics policy.

She added Sims has seen monthly volumes in the metal, glass and plastic category increase by 10 percent since New York went to its expanded approach. "Seventy-five percent of that material has a market," she said.

That market perspective was voiced at the Dallas session by Stephanie Baker, director of recycling market development at Troy, Alabama-based KW Plastics. The company's recycling division specializes in working with PP and HDPE, and it buys significant tonnages of New York material from Sims. Baker noted KW buys 50 million pounds of tubs and lids material annually from 10 different MRF companies around the country.

She noted that communication between stakeholders has been critical in successfully moving New York materials downstream. In recent years, KW published bale specs for both bulky rigids and tubs and lids, and Baker praised Sims' work to keep such contamination requirements in mind.

"We sometimes talk about cutting out the middleman in recycling," Baker said. "In this case, the project wouldn't have happened without the middleman."

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Sorema leads purchase of Perpetual Recycling Solutions

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:17
Sorema leads purchase of Perpetual Recycling Solutions

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

March 11, 2015

First, Sorema helped equip Perpetual Recycling Solutions’ 100,000-square-foot PET recycling facility. Now, it is part of a group purchasing the processing company.

Sorema Plastics Recycling Systems, an Italian firm, leads a partnership that recently acquired Indiana-based Perpetual, according to a press release.

Perpetual Recycling Solutions’ recycling facility opened in Richmond, Indiana in January 2013, using processing equipment from Sorema. The facility can process up to 80,000 tons of PET per year to produce flake for manufacturing into new products, including food-grade plastic products.

“The Perpetual team has already made a significant contribution to the rPET industry, producing the highest quality clear flake in the market,” Aldo Previero, a director and owner of Sorema, stated in a press release. “We are confident that we can help Perpetual make another leap forward. We have been working together with the company and its financial partners since the fall and have already seen important improvements in plant efficiency and product consistency.”

Perpetual's founder and CEO, David Bender, will remain with the company to focus on special projects.

Sorema is a division of the Italy-based Previero.

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Canada Fibers sharpens plastic focus

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:15
Canada Fibers sharpens plastic focus

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

March 11, 2015

One of Canada's largest MRF operators is focusing more specifically on the plastics recycling space with a Toronto-based operation targeting PET, HDPE and PP.

The move furthers a trend toward the development of plastics recovery facilities (or PRFs) in North America as export markets remain fickle and plastic products make up a larger percentage of the post-consumer stream.

Canada Fibers representatives say the recently formed Urban Polymers business will be able to process 25 million pounds of PET and 11 million pounds of HDPE and PP a year.

"It's a logical next step for Canada Fibers," Urban Polymers CEO Mark Badger told Plastics Recycling Update. "Canada Fibers is in the recovery business and this takes us one step further into the recovery business."

According to the Canada Fibers website, the company currently has six plant locations, most of them in the Toronto area.

Badger said PET flake from the Urban Polymers operation will mostly go toward North American bottle manufacturing, while HDPE and PP pellets will be used "primarily in non-food grade applications," including detergent packaging.

Badger said "there's a market in place" for all three resins, but additional markets could open up for recycled HDPE and PP if "they get the consistency and purity and the degree of custom-compounding they would like."

Badger said the company will use technology and equipment from European manufacturers. Badger expects the facility to open in the spring and employ at the onset about 25 employees.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE injection crate prices rise

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:12
PetroChem Wire: Recycled HDPE injection-crate prices rise

March 11, 2015

HDPE injection-crate pellet and flake prices rose in early March as end users booked deliveries following a mostly dormant February.

Regrind prices increased 5-6 cents per pound with business done at 46 cents per pound delivered Ontario and U.S. East Coast (around 44 cents per pound FOB). Pellet business was done at 50-51 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast, up 2.5 cents per pound from the end of February.

HDPE bale pricing also rebounded. Natural bales from curbside rose around 2 cents per pound the first week of March to 26-27 cents per pound as supply tightened due to weather-related delays in curbside pick-up and bale preparation by municipalities and MRFs. Mixed colored bale prices were also higher.

In the prime injection grade polyethylene market, prices slipped from 64 cents per pound at the end of February to 63.5 cents per pound on March 6.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

 

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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:09
NewsBits

March 11, 2015

A $1 million, 175,000-pound, custom-built kiln has been delivered from Germany to Vadxx Energy's plant in Akron, Ohio. Once completed, the company says, the operation will will be capable of converting 60 tons of plastic to diesel fuel each day.

The European Commission plans to reintroduce its “circular economy” proposals on increasing recycling and targeting zero waste systems. The EU’s environment, maritime affairs and fisheries commissioner said binding measures would be introduced. In response, the head of PlasticsEurope said the industry supports the circular economy notion but called for proposals to be flexible in how goals are achieved.

Theft of recyclable materials in San Francisco is an issue, but when it comes to low-income people pulling materials from bins, hauler and MRF operator Recology isn’t concerned. However, the company does want to find a way to stop fly-by-night operators who buy materials from these pickers, often taking advantage of them, and sell to recycling centers.

The leader of the U.K. Liberal Democrats party pledged to ensure that biodegradable and paper bags are also charged a fee, along with other single-use plastic bags under bag policy in the country. Nick Clegg, deputy prime minister, said the Liberal Democrats, if they remain in power following May elections, would seek to have the 5 pence (currently about 8 cents) fee placed on all single-use bags. The current law, set to go into effect in October, exempts biodegradable and paper bags.

 

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Industry and supplier news

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 21:07
Industry and supplier news

March 11, 2015

Italy-based company AMUT Group has purchased a company that specializes in cast and blown lines for flexible films. AMUT Group, a manufacturer of plastics recycling and extrusion equipment, purchased Dolci Bielloni. For more, click here.

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers recognized three companies for new products that it says meet or exceed its standards for recyclability. The companies were DAK America of Charlotte, North Carolina; Plastipak Packaging of Plymouth, Michigan; and Sleever International of France. For more, click here.

Arkansas-based Delta Plastics announced it has reached a milestone: 1 billion pounds of plastics recycled since it began operations in 1998. The company, which says it’s the largest processor of plastics in the state, specializes in recycling and producing agricultural plastics. For more, click here.

Think Beyond Plastic Innovation Form has organized an event at the U.S. Capitol featuring recycling, material, manufacturing and design innovations that reduce the impacts of plastics on the world’s oceans. The March 16 meeting will feature exhibitors and a panel discussion on the role government has in the space. For more, click here.

 

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Ad campaign encourages recycling of bathroom products

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 22:47
Ad campaign encourages recycling of bathroom products

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

March 10, 2015

More than half of respondents to a recent survey said they aren’t sure which bathroom items can be recycled. In addition, the survey found only about 10 percent of American households put recycling receptacles in the bathroom.

Keep America Beautiful (KAB) and the Ad Council want to change that.

The two nonprofit organizations have teamed up with Unilever to launch a public information effort aimed at educating adults about which bathroom items can be recycled. Using public service announcements and digital outreach, they’ll target the nearly half of adult Americans who aren’t recycling items including shampoo bottles, toilet paper rolls or toothpaste boxes.

A new survey shows that 45 percent of Americans have recycling cans in their kitchens, compared to 10 percent who have them in their bathrooms, according to a press release. More than half of respondents also said they have a lack of knowledge about which items can be recycled in the bathroom, and nearly half said they don’t think about recycling in the bathroom.

“As a society, we’ve come a long way in increasing recycling in the kitchen, but now it’s critical that we carry that progress into the bathroom,” KAB President and CEO Jennifer Jehn stated in a press release.

The effort is a new phase in the “I Want To Be Recycled” communications campaign, originally launched in 2013. The campaign website, which includes information on recycling and an online MRF game, can be found here. The efforts target adults who are sporadic recyclers with access to curbside pickup, according to a project fact sheet.

The online survey, conducted by ORC International, was conducted Feb. 12-15, 2015, among a demographically representative U.S. sample of 1,032 adults, according to a press release.

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Ohio eyes more recycling data

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 22:43
Ohio eyes more recycling data

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

March 10, 2015

Ohio is making a push to gather more recycling data from commercial and industrial sectors.

In partnership with the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, Ohio Council of Retail Merchants and the Ohio Manufacturers’ Association, Ohio EPA has launched a statewide initiative targeting businesses to provide more detailed recycling data to their local solid waste districts. In years past, getting data from commercial and industrial sectors in particular has been "challenging" for Ohio's 52 solid waste districts, the agency says.

By partnering with business groups in the state, Ohio EPA is hopeful it will receive more data from commercial and industrial sources.

"On the local level, we really want to develop the relationship between the solid waste management districts and the businesses within those districts," Ohio EPA spokesperson Dina Pierce told Resource Recycling. "There are things that the local districts can offer, especially services, and this hopefully gets them to get to know each other a little better."

According to Pierce, the state met its residential and commercial recycling rate goal of 25 percent in 2013 but fell short of the industrial recycling rate goal of 66 percent.

More detailed data for 2014 will give the state "a truer understanding of how we're doing," while also providing more data on the most commonly recycled materials in Ohio, Pierce said.

To help districts reach businesses and industries this time around, Ohio EPA has launched a page on its website to streamline the data reporting process. According to a press release, the survey takes 15 minutes to complete.

The survey is another example of states attempting to arrive at more complete recycling data. Georgia is in the midst of a similar campaign, while Texas, a state known for how little is known about its recycling activity, has established its first-ever recycling rate.

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Recycling industry can expect more shipping troubles

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 22:39
Recycling industry can expect more shipping troubles

By Jerry Powell, Resource Recycling

March 10, 2015

Due to several factors, the cost of moving recyclable material by truck is expected to rise – and securing a trucker may become harder.

Demand for long-haul trucking is being aided by the low cost of diesel fuel. In times of more typical fuel prices, if you wanted to move a container to or from a pier, intermodal shipping (employing both trains and trucks) is cheaper after about 500 miles. Now, with sharply lower fuel costs, truckers can move freight cost efficiently up to 750 miles from the pier. This comes at a time when we have more freight to move. For instance, intermodal freight volumes rose five percent last year while truck tonnage increased three percent. Some analysts expect truck tonnage in 2015 to rise faster than intermodal trade.

Even though demand for trucking is rising, we do not have enough drivers to move this freight. The American Trucking Associations says we need 35,000 more drivers to meet demand. This labor shortage has several causes. Current truckers are old (age of 55 on average) and retirement levels are high. Too, when the economy improves, eligible workers choose jobs that keep them at home and look askance at employment, such as trucking, that takes them away from their families.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Updates from major initiatives

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 22:31
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Updates from major initiatives

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

March 10, 2016

In the last year, the industry has seen two major corporate-backed efforts form to help municipalities push their recycling programs forward. At the 2015 Resource Recycling Conference, attendees will get an up-close look at how those public-private partnerships are progressing.

Ron Gonen of the Closed Loop Fund and Keefe Harrison from the Recycling Partnership will both take to the stage in Indianapolis to explain the initial steps their respective projects have made. These sessions will help articulate the ways corporate dollars are affecting America's national diversion landscape and will give recycling professionals an inside look at how key funding decisions are being made.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


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WRAP releases contamination guide

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 22:26
WRAP releases contamination guide

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

March 10, 2015

Waste prevention advocacy group WRAP has released a how-to guide on reducing contamination for U.K. municipalities.

WRAP's advice centers on two basic goals for recycling program managers: Figure out the degree to which contamination is plaguing loads, and take action to stem the tide of material that can't be processed at MRFs.

According to the group's new guide, if contamination is an issue, recycling managers first should direct "clear, positive" information to residents. That includes providing an easy-to-read list of what can and can't go into the bin depending on the capabilities of partner MRFs. It also requires program leaders to tailor their messages to their target audience.

If contamination continues, WRAP's guide suggests individual household communication, in the form of stickers or notices, to help reinforce the importance of only putting in the bin what can be recycled. The group also says meeting with households individually and leaving contaminant-heavy bins uncollected can help improve the quality of material headed for MRFs.

And, as a "final course of action," WRAP says eliminating the bin remains an option if residents are particularly contamination-prone.

"You may choose to remove or replace the usual recycling containers provided to the householder," the guide reads.

According to the group, MRFs throughout the U.K. reported contamination rates as high as 27 percent during 2012 and 2013. The average contamination rate held at about 6.4 percent, but the group says "anecdotal evidence suggests the true figure for contamination could be much higher."

A recent WRAP survey found half of respondents claimed to recycle items that either can't be recycled or are hard-to-recycle.

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