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A county-run MRF success story

Resource Recycling Magazine - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:59
A county-run MRF success story

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 3, 2014

Maryland's Baltimore County is operating its own recycling facility and making money off of it.

According to county officials, the Cockeysville plant has made a profit of $750,000 in four months and could make up to $2 million in net revenue this year.

"Not only are we retaining the market value of the recyclables ourselves, but this facility maximizes the benefits of our easy, single-stream residential recycling collection program for residents," Kevin Kamenetz, county executive, said in a press release.

The $23 million facility opened last November, serving as a major component of the county's mission to divert 50 percent of its municipal solid waste stream. It's worth noting the county does not include the city of Baltimore itself, but it does include Towson and other communities in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

Since single-stream recycling went into effect in February of 2010, county residents have increased their volume of waste diversion by 49 percent. Last year was a record year for the area, diverting 53,714 tons of material.

County officials are beginning to give free public tours of the facility in hopes of encouraging more recycling among residents — and possibly netting some community volunteers to help with the operation.

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Domestic paper collection in China leads to sagging imports

Resource Recycling Magazine - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:59
Domestic paper collection in China leads to sagging imports

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 3, 2014

According to RISI, the paper industry analysis firm, China imported 7.3 percent less recovered paper in the first two months of this year compared with the year-earlier period. February imports dropped 11.3 percent from 2013.

In addition, according to a study from RISI released this week, Chinese paper imports dropped by about 1 million metric tons in 2013. Imports are expected to decline gradually through 2018 due to slowing economic growth, sluggish paper and board demand, new government regulations and limited supply in the exporting regions.

"Over time, fast-growing recovered paper demand and rising recovered paper prices have stimulated China's domestic recovered paper collection efforts. Now, as we see this trend continuing to grow, more paper and board is staying within the country for domestic collection," said Hannah Zhao, study author and senior economist of recovered paper at RISI.

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Austin contest looks to assist recycling startups

Resource Recycling Magazine - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:58
Austin contest looks to assist recycling startups

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 3, 2014

Industry entrepreneurs of all sizes are being encouraged to compete in a unique competition in Austin, Texas.

The Recycling Innovations Investment Forum will take place May 29 as part of a partnership between the city and the Texas Entrepreneur Network. At least 10 companies will be chosen to present at the forum, with a possible "lightning round" ushering 10 more companies into the mix.

The goal of the event is to bring recycling professionals and investors together to highlight "the tremendous growth opportunity in recycling manufacturing in Austin," a city press release explains.

"Early stage and growth stage companies with proven technology and scalable business models" are being especially targeted for this year's event. "Startups must demonstrate market acceptance" in order to get into the running, the release states.

The Recycling Innovations Investment Forum is part of the Austin Recycling Economic Development Program, which was formed to develop market opportunities for recyclers as the city aims to divert 90 percent of its waste by 2040.

For application materials, contact director@txenetworks.com with “ARIIF” in the subject line.

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Wide world of recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:57
Wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 3, 2014

Our global section looks at why aggressive recycling plans in the Philippines have failed to take hold and how a Toyota initiative in Japan is leading to more recycled copper.

Since 2010, the Philippine government has passed significant legislation to greatly increase composting and recycling around Manila — and reduce some of the harmful effects of poorly regulated landfills there. But according to some observers, the laws are not leading to action on the ground.

PBS' "NewsHour" recently took an in-depth look at how Kenya, with help from computer maker Dell, is looking to transform itself from e-scrap dumping ground to processing hub. The report makes it clear other African nations such as Uganda are keeping a close watch on the process to see if they can replicate successes within their own borders.

Toyota engineers in Japan have been working with parts manufacturers and dismantling firms to develop an efficient system for capturing copper components from old cars and recycling the material for use in new vehicles. The company says it expects to produce 1,000 tons of recycled copper by 2016.

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NewsBits from Resource Recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:55
NewsBits

April 3, 2014

April 7 will mark the beginning of a new recycling era in St. Paul, Minnesota as the city and its nonprofit recycling partner Eureka turn to single-stream recycling. The change means residents won't have to worry about sorting recyclables, and plastic packaging Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5 and 7 will now be accepted.

Global Green USA and seafood provider NAFCO announced a notable achievement for recycalable seafood packaging: A shipment made its way from the Chesapeake Bay to Boston in 100 percent recyclable, water-resistant cardboard packaging. The 500-mile journey went as planned, with the seafood arriving on the last day of the Boston Seafood Expo last month.

More than $2 million is going toward loans and grants to fund recycling projects throughout South Dakota in 2014. Awarded as part of nearly $41 million in environmental funding, recycling-specific projects will include a $10,000 grant for a city park recycling system in Sioux Falls.

A revamped collection system for waste and recycling being proposed in Los Angeles would bring more recycling and composting access to City of Angels residents. The LA City Council is expected to approve the move to an "exclusive franchise" collection system that would require bid-winning haulers to provide separate bins for recycling and offer organics collection at large multifamily buildings.

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New Jersey e-scrap program hits major stumbling blocks

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 13:01
New Jersey e-scrap program hits major stumbling blocks

By Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

March 28, 2014

Want evidence of how difficult it is to craft effective statewide laws for the rapidly evolving e-scrap landscape? Just look to New Jersey and the collection quagmire that's unfolded there.

According to a state official and various e-scrap stakeholders in the Garden State, materials recovered under the state's e-cycling law have piled up at some collection sites in recent months, in large part because industry consolidation and the ongoing CRT dilemma have sparked major funding deficits when it comes to moving material downstream.

Some counties in the southern part of the state have even threatened to discontinue running the collection sites that are integral to the e-cycling law's goal of offering free and convenient e-scrap collection access to all residents.

"Towns and counties are facing large costs that should not be there, and [they] are facing the prospect of pulling out of the collection system," said Marie Kruzan, executive director of the Association of New Jersey Recyclers.

Quotas met, material remains

The state's e-scrap law, which was implemented in 2011 and offers free collection of computers and televisions to residents and small businesses, lays program funding responsibility at the feet of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). Each year, the state's Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) sets out specific collection quotas individual OEMs must meet, but due to a variety of factors, major tonnages are remaining at municipal collection sites even after manufacturers say they've fulfilled their requirements.

The program's issues are in many ways exemplified by the straits that have confronted Magnum Computer Recycling, a de-manufacturing firm based in Pennsauken New Jersey. During the initial years of the e-cycling program, Magnum covered six counties in the southern part of the state, handling and transporting scrap collected in that region.

Magnum's owner, John Martorano, Jr., told E-Scrap News that during 2011 and 2012 the company had deals in place with MRM, an alliance of OEMs, and other corporate groups that worked to wrangle pounds on behalf of product manufacturers, and Magnum was paid 6 cents per pound for TVs and other covered material it collected and 15 cents per pound for the material it actually de-manufactured. Those sums were enough for Martorano to profitably and efficiently maintain his link in the program.

In the middle of last year, however, the OEM alliances Magnum was relying on said they could no longer pay him for pounds. According to Martorano, one of those contractors assured him more weight would be needed soon, and Martorano kept servicing his county clients, paying from his own pocket. When the contractor finally came back to him in January of this year, it offered Martorano just a penny per pound. With 600,000 pounds of TVs, monitors and other material amassed, he was forced to take the payment, even though it didn't come close to covering expenses.

Martorano, whose firm is certified to the R2 standard, says a number of other processing firms in New Jersey have run into similar dilemmas. "Recyclers are going out of business," he said. "It's like we're eating soup with a fork. We're tasting everything, but not getting full."

Guy Watson, chief of the Bureau of Recycling and Planning at New Jersey DEP, confirmed many of the specifics of the Magnum case.

"Magnum got in a bind," Watson said. "My understanding is that the company has been able to again start moving the material from the collection sites, but it's had to charge counties around 4.5 to 6 cents a pound." It's those charges that have begun forcing countries to consider nixing their collection efforts.

A beguiling market

So what's behind the economic shift that led to the funding upheaval? Watson points first to the increasingly beguiling CRT glass market. Over the last year, the well-documented shortage of options for final processing of leaded glass in North America began to have serious ripple effects on the profitability of New Jersey collection firms.

"The subsidy needed by recyclers from the manufacturers for the CRTs went up," said Watson, "because the cost went up to market it."

But the trend in OEM financing has been moving in the opposite direction. Kruzan of ANJR says with OEMs needing to collect weight in the more than 20 e-scrap law states, they are turning to national e-scrap firms that then subcontract out work on a state-by-state basis. Brokers have entered the picture, and competition has grown fierce, meaning OEMs are able to get their weight covered at a very low per-ton price.

Furthermore, Kruzan said the increased number of brokers and national firms working in the state makes it hard to keep track of whether manufacturers are actually collecting their proper weight allotments.

"We can't demand numbers from someone in Philadelphia or Timbuktu," she said. "There's no way to audit that. That is the fallacy of the law."

OEMs, however, say the problems in the legislation run deeper than just accounting specifics. Doug Smith, corporate director of environment, safety and health at Sony, said that in New Jersey and many other states, e-scrap mandates are passed without comprehensive economic analysis. As a result, shifts in the e-scrap marketplace inevitably lead to underfunded operations even when the OEMs pay for their required tons for TVs and other devices.

"I have to use contractors that use subcontractors," he said. "It's a reality when dealing with so many state laws. But these are compliance laws and we take them very seriously. The counties are faced with hiccups and that has a trickle effect that goes up to us. We take the blame, but all we're really doing is complying."

Program updates

Watson said DEP has made adjustments to the New Jersey system for the 2014 calendar year, increasing the state's per capita recovery target by 13 percent and boosting the forecast of CRT material that is expected to head into the system. He also said the department is now requiring OEMs to provide estimates of what they expect to garner from individual collection sites so that regulators can make sure firms working in different areas have the financial coverage they need.

But the recycling official also admitted creating a foolproof system that will satisfy all requirements of all stakeholders -- and the public -- is a daunting task.

"There is this tension in the [law]," he said. "On the one hand, all consumers as defined in the act must have the ability to access a free and convenient system. That means without limitation. On the other hand, the law says we have to give each one of the manufacturers an obligation in pounds, which is a finite number. "

Martorano of Magnum and Kruzan of ANJR said New Jersey recycling stakeholders have begun a push to alter specifics of the law so that the companies responsible for collecting and processing the material are guaranteed the compensation they need.

"The program fell apart," said Martorano. "And without the legislation changing, it's only going to get worse."

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Save the date for E-Scrap 2014

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 13:00
Save the date for E-Scrap 2014

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

March 28, 2014

The nation's largest gathering of e-scrap professionals is set for October in Orlando, Florida.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held October 22-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now for E-Scrap 2014 where you'll encounter business-boosting education sessions and extensive networking opportunities found nowhere else.

Attendee, sponsorship and exhibitor information will be coming your way this spring. Look for the latest at e-scrapconference.com, and get ready to boost your business by heading to Orlando.

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Certification groups clarify stances on CRT management

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 12:57
Certification groups clarify stances on CRT management

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

March 28, 2014

Industry certification bodies R2 Solutions and Basel Action Network (BAN) released formal clarifications this week on the way certified firms may handle CRT glass.

Issuing a formal rule clarification on March 26, R2 announced board members unanimously moved to ban the use of CRT glass as alternative daily cover (ADC) under the new iteration of the certification. R2 executive director John Lingelbach confirmed there are now no instances in which an R2-certified facility can use CRTs as ADC.

"There are viable downstream options for the subset of CRT glass that top-performing, R2-certified recyclers are processing," Lingelbach said.

BAN, which administers the e-Stewards certification, issued its own rule clarification today.

Emphasizing the challenges smaller recyclers face in paying for the proper downstream processing of CRT glass, BAN reaffirmed its stance that CRT-to-ADC actions do not constitute recycling but can be "used as a last resort" for disposal by its members.

"We believe that at this juncture where the market is already dangerously constricted, any further prohibitions should only be considered if they are based on sound science and a life-cycle approach examining all significant environmental and social impacts," the release reads. It also states that the group is engaged in "a science-based review of global CRT management practices" and will be reviewing the definition of "as a last resort" as used in the e-Stewards certification language.

The downstream processor likely to be most affected by R2's ban on the practice of using CRTs as ADC is Kuusakoski U.S. Through a partnership with Peoria Disposal Company (PDC), Kuusakoski runs a CRT-to-ADC operation in Peoria, Illinois and has hopes to process up to 50,000 tons of glass every year for the next decade.

Kuusakoski's Philadelphia facility is both R2 and e-Stewards certified. However, the company's Peoria, Illinois facility, which is actively involved in the ADC operation, is not certified to either standard.

Lingelbach told E-Scrap News R2 Solutions and Kuusakoski held a conference call on Thursday, but he said the certification status of Kuusakoski's Philadelphia facility was not discussed. Kuusakoski's Anssi Takala clarified with E-Scrap News its Philadelphia facility can operate as a transfer hub for CRTs bound for Illinois but "our target is that customers with CRT glass or intact CRT devices ship it directly Peoria."

In addition, Takala told E-Scrap News the recycling firm and PDC "respectfully disagree" with the R2 clarification. "We have shared our concerns with R2 concerning its press release, and have challenged them to provide more information to the public that supports its decision on the viability question," Takala said. "Furthermore, we have agreed to furnish additional information to R2 on this matter."

According to a Kuusakoski white paper released last fall, aside from Kuusakoski, there are only three North American final recovery options for U.S. glass in North America. The paper also states annual glass supply far oustrips the industry's ability to handle the challenging material.

The paper advances the key argument that high levels of lead found in the funnel glass portion of CRTs are essentially locked within the glass by the technology employed by Kuusakoski and PDC, ensuring that it will not leach once used as ADC at landfills.

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U.K. export laws too lax on CRTs?

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 12:56
U.K. export laws too lax on CRTs?

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

March 28, 2014

Leaded glass recycling firms in the U.K. say export rules are hindering domestic CRT recycling efforts.

A contingent of U.K. companies, headlined by SWEEEP Kuusakoski and Environcom, argue CRT glass exported to the Netherlands for processing and then used in interlocking concrete blocks by A. Jansen B.V. are held to environmental treatment standards that are lower than those in the U.K.

Simon Greer, whose company, NuLife Glass, built the glass furnace currently utilized by SWEEEP Kuusakoski in Kent, England, told E-Scrap News the CRT funnel glass used in A. Jansen B.V.'s Legioblocks "still has its lead content." Once manufactured, the blocks head back to the U.K. for use in temporary and permanent building projects, remaining, according to Greer, "a future hazardous waste"

SWEEEP Kuusakoski managing director Patrick Watts called the process "a cheap way out," adding, "CRT recycling firms all compete. If there is a cheap loophole they can use, they will." Of particular concern is a "Trans Frontier Shipment" approval granted to the Dutch company by the U.K.'s Environment Agency (EA). SWEEEP Kuusakoski and others, including Environcom, would like to see EA revoke its approval and look into whether A. Jansen B.V.'s Legioblocks contain lead levels exceeding regulatory limits. Several parliamentary members have seconded the call for a further review of the issue.

An EA spokesperson told MRW: "The facility accepting the waste is regulated by the competent authority. We accept the view of the Dutch authority that it is a properly regulated recycling facility."

A. Jansen B.V.'s Marianne Kleingeld told E-Scrap News the company's Legioblocks are processed "in accordance with Dutch legislation and WEEELABEX." Kleingeld also said the company was working on a "unisonous statement" to address the recent spate of criticism.

While EU member nations all adopt a basic set of CRT management rules, it is the job of each nation to interpret and implement those guidelines. The U.K. is known to have some of the most stringent CRT management rules in place among its EU partners.

Each year more than 140,000 tons of CRT and flat panel displays enter the U.K. waste stream. About 85 percent are CRT devices, said Watts of SWEEEP Kuusakoski.

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Tablet shipments expected to see 40 percent growth this year

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 12:55
Tablet shipments expected to see 40 percent growth this year

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

March 28, 2014

Research group Gartner says worldwide device shipments in 2014 will show growth despite continued declines in PC shipments.

Overall device shipments are projected to increase by 6.9 percent in 2014, reaching 2.5 billion units during the year. Mobile phone shipments, accounting for about 75 percent of overall device shipments, are expected to total 1.9 billion units, a 4.9 percent increase from 2013 levels.

Tablet shipments are expected to post tremendous growth this year. Tablet shipments will reach 270.7 million units in 2014, up 38.6 percent, Gartner says.

PC shipments, a category including both desk-based and notebook computers, "will continue to hamper the overall growth of devices," however. Rosy mobile phone numbers and even rosier tablet figures for 2014 are expected to be offset – to some degree – by a decrease of 6.6 percent in PC shipments. PC shipments, after reaching 296.1 million units last year, will fall to 270.7 million units in 2014.

Looking ahead to 2015, Gartner expects tablet shipments to surpass PC shipments for the first time on record. As the tablet market saturates, Gartner expects replacements of PCs by tablets to slow. "As they do this, we will see where dedicated devices (such as tablets) … fit in the overall portfolio of devices," Gartner research director Ranjit Atwal said.

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Patent watch

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 12:54
Patent watch

March 28, 2014

Xerox Corporation, headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut, was given Patent No. 8,662,649, which describes a method of printing from an inkjet printer using recycled ink.

Patent No. 8,668,540 was awarded to Santa Clara, California's ECS Refining for a method of separating the glass panel from cathode ray tubes.

A method for removing personal information from an electronic device before recycling is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140059696, awarded to ATC Logistics & Electronics, Inc. from Fort Worth, Texas.

Osaka, Japan's Panasonic Corp. was awarded Patent Application No. 20140059857, which describes a method of dismantling and recycling refrigerators.

Patent Application Nos. 20140060250 and 20140069234 were given to Sumimoto Metal Mining for two different methods for recycling lithium-ion batteries.

Wilmington, Delaware's Empire Technology Development LLC was awarded Patent Application No. 20140068929, which describes a method for disassembling and recycling batteries.

A method for recovering rare earth elements is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140072509, awarded to Albert Vierheilig, from Savannah, Georgia.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Certification scorecard from E-Scrap News

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 12:53
Certification scorecard

March 28, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a round-up of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Affordable Shred of Springfield, Illinois; Alliance Document Shredding of Sulphur Springs, Texas; ASDD (a division of nonprofit group The Centers for Habilitation) of Tempe, Arizona; Beckley’s, Inc. of Rochester, Minnesota; Docu Shred, Inc. of East Grand Forks, Minnesota; Hoosier Shred LLC of Indianapolis; Secure A Cycle/Shredway of Matraville, Australia; Secure Data Destruction Company of Chester Hill, Australia; Security Mobile Shredding, Inc. of Boyce, Louisiana; Shred Ace of Durham, North Carolina; Shredder’s, Inc. of Halifax, Canada; The Shredding Company, Inc. of Gaithersburg, Maryland; and Wiggins Shredding, Inc. of West Chester, Pennsylvania have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Regional Computer Recycling & Recovery of Victor, New York has renewed its NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Announcement: E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits from E-Scrap News

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 03/28/2014 - 12:52
NewsBits

March 28, 2014

A Chinese metals executive says the Asian nation is reintroducing a rebate on value-added tax for domestic processors of scrap copper. China's finance ministry has not confirmed the rebate, which is aimed at improving weak domestic demand for scrap copper and could lead to greater import activity as a result.

Oregon's statewide e-scrap collection program has reported bringing in 27.7 million pounds of material in 2013, a gain of almost 4 percent compared with 2012.

Tech site Deal News has detailed the refurbished electronics programs run by some of the industry's biggest players, including Apple, Dell and Sony. The list notes some programs offer 50 percent discounts on as-good-as-new products and encourages consumers to shop green and contribute to the growing reuse culture in the U.S.

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Major Midwest plastics recycling firm closes

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:49
Major Midwest plastics recycling firm closes

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

One of the country's largest plastics reclaimers has abruptly closed its doors.

Maine Plastics, headquartered in Zion, Illinois, ceased operations "due to the actions taken by our bank," according to an automated email reply from company CEO David Kaplan. The news first broke in a story by Plastics News reporter Frank Esposito.

Ranked as the eighth-largest plastics recycling firm in the U.S. by Plastics News, Maine Plastics once operated nine facilities. Maine Plastics' annual throughput had fallen from 178 million pounds in 2012 to 162 million pounds in 2013. The company website indicates annual processing of more than 140 million pounds.

A request for comment on the closure was not immediately returned.

Kaplan's automated email reply does note at least the possibility of "further developments which would allow the resumption of deliveries."

Maine Plastics was founded in 1983 and handled both post-industrial and post-commercial plastics. Publicly traded Casella Waste Systems recently acquired A Greener Solution, Maine Plastics' environmental management wing. The division designs and implements recycling programs for industrial clients.

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Do you have recycling's next big idea?

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:48
Do you have recycling's next big idea?

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

The second annual Recycling Innovators Forum is set to offer funding for ideas that have the potential to transform recycling collection or processing. The application process for the contest is now open.

Sponsored by Alcoa, the American Chemistry Council, Coca-Cola Recycling, Resource Recycling and Waste Management, the 2014 Recycling Innovators Forum is a venue for inventors and innovative organizations to present their game-changing ideas on how to advance the industry. The Forum offers innovators throughout the recycling community the chance to compete for additional funding, marketing opportunities and industry support.

Co-located with the annual Resource Recycling Conference, the Forum is designed to elevate the best and brightest ideas in recycling to the national stage and connect innovators to the companies, institutions and organizations that can help turn great concepts into reality. Original ideas, inventions and processes presented at the Forum are "shovel-ready" and capable of producing a palpable and immediate impact on the recycling industry.

The competition will be held on Sept. 15, the day before the start of the 2014 Resource Recycling Conference in New Orleans, and will award two $20,000 prizes to the top two of the 10 Forum finalists.

For more information about competing in, or attending, this free event, visit recyclinginnovators.com.

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Scrap plastics exports stay flat in January

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:47
Scrap plastics exports stay flat in January

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

During the first month of this year, exports of scrap plastics of all resin types were flat compared with both December 2013 and year-over-year (YOY) figures.

Export totals in January, the most recent month for which data is available, saw a small decline of 0.9 percent from December 2013 levels. With 354.98 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in January 2014, the YOY volume of plastic scrap exports was also down slightly, by 3.2 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in January, at 19.34 cents per pound, was flat, down by just 0.8 percent from its December 2013 standing. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was also mostly level, up by 1.2 percent.

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MRFs taking on more plastic foodservice packaging

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:47
MRFs taking on more plastic foodservice packaging

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

A new survey on foodservice packaging (FSP) accepted at North American materials recovery facilities provides some much needed food for thought.

"We have found that both the industry and consumers often think these products are not recycled, " Lynn Dyer, president of Foodservice Packaging Institute (FPI), said in a press release. "This study not only refutes that assumption but shows promise for increased acceptance."

Of the 62 North American MRFs surveyed, nearly two-thirds accepted at least 10 of the 19 types of FSP. Upwards of 70 percent accept rigid plastics, such as cups and takeout containers, an overview of study results states.

Also of note, the survey findings suggest MRF size and type do not correlate to acceptance rates or levels.

Cups, beverage carriers, containers and a variety of egg cartons were the least accepted items, with less than 50 percent of participants accepting the material for recycling.

The press release notes that while "not intended to substantiate claims of recyclability in compliance with the Federal Trade Commission's 'Green Guides,'" the results indicate a "number of items are in fact reaching thresholds that might allow these products to be labeled 'recyclable.'"

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<i>PetroChem Wire</i>: Recycled HIPS up a penny in March

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:33
PetroChem Wire: Recycled HIPS up a penny in March

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

An increase in recycled polystyrene prices in March continues a trend tied to prime PS prices, which have been firming.

Recycled HIPS white pellet, which was selling at the end of January around 68 to 70 cents per pound, was up to 73 to 75 cents per pound in mid-March. Sellers of recycled HIPS and GPPS have faced weakening demand from their customers, but recycled GPPS natural flake prices still rose slightly to 38 to 40 cents per pound in early March, also following the direction of the prime market.

In the prime polystyrene market, HIPS price rose a penny in the first half of March to $1.15 per pound.

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Patent watch

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:30
Patent watch

Take a look at some of the latest industry innovations moving through the patent process, including a California company's technology for creating wax products out of recovered resins.

A method for producing a polymer filled with long fibers is the subject of Patent No. 8,661,705, which was given to EREMA Recycling from Ansfelden, Austria.

Patent No. 8,664,284 was given to a group of researchers led by William A. Farone for a method of depolymerizing polymers by way of pyrolysis.

Greenmantra Recycling, from Toronto, California, was awarded Patent No. 8,664,458, which describes a method of making wax products from recycled plastic materials.

Shawano, Wisconsin's Wisconsin Film & Bag, Inc. was given Patent Application No. 20140048631, which describes a method of recycling post-consumer scrap plastic film.

Krones AG, headquartered in Neutraubling, Germany, was awarded Patent Application No. 20140060747 for a method and device for de-labeling and recycling plastic containers.

Patent Application No. 20140061967 was given to CPG International, Inc. from Scranton, Pennsylvania, for a method of making composite polymer materials from multi-layer plastic materials composed of polyethylene/polyethylene terephthalate/aluminum film that may be extruded with organic filler for wood-substitute products, such as deck boards or fencing.

Beaverton, Oregon's Nike, Inc. was given Patent Application No. 20140066530, which describes a method of recycling ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) resin using scrap and virgin material.

 

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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 03/27/2014 - 15:28
NewsBits

Oral care company Colgate and grocery chain ShopRite have partnered to launch an oral care packaging recycling program for schools within several Eastern states. The school that recycles the most packaging between March 16 and June 30 and earns the most votes from their community members will be awarded a TerraCycle recycled plastic playground valued at more than $50,000. The latest count shows two New Jersey schools battling for the lead: Beloved Community Charter School of Jersey City and St. Joseph the Carpenter of Roselle.

A $1.1 million expansion at Allied Reprocessing's Ripley, Tennessee facility could triple the company's workforce. Currently employing 16, Allied Reprocessing expects to add 31 employees as a result of the expansion, which will enhance the company's processing capacity of agricultural plastics.

Farmers in Vermont are being encouraged to recycle ag-plastics for free through a pilot program aimed at boosting plastics recycling rates in the state. Generating more than 500 tons of plastic, Vermont dairy farmers have typically relied on landfilling plastic scrap – and paid for it out of their own pockets.

 

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