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Experts detail keys to film collection success

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:42
Experts detail keys to film collection success

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

While retail locations provide the best collection points for post-consumer film plastics, governments and haulers play a crucial role in ensuring a successful program, according to speakers on a recent webinar.

Local governments have various communications channels through which to communicate with the public, and they have local credibility, said Becky Curtis, recycling assistant at the Department of Public Works in Milwaukee.

"When the community hears from us, it makes a difference in their behavior," she said.

Curtis was participating in a webinar hosted by the U.S. EPA and focused on best practices to improve film recycling. The July 16 webinar also included Shari Jackson, director of film recycling at the American Chemistry Council's (ACC) Plastics Division, and Nina Butler, managing director of Moore Recycling Associates.

The webinar focused on the efforts of the Wrap Recycling Action Program (WRAP), a project started in 2014 by the Flexible Film Recycling Group at ACC. Moore Recycling Associates helps manage the WRAP effort.

The WRAP project partnered with Milwaukee to boost film recycling. In 2014, collection bins and signs were installed at 10 Roundy's Supermarkets locations in Milwaukee and nearby suburbs, Curtis said. Signs told consumers that films should not be placed in curbside bins and gave examples of the types of films to be deposited in store collection bins.

In addition, 4,000 fliers were sent to the stores to be placed in customers' bags at check-out, she said. Stores already commonly communicate with customers using that method, so it was easy to incorporate the fliers into the process. Customer surveys showed the project increased awareness about where – and which types of – films can be recycled, Curtis said.

WRAP counts among its partners four retailers, one state government, 20 local governments/communities and two materials recovery facilities, Jackson said.

"Success really depends on state and municipal governments becoming more engaged and involved," she said.

Across the country, 18,000 stores accept films for recycling, Jackson said.

The U.S. recovery rate for plastic bags, wraps and sacks was about 13.5 percent in 2013, according to EPA estimates.

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Look into the future of resin pricing at Plastics Recycling 2016

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:41
Look into the future of resin pricing at Plastics Recycling 2016

July 22, 2015

The plastics recycling industry's most pivotal gathering is headed to New Orleans next February. Register now to make sure your business gets a big boost in the Big Easy.

The February 2016 gathering of top plastics recycling executives will be the 11th iteration of the conference. Plastics Recycling 2015 welcomed more than 1,500 attendees from 32 countries, and a packed exhibit hall featured nearly 200 leading companies. Expect even more education, networking and inspiration in New Orleans.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and find out more about exhibiting and/or sponsoring at the premier conference for plastics recovery.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET pellet prices fall slightly

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:40
PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET pellet prices fall slightly

July 22, 2015

Recycled PET clear FDA pellets sold mid-July at 70 to 73 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast and other U.S. locations, down 1 cent per pound from the beginning of the month.

Recycled PET clear bottle grade and food grade sheet regrind was also down 1 cent per pound, with business done at 49 to 50 cents per pound FOB Midwest.

Post-consumer PET pellets still commanded at least a nickel more than U.S.-produced prime bottle/packaging grade PET, which was reported at 65 to 69 cents per pound on a delivered Midwest basis. Also in the prime PET market last week, imports of packaging grade were booked at 55 to 59 cents per pound, delivered U.S. locations.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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New Zealand grants fund film collections, recycling facility

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:39
New Zealand grants fund film collections, recycling facility

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

The New Zealand government will fund efforts to create a plastic film recycling infrastructure while avoiding bag bans or fees.

The island country of 4.5 million people currently has no film recycling program.

Environment Minister Nick Smith announced the government will provide a $700,000 ($465,000 U.S. dollars) grant to the Packaging Forum and a $510,000 ($339,00 USD) grant to plastics recycling company Astron Plastics Group. The money comes from the Waste Minimisation Fund.

Funding to the Packaging Forum, which operates voluntary stewardship programs, will help establish collection points over the next three years at retail locations. Films will be picked up by a program called REDcycle, which currently runs collections in Australia. Initially, bales will be shipped to Australia for recycling, until facilities can be constructed in New Zealand to recycle them, according to the Packaging Forum.

The long-term objective will be to have drop-off locations within 12 miles of 70 percent of the New Zealand population, Smith said.

Lyn Mayes, manager of the Public Place Recycling Scheme, a stewardship program under the Packaging Forum umbrella, stated in a press release the public will be able to drop off a range of films — "basically anything made of plastic which can be scrunched into a ball."

The government's grant to Astron Plastics Group will help enable recycling of up to 2,200 tons of soft plastics per year at a facility in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city. With facilities in Australia and New Zealand, Astron specializes in recycling HDPE, LDPE and PP.

"We have well-established recycling infrastructure at our Auckland premises but are limited in terms of our ability to process contaminated soft plastic," Steve Mead, Astron business manager, told Plastics Recycling Update. "The government funding will be used to procure and install a MAS DRD (dry-cleaning) system so that we can pre-clean the post-consumer plastic bag material prior to our normal recycling processes (extrusion, melt filtration, degassing, pelletizing). We will then use the recycled resin to extrude sheeting products such as cable cover and flat sheet."

Environment Minister Smith, a member of the governing center-right National Party, said the funding strategy "is a more sensible approach than a ban or a compulsory levy on just plastic shopping bags."

The country's left-wing Green Party supported the recycling plan but said more needs to be done to reduce plastic bag usage.

“We still need a levy on plastic bags and to move towards an outright ban on their use – like in Australia where most states either have a ban or a levy on flimsy single-use plastic bags," Green Party spokeswoman and Member of Parliament Denise Roche stated in a press release.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:38
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 22, 2015

The British Plastics Federation calls a department store chain's decision to halt plastic water bottle sales "misguided," and a city in the UAE looks to move toward zero waste.

The British Plastics Federation is criticizing London's iconic department store chain Selfridges for its decision to stop selling water in plastic bottles. The U.K. plastics trade association said recycling is the key to preventing litter, not "indiscriminately banning products." Selfridges said its decision would remove roughly 400,000 plastic bottles per year from it stores.

Surrey County, England could save money for frontline services if every resident recycled one additional plastic container a week, county leaders said. The Surrey County Council says the jurisdiction could save the equivalent of $324,000 a year if every adult recycled just one additional bottle a week.

The Australian packaging industry is considering cutting its 70 percent recycling goal, because new calculations show the recycling rate is worse than previously thought, according to The Sydney Morning Herald. New estimates of plastics imports led to a revised recycling rate calculation significantly below the goal – one expert put the adjusted recycling rate at 29 percent.

Sharjah, part of the United Arab Emirates, aims to be the first Arab city to send zero waste to landfill. The Sharjah Environment Co. plans to open two recycling facilities: one recycling plastics and the other cardboard, according to The National.

 

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NewsBits from Plastics Recycling Update

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 07/21/2015 - 16:36
NewsBits

July 22, 2015

Chicago's ban on plastic bags is set to begin Aug. 1, but according to an article in the Chicago Sun-Times plastic bags won't disappear altogether. Under the city's ban, which passed in May 2014, retailers and grocers are permitted to provide customers with slightly thicker reusable plastic bags and companies such as Target and Jewel-Osco are planning to do just that.

A 3-D printer capable of using recycled resins in the manufacturing of new products could be headed for outer space in the not-so-distant future, reports the Christian Science Monitor. The maker of the R3DO printer, Made in Space, says the literal product launch could occur within the next 12 to 16 months and represents a key step in providing space crews with the ability to both manage their waste and produce timely products and parts during space missions.

A feather-ruffling story appearing last month in the Washington Post on the state of the recycling industry has been taken to task by Mother Jones magazine. In an article written by journalist Luke Whelan, four "big recycling myths" perpetuated by the original piece are considered and challenged, including the role plastics packaging has played in the current "crisis."

A judge rejected a request by the Natural Resources Defense Council to intervene in the legal fight over New York City's decision to ban expanded polystyrene food-service products. Meanwhile, more than 1,000 business owners have signed a petition calling on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to reverse the administration's decision to ban expanded polystyrene food-service products, according to the Restaurant Action Alliance. In its latest press release, the Restaurant Action Alliance, a group led by Dart Container Corp., says the city's decision hurts small businesses.

 

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Seattle food scrap law challenged

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:05
Seattle organics law challenged

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 21, 2015

Seattle's mandated composting program may have a legal battle on its hands after a lawsuit emerged last week challenging the constitutionality of its enforcement practices.

In a complaint filed July 16, the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF) takes aim at a 2014 city ordinance banning the disposal of food scraps and yard debris and giving garbage collectors the authority to fine city residents whose garbage cans contain at least 10 percent organics. The PLF, representing eight individuals, claims Washington state's constitution "prohibits government searches of garbage cans without first obtaining a warrant."

"The City's garbage inspection law violates privacy rights on a massive scale," the suit reads.

The ordinance, which was passed unanimously by City Council members in 2014 and signed into law the next day, went into effect Jan. 1. Fines, which are expected to total $1 per violation, have been delayed until at least 2016 due to the early success of the ban.

According to PLF, which is a noted privacy rights group in the region, approximately 9,000 warning notices were handed out to Seattle residents between January and April.

In a joint statement released Monday, the city attorney's office and Seattle Public Utilities stated the ordinance "fully complies with the law, including the enhanced privacy protections afforded by the Washington constitution."

"There is no intention of opening trash bags," the statement reads in part. "Containers are only tagged if the contamination is clearly visible. The guidelines state: if you can’t see, don’t report it and don’t tag it."

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Stay at the center of Resource Recycling Conference 2015

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:05
Stay at the center of Resource Recycling Conference 2015

July 21, 2015

The Resource Recycling Conference is proud to have chosen the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown as this year's conference venue and host hotel. The Indianapolis Marriott offers premier accommodations in the heart of Indiana's capital.

To get the most out of your conference experience we recommend you stay at the host hotel, where hundreds of recycling professionals will be an open door away. Your room reservation at the conference host hotel ensures lower registration rates for current and future years.

Book your reservations here.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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CalRecycle makes change at the top

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:05
CalRecycle makes change at the top

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 21, 2015

California has named Scott Smithline the director of the state's Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery.

Smithline, formerly the assistant director for policy development at the department (also known as CalRecycle), was appointed to the role by California Gov. Jerry Brown on July 16. Before joining the state in 2011, Smithline worked for 12 years at nonprofit group Californians Against Waste.

His appointment comes as the state is attempting to increase its recycling rate to 75 percent by 2020, a goal set forth by Assembly Bill 341, which passed in 2011.

The state's current recycling rate is 50 percent, but has remained stagnant over the past couple of years.

"Gov. Brown has established for California the most progressive environmental goals in the nation, and the strides that have already been taken have laid a strong foundation to achieve them," Smithline said in a statement sent to Resource Recycling. "That said, there is a lot of work to be done to build a better recycling infrastructure and develop more resilient in-state markets for recycled materials. We have to think about what changes need to be made to the current model in order to get where we want to be five or 10 years down the road."

Smithline's predecessor, Caroll Mortensen, served as director of CalRecycle since 2011. She is now senior environmental specialist within the Legislative and External Affairs Office at CalRecycle, the agency's spokesperson Mark Oldfield confirmed.

Mark Murray, the executive director of Californians Against Waste, was supportive of the appointment. "Scott possesses a truly unparalleled level of policy expertise, stakeholder awareness, and passion for recycling and environmental issues," Murray said in a statement.

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Phoenix takes action with recovery rate goal approaching

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:04
Phoenix takes action with recovery rate goal approaching

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 21, 2015

Phoenix is mulling over dozens of recycling ideas to incorporate at its planned Resource Innovation Campus. In the meantime, city government will partner with groups to recycle carpeting, mattresses and food scraps.

The city of 1.4 million people aims to divert 40 percent of its municipal solid waste stream from landfill by 2020. It currently diverts 16 percent of its residential stream from landfill, according to the city's Public Works Department.

Phoenix this spring issued a request for proposals for recovering a number of non-packaging materials: single-use batteries, mattresses, carpet and carpet foam, furniture, latex paint, palm fronds and residential food scraps.

After receiving a total of eight proposals, city staff recommended pursuing deals with the following groups, according to Public Works: Planet Recycling (to recycle carpeting and carpet foams), Goodwill of Central Arizona (mattresses) and Recycled City LLC (residential food scraps).

Staff will negotiate contracts with the organizations with the intention of returning in the fall to seek Council approval.

Meanwhile, the City last spring began working to bring projects and companies to its planned Resource Innovation Campus, to be located near an existing city-operated transfer station and ReCommunity-operated MRF. The City put out a call to innovators and is currently sifting through proposals.

Phoenix plans to dedicate at least 50 acres at the campus to innovators and manufacturers with market-ready technologies and manufacturing processes. It also plans to create a business incubator for startup technologies and processes as well as a composting facility.

The efforts are part of the Reimagine Phoenix initiative to reduce waste.

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Wide world of recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:03
Wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 21, 2015

A recycling plant opens in Jerusalem and the latest numbers out of England point to an overall increase in waste generation in major cities.

A sprawling recycling plant in Jerusalem has opened its doors to handle a reported 400,000 tons of material annually. According to an article in the Jerusalem Post, the facility has been in construction since 2011 and will save the city nearly $4.7 million each year in avoided landfill fees.

An article on letsrecycle.com reports urban centers throughout England are seeing waste generation increase. In North London, Liverpool and Manchester, the latest figures indicate more waste being generated by residents despite a push to increase waste reduction and recycling.

The European Parliament's call for a beefed-up circular economy has received the support of the European Bioplastics trade group. In a press release issued July 14, the group commends the effort and notes the strategy creates potential for plastic packaging manufacturers to increasingly resort to, you guessed, bio-plastics.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Push your career forward

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:03
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Push your career forward

July 21, 2015

The sixth-annual Resource Recycling Conference offers attendees plenty of opportunities to increase their standing in the fast-evolving materials recovery industry.

The Recycling Conference is now approved for eight Continuing Education Units (CEU) from SWANA. Attendees working toward that certification can pick up a CEU report form at the registration desk at the conference.

In addition, attendees will have unique opportunities to network with some of the top decision-makers in all areas of recycling. Professionals are drawn to the conference's slate of well-curated education sessions as well as co-located events including the National Recycling Coalition's annual members meeting, The Recycling Partnership workshops and the Recycling Innovators Forum.

The array of programming geared to leading recycling executives and officials simply cannot be found at any other North American recycling gathering.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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NewsBits from Resource Recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:02
NewsBits

July 21, 2015

Since opening 25 years ago, the Springfield Materials Recycling Facility in Springfield, Mass. has processed 1 million tons of material and saved communities in western Massachusetts approximately $62 million in landfill fees. That's according to an article in The Republican newspaper recapping the facility's quarter-of-a-century-long run in the region.

A report from KVOA in Tucson, Ariz. suggests 20 percent of the material that finds its way into curbside recycling bins is not, in fact, recyclable. Among the contaminants: diapers to construction and demolition debris into their blue bins.

A feather-ruffling story appearing in the Washington Post last month on the state of the recycling industry has been taken to task by the magazine Mother Jones.  In an article written by journalist Luke Whelan, four "big recycling myths" perpetuated by the original piece are considered and challenged.

Taking note of the importance of public space recycling, the National Park Service and the National Parks Conservation Association have announced three national parks – Yosemite, Grand Teton and Denali – will attempt to achieve zero waste status. Car manufacturer Subaru will lend technical assistance to the project.

A contract between Waste Management and Oakland, Calif. saw composting service rates for businesses jump dramatically, and those monthly costs are now more than garbage rates, according to the East Bay Express. After an outcry that the rates were disincentivizing participation in the program, the City is now considering an ordinance that would limit organics collection rates to no more than 90 percent of the garbage rates.

You can't throw recyclable materials in the trash in Vermont, but, if you do, the garbage police aren't coming after you either. The Burlington Free Press reports that while a mandatory recycling law has taken effect, resource-strapped governments and laws hindering the ability of government officials to search trash cans means little enforcement will be occurring at the curb.

More than 1,000 business owners have signed a petition calling on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to reverse the administration's decision to ban expanded polystyrene food-service products, according to the Restaurant Action Alliance. In its latest press release, the Restaurant Action Alliance, a group led by Dart Container Corp., says the decision hurts small businesses. The group earlier this month noted the city won't issue fines until 2016 and offers an exemption process for small businesses that can prove alternative materials will be too costly.

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Industry and supplier news

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 17:02
Industry and supplier news

July 21, 2015

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries has launched isriadvocacy.org, a venue for the group's members to voice their concerns and views to members of Congress. For more, click here.

The National Materials Marketplace is officially up and running thanks to support from more than 20 companies, including Eastman Chemical, Nike, Novelis and Dow Chemical. For more, click here.

Global Experience Specialists (GES) has achieved level two certification under APEX/ASTM Environmentally Sustainable Event Standards, an international sustainability standard for the meeting and event industry. GES is the general service contractor for trade show logistics at conferences produced by Resource Recycling, Inc., including the Resource Recycling Conference. For more, click here.

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Global markets examined at E-Scrap 2015

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 08:06
Global markets examined at E-Scrap 2015

July 16, 2015

The U.S. electronics recycling sector is increasingly influenced by e-scrap developments in other areas of the world, and at the upcoming E-Scrap 2015 conference the international sphere will be fully covered.

One highly anticipated session will feature noted journalist Adam Minter, Basel Action Network chief Jim Puckett and Latin American market expert Ramzy Kahhat. What nations are producing the highest volumes of end-of-life material and where are processing opportunities developing? Those topics and more will be debated and discussed by the diverse trio of experts.

Another conference session will parse out realities on the ground in one of the world's most discussed e-scrap hotspots: Agbogbloshie, Ghana. This captivating panel will feature views from those that are familiar with the scrap yards in Agbogbloshie as well as experts who have extensively researched e-scrap flows.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 – the week before Labor Day – at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for the latest on attending, sponsoring and exhibiting.

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Foul play suspected in Boston CRT warehouse blaze

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 08:06
Foul play suspected in Boston CRT warehouse blaze

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

July 16, 2015

A warehouse full of CRT TVs and monitors in Massachusetts has burned down in a suspected case of arson.

The warehouse, located in Brockton, Mass. and operated by CRT Recycling, Inc. (CRTR), went up in flames July 11, requiring fire crews to work for several hours to put out the fire.

The Massachusetts State Fire Department has determined the fire "was intentionally set," according to a report from Boston TV news station WCVB. No one was believed to be injured as a result of the four-alarm blaze, but the 24,000-square-foot warehouse and its contents, including thousands of televisions and computer monitors, were irreparably damaged, according to the report.

The Basel Action Network (BAN) has raised concerns about the environmental and human health risks posed by the fire.

"The fire blew a wide plume of pollutants over nearby residential areas and a shopping center," BAN stated in a press release. "The burning of TVs and monitors creates very toxic and carcinogenic smoke and fumes containing brominated dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons."

In 2009, BAN reported CRTR was found to be illegally shipping CRTs to Indonesia and China.

CRTR's owner Peter Kopcych did not provide a comment by press time.

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CORRECTION: North Carolina bill aims to dismantle e-scrap program

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 08:05
CORRECTION: North Carolina bill aims to dismantle e-scrap program

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

July 16, 2015

A bill that's passed through North Carolina's Senate would repeal the state's electronics recycling program.

House Bill 765, which passed North Carolina's Senate by a vote of 31-17 last week and aims to cut a number of regulatory provisions beyond those dealing with e-scrap, now sits in the House Committee for the Environment. The 23-member committee is expected to meet July 21 to discuss the legislation and hear public comment.

Counties with e-scrap recycling programs already in place are fearful the bill, which calls for an end of the state's manufacturer-funded electronics recycling structure, will lead to six-figure collection costs for local governments and a possible cutting back of services.

"Rough cost estimates can be greater than $100,000 each year based on our current tonnage," Eric Gerringer, the recycling programs manager for Orange County, North Carolina, told E-Scrap News. "Whether or not we reduce services is something we would need to review."

Orange County is located in the Raleigh-Durham area and includes the municipality of Chapel Hill.

Lisa Rider, the assistant director of coastal Onslow County's solid waste department, says while she's committed to continuing to provide recycling services, annual costs could exceed $150,000 to do so.

"It's going to be up to us to figure out how we're going to cover that expense," Rider said.

North Carolina's current e-scrap program requires manufacturers of computers and televisions to pay annual program fees of up to $17,500 to help fund community-based collection and recycling programs and events for end-of-life electronics. TV manufacturers also pay the full recycling cost for tonnages of material based on national market share.

Those fees and quotas have allowed counties in the state to receive free or low-cost recycling services from a number of local and national processors.

If the bill were to become law, manufacturer fees and recycling requirements would be eliminated. Rider of Onslow County said a trailer-load of materials would cost the county $5,000 to $6,000 to handle "where before, it was free."

Molly Diggins, the director of the North Carolina chapter of the Sierra Club, said the e-scrap program, in place since July 2010, "has been a resounding success."

"It's convenient, it's free for consumers, it's available for all 100 counties in North Carolina and it has addressed an important environmental need," Diggins said. "From talking to members in the House, we know they're hearing a fair amount about this bill from local governments that are very concerned, and they're hearing from recycling companies themselves."

Diggins said the "House is perhaps not seeing why we need to make this change – that doesn't mean they won't, but they at least think the question should be asked."

Introduced in April as a one-page bill regarding restrictions for load-bearing vehicles on state highways, the nearly 60-page bill now known as the Regulatory Reform Act of 2015 has undergone a sizable makeover since its initial introduction.  The bill calls for a number of cuts to "unnecessary or outdated statutes or regulations," among them the state's electronics recycling program.

North Carolina's landfill ban on electronics would not be repealed under the legislation, which was introduced by Rep. Pat McElrath, a Republican who represents a district near North Carolina's northern coast.

McElrath did not return a request for comment.

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Electronic Recyclers International (ERI) was opposed to the N.C. legislation.  It should be noted that ERI has never commented on its position.  E-Scrap News regrets the error.

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NYC apartment program covers 1 million residents

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 08:05
NYC apartment program covers 1 million residents

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

July 16, 2015

More than 1 million residents of the Big Apple are now signed up for an apartment-based e-scrap recycling program.

Such hyper-local collection service is key in a city where more than half of inhabitants don't own cars.

“That we now regularly provide responsible, effective recycling for more than a million New Yorkers’ electronic waste is a huge accomplishment," John Shegerian, chairman and CEO of Electronic Recyclers International (ERI), stated in a press release.

The e-cycleNYC program is a partnership between ERI and the New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY). It is funded by electronics manufacturers. Through the program, buildings with 10 or more units can store e-scrap in a secure, enclosed area and schedule pick-ups. Buildings with 50 or more units can receive a locked bin in which to store the material, and those with 250 or more apartments can work with the program to schedule outdoor e-scrap collection events.

Officials celebrated the program's million-person mark at a press event on July 15 in New York City. The program did its first collection at North Shore Towers in Queens less than two years ago.

“The e-cycleNYC program represents the most innovative and comprehensive electronics recycling service offered in the nation,” DSNY Commissioner Kathryn Garcia stated in the press release. “The program is a true partnership with support from manufacturers as well as both labor and property owners. We’re proud to have set an example for the entire nation and look forward to the continued success of this important initiative.”

During the 2014 fiscal year, the program collected an average of 400 pounds per day of e-scrap, or roughly 73 tons over the course of a year, according to city statistics.

In New York, the vast majority of e-scrap is still collected through other means, including through city-run collection events, the city's internal collection program and take-backs from nonprofit organizations and retailers. Those other methods collected an average of 8 tons per day in 2014, or more than 2,900 tons over the course of the year.

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EU resolution encourages support for product repair

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 08:05
EU resolution encourages support for product repair

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

July 16, 2015

Members of the European Parliament have signaled their belief that repairing and refurbishing products, including electronics, will prove key to Europe's circular economy aspirations.

A committee of the European Parliament approved a resolution asking for a mandatory 70 percent recycling target for all European Union countries by 2030. The request was made to the EU's executive branch, the European Commission, which is tasked with proposing and enforcing legislation.

In addition to overall recycling rate targets, the resolution includes various statements pertinent to the e-scrap recycling sector. It urges the commission to do the following:

  • Consider lower taxes on repair services and higher taxes on non-recyclable, single-use products
  • Develop measures against planned obsolescence and to develop product standards that facilitate dismantling, refurbishment and repair
  • Take steps to ensure "parts containing hazardous substances are clearly identified in product manuals to facilitate separation of those parts prior to recycling"
  • Require information from manufacturers on what resources a product contains
  • Propose requirements that public agencies give purchasing preference to reused, repaired, refurbished or otherwise sustainable products

The resolution, called "On Resource Efficiency: Moving Towards a Sustainable Economy," comes as the European Commission reviews comments and develops its circular economy proposal late in 2015. The new strategy will include a proposed law on waste and recycling targets.

In 2014, the commission approved recommended targets but withdrew the package this year so it could work on a more ambitious strategy, according to the commission's environment department.



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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 08:04
Certification scorecard

July 16, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Powerhouse Recycling of Salisbury, N.C. is now certified to the e-Stewards standard.

Citadel Information Management of Westmont, Ill. has achieved NAID Certification for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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