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Report examines Europe’s plastic production, diversion

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 08:06
Report examines Europe’s plastic production, diversion

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Feb. 11, 2015

If current trends continue, Europe could divert 100 percent of its plastics for recycling or energy recovery by 2037.

That’s according to a report from the PlasticsEurope Association of Plastics Manufacturers and the European Association of Plastics Recycling and Recovery Organisations.

From 2006 to 2012, plastic material going to landfill in Europe decreased from 14.22 million tons to 10.58 million tons, a drop of nearly 26 percent. In that time, the amount recycled jumped from 5.18 million tons to 7.28 million tons, a 41 percent increase. The amount burned for energy increased from 7.72 million tons to 9.81 million tons, a 27 percent increase.

In 2012, about 62 percent of all post-consumer plastics in Europe were diverted to recycling or waste-to-energy facilities, according to the report.

Meanwhile, the report predicts a steady, but not dramatic, increase in European plastics productions. In 2014, production was projected to increase 1.5 percent over 2013 levels. In 2015, it is expected to increase 1 percent over 2014 levels.

“Still, the European plastics production remains far from pre-crisis levels,” according to a PlasticsEurope press release.


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Plastic container recycling access hits high in Canada

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 08:02
Plastic container recycling access hits high in Canada

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Feb. 11, 2015

A plastics trade group in Canada says access to recycling plastic containers is at an all-time high despite continued struggles with non-container packaging.

"One of the key factors influencing recycling rates in Canada is whether people have access to recycling programs," the report from the Canadian Plastics Industry Association (CPIA) reads. "As extended producer responsibility schemes proliferate across the country, it is becoming increasingly important for manufacturers and retailers of packaged food and consumer goods to know what percentage of Canadians have access to recycling programs for the packaging they place on the market."

And according to CPIA, containers made from PET, HDPE, LDPE and PP can be collected for recycling by at least 90 percent of the population in Canada, while containers made from PVC and "other" plastics have access rates between 82 and 86 percent.

In fact, the only container type with a sub-80 percent access rate are those made from rigid polystyrene. CPIA says those items can be diverted for recycling by just 63 percent of the population.

The group defined access as the availability of "residential curbside recycling programs, municipal drop-off recycling depots, deposit-return programs for beverage containers or return to-retail (for empty beverage containers only)."

While offering some encouraging access numbers, the research also points to challenges on the non-container side.

"Not all types of plastics are accepted in municipal recycling programs," the report continues. "In Canada, many programs limit the types of plastic they accept to plastic containers, leaving other plastic items to be tossed into the trash."

While 74 percent of the population was found to have access to horticultural rigid plastic recycling, just over half (56 percent) of Canadians have access to film and bag recycling.

Roughly two-thirds of the population (67 percent) has access to retail bag recycling and tubs and lids (66 percent). About one-third can recycle foam food packaging (34 percent) and foam protective packaging (36 percent).

No one in Canada, CPIA found, is able to divert plastic laminate, or flexible film packaging.

The report also includes a full breakdown of access numbers for containers and non-containers by province.

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PetroChem Wire: HDPE scrap prices slip

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 07:54
PetroChem Wire: HDPE scrap prices slip

Feb. 11, 2015

Natural dairy scrap bale prices fell as much as a nickel in early February, with business reported as low as 25 cents per pound GOB U.S. East Coast.

Supply has accumulated in scrap yards and MRF locations throughout the eastern U.S. and Midwest as cold weather slows down pick-ups, processing and deliveries. HDPE mixed-color scrap bales have also weakened, though not as much, with recent business done at 18 to 20 cents per pound FOB U.S. East Coast.

Recycled and prime HDPE prices have also weakened. HDPE frac melt dairy pellets have fallen from 70 to 75 cents per pounds FOB U.S. East Coast at the end of January to 68 to 70 cents per pound the first week in February. Prime blow molding HDPE was at 66.5 cents per pound at the end of January and 64.5 cents per pound on Feb. 6.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Patent watch

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 02:00
Patent watch

Feb. 11, 2015

The recycling of plastic absorbent materials, such as diapers, is the subject of Patent No. 8,940,205, awarded to the Strandex Corporation, based in Madison, Wisconsin.

Patent No. 8,944,274, concerning a waste basket "facilitating the reuse of plastic shopping bags," was given to James Madrid from El Paso, Texas.

Redding, California's Technisoil Industrial LLC was awarded Patent No. 8,950,972 for a method of using recovered polyurethane in asphalt road coverings.

Neenah, Wisconsin-based Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. was awarded Patent Application No. 20140356963 for a tape that indicates whether a wrapped object that has been sterilized can be recycled with the wrap polymer.

Jeffrey Danes and Keith Vorst, from San Luis Obispo and Atascadero, California, respectively, were given Patent Application No. 20140332994 for a method of sorting scrap thermoplastics.

Patent Application No. 20140333002 was awarded to King of Prussia, Pennsylvania-based Arkema, Inc. for a method of recycling multi-layer polymers via a melt process.

An optical sortation device is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140333755, given to Visys NV, which is based in Hasselt, Belgium.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 01:57
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Feb. 11, 2015

Low oil prices are hurting Ghana's plastics recycling sector and a rural recycling program in New Zealand finds its footing. It's all in our global look at plastics recycling.

With oil prices plummeting, Ghana's recycled plastic industry has also taken a nosedive. According to recycling firms there, buyers of plastic feedstock are offering far less for secondary material due to the relatively low cost of making virgin plastics with cheaper oil, leaving reuse-ready plastics without a clear market.

Agrecovery, a free rural recycling program in New Zealand appears to be gaining steam. Funded by manufacturers of agricultural products, the program has set up more than 70 collection sites throughout rural New Zealand in an attempt to recycle at least 50 percent of containers put on the market each year by participating brands.

In an effort to engage French youth and encourage recycling nationwide, Coca-Cola Enterprises has launched an updated virtual tour of a state-of-the-art bottle recycling facility. The project, Infineo 2.0., takes Web visitors on a complete tour of the recycling process, from the moment used bottles arrive at the facility to the preparation of usable flake.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: Analyzing plastics-to-oil tech

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 01:55
Plastics Recycling 2015: Analyzing plastics-to-oil tech

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Feb. 11, 2015

Member companies of the newly established Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance will grace the stage at Plastics Recycling 2015 later this month to dig deep into the current state of PTO in the recycling landscape.

The American Chemistry Council has stated PTO technology has the power to generate up to $9 billion in annual U.S. economic output. Is this sector truly on the verge of explosive growth? The PTO session at Plastics Recycling 2015 will look to offer some answers.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas.. More than 1,775 attendees from 30 countries were on hand at the 2014 edition, and a similar turnout is expected in Dallas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register.


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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 01:51
NewsBits

Feb. 11, 2015

A bill introduced in the Oregon legislature would require school districts to phase out the use of expanded polystyrene in cafeterias. House Bill 2762 would require schools to stop using EPS for trays, plates or other food-service containers or packaging by 2021. The state would be able to provide extensions if a school district can prove meeting the requirement presents a financial hardship, according to the bill.

Parc Corp. has developed and implemented a new technology to recycle multi-layer laminated flexible packaging films. The technology reprocesses the materials and produces pellets for various applications. The Illinois-based company is currently recycling post-industrial materials from an unnamed manufacturer.

Fresh off of a tough playoff loss by its football team, Green Bay, Wisconsin is turning its attention to something else this offseason: recycling items not accepted curbside. In an article imploring residents of Green Bay and the larger Brown County to recycle, the county's recycling head, Mark Walter, suggests dropping plastic bags off at most grocery stores and giving used foam packing peanuts back to shipping stores that pledge to reuse them.


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CVP looks back on 2014

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 22:48
CVP looks back on 2014

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Feb. 10, 2015

The Curbside Value Partnership has released its 2014 annual report, reflecting on a busy year in the organization's history.

In addition to continuing its work with communities aiming to boost recovery and participation rates, CVP in 2014 launched The Recycling Partnership, a public-private recycling venture with national ambitions, and a 14-member Technical Council to "help CVP build better tools, stronger approaches and calculate much-needed data."

Both developments, according to CVP's executive director, Keefe Harrison, are markers of change for a group that started out in 2003 focused solely on container recycling.

"Today we’re working to build not just stronger city solutions, but solutions that strengthen the industry as a whole," Harrison writes in the report.

Launched in May 2014, the CVP's Recycling Partnership has brought in 10 industry funders to help communities finance making a switch from bins to carts. The project, which was developed and passed on to CVP by the Southeast Recycling Development Council, locked in deals with three cities in 2014: Columbia, South Carolina; Richmond, Virginia; and Florence, Alabama.

Other municipalities interested in teaming with the Recycling Partnership have until April 15 to submit proposals.

CVP says it also hopes to do smaller scale work with at least a dozen additional communities in 2015, and later this month it will release a Web-based guide for communities interested in making the bins-to-carts move.

CVP's growth into a more prominent national recycling group is also underlined by its financial blossoming, the report shows. In 2014, CVP more than doubled its budget and cast of funding partners.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: All the hottest topics

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 22:38
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: All the hottest topics

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Feb. 10, 2015

The premier gathering of top recycling executives and program coordinators is set for September in Indianapolis. Start planning now to ensure you are in on the material diversion dialogues that matter.

The Resource Recycling Conference will include sessions on the most relevant topics to recycling professionals right now – dirty MRFs, the fluctuating commodities market, resident outreach tools and much, much more.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis, Indiana. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


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West Coast port dispute slows movement of bales

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 22:35
West coast port dispute slows movement of bales

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Feb. 10, 2015

Contract negotiations between West Coast dock workers and their employers have appeared to hit a boiling point, leaving recycled material in need of export stuck in ports – and potentially bound for landfills.

Since May 2014, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) have been attempting to reach a long-term contract. Those negotiations continued into late October, and at that point ILWU "began to stage devastating slowdowns up and down the coast," PMA alleges. The dispute has caused major delays in overseas cargo shipments, including those carrying recycled materials.

Scott Horne, vice president of government affairs at the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), told Resource Recycling the dispute is hurting recycling-related business that are already battling a tough economic climate.

"With falling commodity prices, recyclers are already having a tough enough time," Horne said. "The ports slowdown is now an additional obstacle to markets that do exist. Scrap is the top export by volume out of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and roughly $9.4 billion in scrap passes out of West Coast ports every year. A complete shutdown would have a crippling effect on the industry and cost American jobs."

Meanwhile, the West Coast Refuse and Recycling Coalition, representing California, Oregon and Washington recycling businesses and waste haulers, sent out a letter to members Jan. 30 urging action and noting the potential negative impacts of a prolonged dispute.

"The continued slowdown at West Coast port terminals is having serious implications upon our industry’s ability to fulfill our contractual obligations designed to achieve maximum recycling and waste diversion goals for the municipalities we serve," the coalition wrote. "Without immediate relief, we may soon be forced to begin redirecting this material to extended storage and disposal, undermining the very goal of our material management operations."

In addition, San Francisco's KTVU News recently reported waste and recycling company Recology is quickly amassing stocks of cardboard and paper awaiting export to Asian paper mills. The California Refuse Recycling Council has also sent a letter to California Gov. Jerry Brown, urging action on the dispute.

Far West Recycling president Keith Ristau told Resource Recycling the Oregon-based company was sitting on 7,200 tons of material "all due to the slowdown."

In the latest development on negotiations, PMA suspended vessel operations over the weekend, stating in a press release that "PMA member companies finally have concluded that they will no longer continue to pay workers premium pay for diminished productivity." Ports were reopened Monday but no agreement between the two sides has been reached.

PMA announced Feb. 4 a new contract offer to ILWU "goes as far as we believe we can go." According to an accompanying video message from PMA president Jim McKenna, the offer raises the annual average salary of full-time ILWU workers to more than $160,000 (from $147,000) and raises the maximum pension to nearly $89,000 (from $80,000). The five-year offer also continues to provide health insurance at no cost to ILWU employees.

“I hope the ILWU leadership will give very serious consideration to this contract offer, which I believe respects their members and gives us a clear path to conclude these talks," McKenna said during a conference call with reporters last week. "We owe it to workers and businesses across the nation to resolve our differences and get our ports moving again.”

ILWU president Robert McEllrath, meanwhile, issued a strongly worded retort to McKenna's characterization that the port could be headed for collapse, and he called on workers to "stay at the negotiating table and work through a few remaining issues," McEllrath said. "We are very close to reaching an agreement."

Craig Merrilees, ILWU's communications director, told Resource Recycling on Friday that "only a few outstanding issues remain" and stated the two parties "are very, very close" to an agreement.

While Merrilees would not divulge specific issues in need of resolution before an agreement can be met, he said they can be "easily resolved." He added, "We just need to get it done."

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Bin grants up for grabs

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 22:29
Bin grants up for grabs

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Feb. 10, 2015

Coca-Cola and Keep America Beautiful are back with the 2015 edition of their annual recycling bin grant program.

With applications now accepted through Feb. 27, the Coca-Cola/Keep America Beautiful Recycling Bin Grant Program is aiming to fund the addition of more than 3,500 bins on college campuses and in public spaces.

"Together with Keep America Beautiful, we are working to increase local recycling rates and to encourage environmental sustainability in communities across the country," Lori George Billingsley, vice president, community relations, Coca-Cola North America, said in a press release.

According to Coca-Cola and KAB, the additional bins could "result in an estimated 1 million pounds of recyclable materials collected during their first year in use."

Founded in 2007, the bins program has provided 542 organizations with more 39,000 recycling bins across the U.S.


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New York leader notes zero waste ambitions

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 22:27
New York leader notes zero waste ambitions

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Feb. 10, 2015

New York City’s sanitation commissioner, Kathryn Garcia, would like to eventually halt sending any of the city’s waste to landfills.

Garcia, who was hired as commissioner of the city's Department of Sanitation in March 2014 by Mayor Bill de Blasio, told Capital New York that she would like to see no materials going to landfill and she looks forward to rolling out programs to achieve that.

She stopped short of articulating any specific new efforts, however.

“My goal is zero waste to landfills,” she told Capital New York. “We look forward to rolling out new programs to achieve this.”

With a current diversion rate of around 15 percent, New York City trails many cities when it comes to recycling. It also lags behind the national recycling rate of 34.5 percent.

New York's former mayor, Michael Bloomberg, helped usher in an era of renewed focus on materials recovery in America's largest city.

In 2013, he announced the addition of all rigid plastics, regardless of resin code, to the city’s curbside recycling program. Later that year, he announced a “Recycle Everything” campaign aimed at boosting the diversion rate and said he’d like to see the rate double to 30 percent by 2017. Also, in conjunction with an ad campaign, Bloomberg announced an expansion of the city’s organics recycling program.

This year, under de Blasio, the City finalized a ban on foam food service packaging on the grounds that it couldn't be recycled. The city is also contemplating a tax on plastic bags to cut down on usage.

“None of this will happen overnight,” Garcia said. “We want to see the curve moving upwards. We know that there’s a lot of work to do.”

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 22:18
NewsBits

Feb. 10, 2015

President Barack Obama's proposed 2016 budget calls for a nearly 6 percent increase in funding to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While questions remain over how much of the president's budget will remain after the Republican-controlled House and Senate get to work on a revised version, the current proposal provides $8.6 billion to the U.S. EPA, a 5.8 percent increase over 2015 funding.

International Paper is in the process of closing recovered paper processing centers in Denver and Memphis. The firm, which handles six million tons of recyclable fiber annually, will continue to operate 18 other paper recycling centers. Approximately two dozen employees will be affected by the plant closures.

Novelis has announced plans to put another $48 million toward an automotive scrap aluminum recycling facility in Oswego, New York. According to Novelis, the new investment brings the company's total investment in the Oswego operation to more than $400 million. The latest investment will cover upgrades at the facility in addition to a new 81,000-square-foot processing site to supply the automotive industry with recycled aluminum parts and material.

Employees at a local recycling plant in Mesa, Arizona unearthed several rounds of explosives in a heap of scrap metal. A bomb squad descended upon the facility, which is owned by publicly traded Commercial Metals Company, and determined just one of the rounds was live. It is unclear who dropped off the explosives at the facility.

New Orleans is bringing glass back. After a decade of sending glass bottles to landfills, the Crescent City is in the process of adding glass back into its curbside recycling program. The transition will take place over an extended period of time and begin in the French Quarter and Central Business District before expanding outward.

The application deadline for the U.S. Composting Council's Sustainable Student Scholarship Award is fast approaching. Applications are due on Feb. 15 and are open to any high school senior "with a keen interest in the compost industry." Click here for more.

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EPA looks to CRT glass landscape

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:32
EPA looks to CRT glass landscape

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has sent out a series of documents on the state of CRT glass processing and possible industry-wide solutions going forward.

The documents, sent to attendees of recent EPA meetings on CRT issues, are aimed at reporting on industry input and "continuing the dialogue" surrounding management of leaded glass, the agency stated in an email.

One of the EPA documents, a diagram covering the CRT landscape, breaks down the various challenges facing the industry. The diagram is based on discussions that took place during a two-day stakeholder meeting hosted by the agency in Arlington, Virginia last September. It is also the most thorough breakdown to date of the recycling and reuse opportunities for CRT glass.

The diagram examines eight potential processes that aim to handle leaded CRT glass. Several of the ideas mentioned – including use of CRT glass in ceramics and concrete products, a retrievable storage scenario, and recovery via copper smelters and chemical extraction – are relatively new entrants into the ongoing industry CRT conversation.

In a separate document that recaps the summit in Arlington, EPA stresses both new and emerging options need to be carefully vetted before use.

"For both new and existing technology it is critical for the electronics community to make strides to improve knowledge of material content and toxicity, enforce existing worker health and safety regulations, and follow best practices to reduce human and environmental exposure to potentially toxic materials," the document reads.

A third document released by EPA last week details the U.S. EPA Meeting on Cathode Ray Tubes, held at the end of the E-Scrap 2014 conference in Orlando, Florida. At that meeting, members of the industry convened with the EPA to review the Arlington meeting and further hash out concerns.

“Enforcement looks like a toothless tiger,” Simon Greer, owner of emerging glass processor Nulife Glass, said at the time. “Make noise about it, please. It will discourage others.”

In its report on the meeting, EPA was careful to note any potential actions would be part of an industry-wide effort, not simply a regulatory one.

"EPA said they hoped to begin working with the electronics recycling community on a strategy that would coordinate multiple actions by the community and help address the current problems with recycling CRTs," the document states.

Barnes Johnson, an EPA deputy director, reiterated that desire in the email sent out to industry members last week.

"EPA cannot address the challenges we face around electronics management alone," Johnson said. "We all have a role and together we can make significant progress."

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Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:28
Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

North America's largest plastics recycling conference will offer some useful knowledge to e-scrap players as well.

Plastics Recycling 2015 will provide an exclusive first look at research on the plastics recovered from scrap electronics. This data-compiling project investigates where e-plastic discards are being generated and where they’re going once they are processed.

A critical analysis of e-plastics consumption, recovery and recycling will be offered, and it will be accompanied by strategies that firms can employ to overcome e-plastic profitability challenges.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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State programs' approach to CRTs unlikely to shift

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:24
State programs' approach to CRTs unlikely to shift

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

During a recent webinar, an expert in e-scrap legislation delved into some trends surrounding state programs and the ways they are dealing with the CRT stream.

Jason Linnell, executive director of the National Center for Electronics Recycling (NCER), a nonprofit organization that assists many state e-scrap programs, noted that of the 25 states that require device manufacturers to pay for the recycling of old electronics, only a handful have ruled CRTs sent to landfills can count toward the manufacturers' recycling targets.

And unless something dramatic happens in the market – for example, a large consuming plant closes – those states aren’t likely to change their minds, Linnell said during the Greeneye Partners EHS Roundtable webinar.

“For the time being, the way the market options are as they stand today, I think the states are probably going to stay with what they have,” Linnell told E-Scrap News in a follow-up interview.

In the U.S., 25 states have some type of electronics recycling program on the books, covering roughly two-thirds of the country’s population. Of those 25 states, 19 responded to an NCER survey asking about their requirements for handling CRT glass, Linnell told webinar participants.

While a total of 14 said they permitted some form of CRT glass landfilling, just three states – Connecticut, Illinois and Vermont – said they would, under certain circumstances, count the practice of turning treated CRT funnel glass into alternative daily cover (ADC) as recycling. Until July 2014, Wisconsin had also counted ADC as recycling under its state program, but it has since changed its stance.

The CRT-to-ADC method has been championed by Illinois-based Kuusakoski US as a solution to the challenging CRT glass market, but has faced an uphill battle in combating the perception that the approach is disposal, not recycling.

Linnell added that some original equipment manufacturers have also opposed the approach due to concerns about the public perception of Kuusakoski's method.

In addition to the landfill discussion, the webinar touched on several other issues.

Connecticut officials established a per-pound rate that e-scrap recycling companies can bill to manufacturers required to pay for recycling. During the webinar, Linnell was asked whether other states are looking at that model, which aims to ensure recyclers are paid enough to carry out processing.

Linnell said he doesn’t envision that approach being replicated elsewhere and told listeners that no other states have seriously considered the approach since 2009. Reluctance, Linnell suggested, has derived from the feeling that state officials might not be able to truly gauge current pricing realities.

The last states to pass laws establishing recycling programs did so nearly five years ago, and, since then, no new statewide laws have been passed. The only two laws enacted were an ordinance in Washington, D.C. passed last year that goes into effect in 2017 and, in 2012, Colorado passed a landfill ban for electronics, but the legislation does not mandate a recycling collection network.

At one point, industry folks were saying that, by 2015, the entire U.S. would be covered by electronics recycling laws, Linnell said on the webinar.  “As we can see, that wasn’t ever really realistic,” he said.

He doesn’t see the number increasing this year either. And, in the short- to medium-term, he doesn’t see Congress passing a national law.  “At the federal level, there hasn’t been a whole lot of activity,” he said.

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Hugo Neu relocates processing site to NJ

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:19
Hugo Neu relocates processing site to NJ

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

To meet growing demand, e-scrap recycling company Hugo Neu Recycling will close its facility in Mount Vernon, New York and open a larger, more advanced one in New Jersey, the company says.

"It certainly will meet the demands of our growing business,” Alan Ratner, the company's president, told E-Scrap News.

Hugo Neu Recycling provides various services for organizations. While Ratner said Hugo Neu's primary business is in collecting and recycling e-scrap, the company also provides data destruction and refurbishment services.

Hugo Neu Recycling’s new facility in the northern New Jersey town of Kearny is estimated to be roughly 40 percent larger than the one being closed, and it will incorporate newer technologies, according to Ratner. The company was awarded a 10-year, $4.5 million Grow New Jersey loan from the state's Economic Development Authority to help finance the relocation.

While the company plans to close its current recycling facility in Mount Vernon, it will retain a separate shredding and downstream recycling facility there. According to Ratner, the company doesn’t know yet whether it will see a net job gain or loss, but all of the employees at the facility slated for closure have been invited to transfer to the new one. Mt. Vernon is about an hour's drive from Kearny.

“Our hopes are that our workforce joins us,” he said.

Hugo Neu Recycling plans to have the Kearny facility operating by the end of April.


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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:16
Certification scorecard

Feb. 5, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Securis of Chantilly, Virginia achieved certification to the R2:2013, ISO 14001 and OSHAS 18001 standards.

American Data Security, Inc. of Oak Park, Michigan; Eco Shred of Lafayette, Indiana; Gilmore Services of Pensacola, Florida; Puliz Records Management of Reno, Nevada; Rapid Shred L.L.C. of Grandville, Michigan; Safeguard Shredding of Alexandria, Virginia; Secure On-Site Shredding of Palm Harbor, Florida; Shred Defense, Inc. of Richmond, California; and Time Shred Services of Freeport, New York have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Lewis Clark Recyclers, Inc. of Lewiston, Idaho; Opportunity Distributing, Inc of Hopkins, Minnesota; and Reclamere, Inc. of Tyron, Pennsylvania have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization Operations and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.


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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:15
NewsBits

Feb. 5, 2015

Despite rumors to the contrary, Missouri-based Doe Run continues to process CRT glass. According to Lou Magdits, the company's director of Raw Materials, Doe Run "consumes CRT glass on a regular basis," and he fully expects the company to do so going forward. "In the past few months we have been adjusting our inventory, which has led to less glass coming into our doors," Magdits told E-Scrap News.

Kentucky has awarded its state e-scrap contract to Global Environmental Services (GES). According to the agreement , executive branches of the state government will be required to send all e-scrap to GES for processing while "all city and county governments and community recycling programs" can use the company as well. The contract also states that GES will only charge for CRT TVs (10 cents per pound) while taking all other e-scrap in bulk for free, including CRT monitors.

An e-scrap recycling event in Syracuse, New York was so successful that police had to shut down a freeway off-ramp because of traffic jams. The collection event at the Syracuse Department of Public Works’ garage yielded eight tractor-trailers full of e-scrap, for an estimated 100 tons. That was four times what was collected last year, before a statewide law went into effect banning the the disposal of electronics at the curb or in the trash.

Electronic Recyclers International (ERI) is taking part in the Person in Port program, a joint initiative launched by The United Nations University, U.S. EPA and the Basel Convention Coordination Centre for Africa. The aim of the program is to track the flow of e-scrap into Nigeria, a major hub of used electronics imports, to identify the condition, quantity and fate of electronics shipped there. ERI has provided educational assistance to bring program leaders up to speed on responsible handling and recycling of end-of-life electronics.

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Industry and supplier news

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:11
Industry and supplier news

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

The Basel Action Network has made available to Android devices its e-Stewards Global Impact Calculator app. The app quantifies for consumers the degree to which using e-Stewards-certified recycling firms can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, prevent toxic metals from being exported or dumped and divert valuable materials from landfill. It is free to download on Google Play and the Apple App Store.

LG Electronics has been named by two research organizations as one of the world’s most sustainable corporations. Corporate Knights awarded LG the top honor in its industry on the 2015 Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporation list. RobecoSAM, meanwhile, honored LG with its top prize in the leisure and consumer electronics category in the 2015 Sustainability Yearbook. For more, click here.

Lenovo and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality have been added to the R2 Leaders program, administered by Sustainable Electronics Recycling International (SERI). Organizations that join the R2 Leaders program pledge to manage their electronics responsibly, consider R2 certification when choosing a recycling company and demonstrate leadership in the field of electronics recycling through projects and policies. For more, click here.

EcoATM has hired the retired chief of the Palm Bay Police Department in Florida as a new member of its law enforcement relations team. The company hired Doug Muldoon to work with the company’s law enforcement partners in the southern U.S. EcoATM makes automated self-service kiosks that buy back old phones, tablets and MP3 players. For more, click here.

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