ResourceRecycling.com RSS Feeds

National refurb conference rebrands

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 22:45
National refurb conference rebrands

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Jan. 22, 2015

North America’s sole computer and electronics refurbishment conference has been given a new name that better reflects its attendees, goals and program.

The International Computer Refurbisher Summit will now be called the Electronics Reuse Conference.

"As the reuse market has grown and expanded over the last decade, refurbishers are now hard at work on a variety of electronic devices, not just computers," according to PC Rebuilders & Recyclers, organizer of the conference.

Founded in 2000, the Chicago-based company takes in old computers and other electronics, refurbishes them and sells them to individuals, nonprofit organizations, schools and other organizations. Parts that can’t be reused by the company are recycled.

This year’s Electronics Reuse Conference will take place Nov. 2-4, 2015 at the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana.


To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

E-Waste Systems finds itself in more hot water

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 22:41
E-Waste Systems finds itself in more hot water

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Jan. 22, 2015

Publicly traded E-Waste Systems has been ruled in default in a lawsuit alleging the firm did not pay workers at its former Ohio processing location.

According to court documents reviewed by E-Scrap News, a total of nine employees have joined the suit, which was originally filed on Nov. 25 and alleges E-Waste Systems (EWSI) failed to pay them "and others similarly situated" for hours worked, including overtime, between Oct. 17 and Nov. 18 of 2014. The employees were then promptly laid off without warning or pay, court documents charge.

Judge Timothy S. Black ruled EWSI "in default" on Jan. 15, giving 21 days for representatives of the former EWSI employees, the national labor rights law firm Barkan Meizlish Handelman Goddin Derose Wentz, to "file a motion for final judgement" in the case. According to Black, EWSI "failed to plead or otherwise defend" itself in the case.

EWSI's CEO Martin Nielson and his lawyer, Gary Blum, did not return a request for comment on the case or the standing of the publicly traded company.

EWSI was evicted from the Springdale, Ohio location in question in December after failing to pay rent in September and October and "refusing to leave the premises" thereafter. At the time, the public relations department for the company stressed EWSI was "committed to make a comeback in the Cincinnati area" in addition to preserving its smaller Geneva, New York operation.

Bob DeRose, the lawyer representing the former employees of EWSI, told E-Scrap News there's reason to believe the company's actions in Ohio "was not an isolated event."

According to DeRose, all past employees, including those related to the company's Geneva and global operations, could also be brought into question by the current legal battle.

"We believe their conduct was company-wide," DeRose said. "We don't know how many people EWSI decided not to pay. [But] our lawsuit was worded in such a fashion that it would pick up any employees subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act, in whatever location, in whatever subsidiary, that fell under its umbrella."

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), according to the website of the Department of Labor, "establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and youth employment standards affecting employees in the private sector and in Federal, State and local governments."

Founded in 2011, EWSI made a name for itself by announcing a slew of international mergers and acquisitions between 2012 and 2014, many of which were promoted as moves that would substantially boost revenues. Consequent financial filings, however, indicated those actions did little, if anything, to overcome continued annual operational losses and declining stock share price. The firm announced a reverse stock split late in 2014 to raise financing for future expansions and growth.

The annual salary of EWSI's Nielson, SEC filings show, is listed at $372,696. One other member of the executive management team, treasurer and vice president Susan Johnson, is listed with an annual salary. Hers was $86,000.

Johnson did not return a request for comment.

The company's online list of key employees includes 15 additional "senior management" officers and advisors.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Recycling interests play small role in campaign funding

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 22:34
Recycling interests play small role in campaign funding

by Jerry Powell, E-Scrap News

Jan. 22, 2015

Recently elected Congressional members raised hundreds of millions of dollars from individuals and political action committees in the lead-up to voting last November. An analysis of campaign spending records indicates, however, that the recycling industry remains a relatively small player in campaign financing.

To take two examples touching the recycling industry, the political action committee managed by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries contributed $52,500 during this period to more than two dozen federal candidates from both parties and six other campaign committees. The Waste Management employee PAC contributed almost $55,000 to 32 federal candidates and over $37,000 to seven other campaign committees. Compared to the previous election cycle, when ISRI donated over $64,000 to candidates and the WM PAC contributed over $112,000.

As another example, Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL) was re-elected and will remain the chairman of a key environment subcommittee where waste management and recycling issues may be debated. He raised $1.97 million for his re-election campaign.

Two percent of these monies came from groups and companies with an interest in recycling, such as the ISRI PAC, Waste Management and the Automotive Recyclers Association. Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY) is the ranking Democrat on this subcommittee and he raised no funds from recycling interests.

A total of $1.54 billion was spent in 2014 Congressional races. Over $1.7 billion was spent in the previous election cycle.


To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

E-Scrap 2015: Your Labor Day is safe

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 22:30
E-Scrap 2015: Your Labor Day is safe

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Jan. 22, 2015

E-Scrap 2015 is scheduled to take place earlier than in years past – Sept. 1-3, 2015. But fear not, beach goers and grill masters: You won't have to decide between maintaining Labor Day weekend traditions and attending the best networking event in electronics recycling.

In 2015, Labor Day is Sept. 7, the week after E-Scrap 2015. That means you can get to the conference, be home in time to share all you learned with colleagues and then have your usual Labor Day fun.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for the latest on attending, sponsoring and exhibiting.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Patent watch

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 22:26
Patent watch

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Jan. 22, 2015

Tokyo-based JX Nippon Mining & Metals Corporation was given Patent No. 8,911,533 for a method of recovering precious metals from scrap electronics.

Ricoh Company, Ltd., also of Tokyo, was awarded Patent No. 8,929,780 for a method of recycling toner-containing printer and copier cartridges.

Patent Application No. 20140311294, which describes a method of recovering rare earth elements, was given to The University of Houston System in Texas.

Fuel cell recycling is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140326809 given to Dresden, Germany's Adensis GmbH.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.


To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 22:12
Certification scorecard

Jan. 22, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Asset Management & Disposal d/b/a RetirePC of Richardson, Texas achieved certification to the following standards: ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013.

Legal Shred Inc. of Gibsonton, Florida and The Paper Predator by DDC of Kentucky of Shelbyville, Kentucky have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, email dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/21/2015 - 21:44
NewsBits

Jan. 22, 2015

Intel, the big computer chip producer, says PC prices may decline slightly in 2015. This will put continued competitive pressure on e-scrap processors that resell old PCs. With fast and capable laptops currently selling for under $200 each, resellers already confront tight margins, especially for those units requiring refurbishment. Brian Krzanich, Intel’s CEO, now says PC prices may dip a bit more in the coming months. One reason for the possible decline is that the average price of Intel chips fell three percent in the last quarter of 2014.

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, National Football League and Verizon kicked off festivities early this year by hosting the second annual E-Waste Recycling Rally in Phoenix, Arizona. The event, which took place Jan. 20 and ran for the most of the day, allowed residents to bring in a wide range of electronics for free, including televisions, laptops and cellphones.

Good for the environment? Yes. But e-scrap recycling is also good for national security, according to this piece at Forbes.com. Electronics shipped overseas can later end up as counterfeit new parts in the U.S. defense supply chain, potentially compromising military equipment’s safety or reliability.

The global e-waste management market may experience a compound annual growth rate of nearly 24 percent through 2020, according to a new report by Allied Market Research. The report says the market may reach $49.4 billion by 2020. About 57.7 million tons of e-scrap were generated in 2013, according to the study.

Two bills that aim to increase e-scrap recycling have been introduced in the Texas Legislature: One requiring large retailers to accept electronics for recycling and another to make it illegal to throw e-scrap in the garbage. Both failed to advance through the legislature last session. Texas already has an extended producer responsibility program for some end-of-life electronics.

The Australian City of Port Augusta is investigating a series of e-scrap dumping grounds located throughout the coastal locale. All told, investigators have narrowed in on 20 sites where numerous electronics have been discarded illegally, and members of Port Augusta's City Council are examining ways to cut down on the practice and encourage recycling instead.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

FPI announces foam recycling equipment grants

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:47
FPI announces foam recycling equipment grants

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 21, 2015

A new grant program will help U.S. and Canadian organizations purchase the equipment needed to process and prepare expanded polystyrene for recycling.

The Foam Recycling Coalition has launched the new grant program, which will pay for equipment needed to process post-consumer expanded polystyrene (EPS) food service packaging, egg cartons, meat trays and protective packaging used for shipping fragile items.

Formed in 2014, the Foam Recycling Coalition is part of the Foodservice Packaging Institute (FPI).

"The Foam Recycling Coalition was put together to help educate people on how to recycle foam and the steps that they need to take, but also you have the grant program that’s part of that equation," FPI President Lynn Dyer said in an interview with Plastics Recycling Update.

Grant amounts will range from an estimated $15,000 to $50,000, but will be determined on a case-by-case basis. No cash match is required as part of the program, but grant recipients may incur related costs, such as site preparation, conveying systems, electrical infrastructure, freight transportation or others, according to the FPI website. Grant award winners must also commit to collecting, processing and marketing EPS for a minimum of three years.

The issue of recycling post-consumer foam has come to a head after New York City opted to ban the material instead of attempting an ambitious recycling plan proposed by foam manufacturer Dart Container.

Dyer says the grant program is a real opportunity to help “dispel myths like we’re seeing out of New York City that you can’t recycle it and there are no end markets."

To that end, grant money could pay for a densifier specifically tailored to compact the loose material into blocks for more efficient transportation and recycling. With price tags ranging from $18,000 a piece to more high-powered $50,000 models, densifiers are expensive but crucial: A truckload of baled EPS weighs 16,000 pounds, while a load of compacted foam can weigh up to 40,000 pounds.

"There’s no question that there’s a market for the material; however, what is potentially missing is the equipment that a MRF might need, for example, to make it economical," Dyer said.

Without densifying the material, transportation "can get very expensive, because you’re shipping air," Dyer said.

Both public and private sectors in the U.S. and Canada are eligible to apply for the grants. The organizations must be involved in managing residential curbside or drop-off programs, managing commercial recycling efforts or operating a MRF. Grants can be awarded to organizations that want to start an EPS recycling program or that want to augment an already-existing one.

The grants aren’t necessarily limited to purchasing equipment, Dyer said, and FPI will entertain other proposals that assist in EPS recycling.

Grant applications are due by March 16, 2015 and FPI hopes to offer the grants on an annual basis.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Plastics Recycling 2015: Just 10 days left for discounted hotel rate

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:42
Plastics Recycling 2015: Just 10 days left for discounted hotel rate

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 21, 2015

To get the most out of the upcoming Plastics Recycling Conference, be sure to stay at the host hotel, the Hyatt Regency Dallas at Reunion. All of the conference events will be taking place at the Hyatt Regency, so by booking your room there, you'll ensure your place at the center of the networking and deal-making action.

Up until Jan. 30, attendees can book a room at the Hyatt at a discounted rate of $198, plus taxes. However, once that date passes – or the conference room block sells out – room prices will increase. Act now and book your hotel room here!

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Curbside foam collection a reality in some cities

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:37
Curbside foam collection a reality in some cities

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 21, 2015

New York City's recent decision to ban foam food service products due to curbside recycling obstacles has raised another question: What are other municipalities doing with the material?

According to an online database compiled by foam manufacturer Dart Container, more than 60 communities in California, including Los Angeles and Sacramento, include post-consumer expanded polystyrene (EPS) in their curbside programs. San Antonio also allows the material in curbside bins.

A 2013 study funded by the American Chemistry Council and conducted by Moore Recycling Associates suggested 31 percent of the American population in 2012 had access to foam recycling either curbside or via drop-off locations.

In cementing their decision on EPS, New York City officials said their research showed integrating the material into the curbside infrastructure would be costly and time consuming, and they noted question marks remain when it comes to downstream markets for post-consumer foam.

But Moore Recycling's CEO, Patty Moore, says not all communities are reaching that same conclusion.

"The research we’ve done shows that EPS can, and is, being recycled in curbside programs," Moore said. "California is a leader in collecting this material curbside."

Recycling foam via drop-off locations, meanwhile, is far more widespread in the U.S., Dart's list shows. Municipalities in 17 states have at least one drop-off location for the material.

In addition to New York City, several other large cities have moved to ban post-consumer EPS, including Portland, Oregon, Washington D.C. and Seattle.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Recycling interests play small role in campaign funding

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:33
Recycling interests play small role in campaign funding

by Jerry Powell, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 21, 2015

Recently elected Congressional members raised hundreds of millions of dollars from individuals and political action committees in the lead-up to voting last November. An analysis of campaign spending records indicates, however, that the recycling industry remains a relatively small player in campaign financing.

To take two examples touching the recycling industry, the political action committee managed by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries contributed $52,500 during this period to more than two dozen federal candidates from both parties and six other campaign committees. The Waste Management employee PAC contributed almost $55,000 to 32 federal candidates and over $37,000 to seven other campaign committees. Compared to the previous election cycle, when ISRI donated over $64,000 to candidates and the WM PAC contributed over $112,000.

As another example, Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL) was re-elected and will remain the chairman of a key environment subcommittee where waste management and recycling issues may be debated. He raised $1.97 million for his re-election campaign.

Two percent of these monies came from groups and companies with an interest in recycling, such as the ISRI PAC, Waste Management and the Automotive Recyclers Association. Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY) is the ranking Democrat on this subcommittee and he raised no funds from recycling interests.

A total of $1.54 billion was spent in 2014 Congressional races. Over $1.7 billion was spent in the previous election cycle.


To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

PetroChem Wire: Recycled polypropylene pellet price weakens in new year

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:30
PetroChem Wire: Recycled polypropylene pellet price weakens in new year

Jan. 21, 2015

FDA-sanctioned post-consumer CoPP black recycled pellet material was reported sold last week at over 60 cpp delivered U.S. locations East of the Rocky Mountains. CoPP post-consumer black pellets without any FDA approval saw buying interest closer to 50 cpp FOB US East Coast, down a penny from the previous week. HoPP back repro moved lower too in tandem with CoPP, with that market pegged at 48-49 cpp FOB East Coast as offers at 50 cpp FOB attracted little buying interest.

In the prime polypropylene, HoPP dropped 6 cpp to 64 cpp the second week in January, following a decline of 4 cpp the previous week.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Scrap export figures rise again after hiccup

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:25
Scrap export figures rise again after hiccup

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 21, 2015

Exports of scrap plastics in October 2014 continued their overall rebound from year-previous shipping levels.

Exports bounced back in October, the most recent month for which data is available, after a month-to-month dip at the outset of the third quarter.

October saw a steep 14.3 percent month-to-month increase from September 2014 export levels, with 461.1 million pounds of scrap plastics exported during the 10th month of the year. When matched against October 2013 levels (403.4 million pounds), the volume of plastic scrap exports was up by a robust 16.6 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in October, at 19.77 cents per pound, was down from September 2014 levels by 5.2 percent. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 9.5 percent.

Year-to-date (YTD) figures for scrap plastics showed strong gains as well. With 4.03 billion pounds exported through October 2014, the volume of recovered plastics sent across U.S. borders was up 16.7 percent from its YTD 2013 figure, which was heavily influenced by China's Operation Green Fence.

At 19.88 cents per pound, however, the average price for the first 10 months of 2014 was down by 3.2 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

Plastics Recycling 2015: The real impact of mixed-waste MRFs on plastics recovery

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:22
Plastics Recycling 2015: The real impact of mixed-waste MRFs on plastics recovery

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 21, 2015

The resurgence of mixed-waste processing facilities, often known as "dirty" MRFs, has sparked a lively debate in recycling. Several major U.S. municipalities have recently given the green light to sizable MRF projects that will aim to separate recyclables from organics and other materials in the residential waste stream.

That raises a core question for plastics recycling stakeholders: What effect will these types of facilities will have on plastics recovery? At Plastics Recycling 2015, attendees will get the first-hand perspective from various stakeholders involved with both the building of a mixed-waste MRF and the consumers of recyclable materials from that type of facility.

Look to the stage in Dallas for a well-balanced look at dirty MRF technology, inputs, output, quality, economics, future projections and more.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

 

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

 

NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/20/2015 - 22:14
NewsBits

Jan. 21, 2015

A researcher working out of a small, collegiate lab in Hong Kong says he's making progress in "cracking" the recycling of mixed plastics. Stephen Chow, a professor at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, has been working on breaking down a variety of mixed plastics in just 10 minutes, two to six times quicker than traditional approaches.

A new program in the Central African country of Cameroon plans to recycle 11,000 tons of plastic per year, about 1.7 percent of the plastics disposed of each year. The program, called Eco Collect, will begin in the capital city of Yaounde and the country’s largest city, Douala, before expanding to other areas of the country.

An article posted on Ars Technica takes readers on a virtual tour of Sims Municipal Recycling's Sunset Park MRF in Brooklyn. The feature examines some of the plant's most advanced sorting equipment and even includes a photograph showing the current pricing for PET (15.5 cents per pound) and HDPE (26 cents per pound). The facility sorts all of the recyclables collected through New York City's curbside recycling program.

A system has been devised in Mexico to recycle PET into a paper-like product at a lower cost than traditional methods. Young entrepreneurs at the company Cronology have managed to recycle PET bottles into mineral paper, which can be used to print books, boxes and stationery.

A new technology employed at a U.K. recycling plant uses microwaves to separate materials in plastic-aluminum laminates so they can be recycled. A commercial-scale plant in Luton, U.K. is now in operation and can recycle up to 2,204 tons of packaging annually. Plastic-aluminum laminates, a food and drinking packaging growing in popularity, are otherwise not recyclable. The plant is partly funded by Nestle and Kraft Foods/Mondelez International.

Scientists in Mexico City have found a creative way of degrading used diapers so the plastics in them can be recycled. Scientists at the Metropolitan Autonomous University determined they can grow mushrooms in the used diapers. The mushrooms degrade the wood-derived cells, leaving plastics that can be recycled, other materials that can be composted and high-protein mushroom that can be consumed.

To return to the Plastics Recycling Update newsletter, click here

Curbside foam collection a reality in some cities

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/19/2015 - 22:52
Curbside foam collection a reality in some cities

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 20, 2015

New York City's recent decision to ban foam food service products due to curbside recycling obstacles has raised another question: What are other municipalities doing with the material?

According to an online database compiled by foam manufacturer Dart Container, more than 60 communities in California, including Los Angeles and Sacramento, include post-consumer expanded polystyrene (EPS) in their curbside programs. San Antonio also allows the material in curbside bins.

A 2013 study funded by the American Chemistry Council and conducted by Moore Recycling Associates suggested 31 percent of the American population in 2012 had access to foam recycling either curbside or via drop-off locations.

In cementing their decision on EPS, New York City officials said their research showed integrating the material into the curbside infrastructure would be costly and time consuming, and they noted question marks remain when it comes to downstream markets for post-consumer foam.

But Moore Recycling's CEO, Patty Moore, says not all communities are reaching that same conclusion.

"The research we’ve done shows that EPS can, and is, being recycled in curbside programs," Moore said. "California is a leader in collecting this material curbside."

Recycling foam via drop-off locations, meanwhile, is far more widespread in the U.S., Dart's list shows. Municipalities in 17 states have at least one drop-off location for the material.

In addition to New York City, several other large cities have moved to ban post-consumer EPS, including Portland, Oregon, Washington, D.C. and Seattle.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Scrap plastic exports rebound while ferrous declines again

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/19/2015 - 22:45
Scrap plastic exports rebound while ferrous declines again

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 20, 2015

What's the story with scrap materials exports in a nutshell? Plastics up, paper flat, aluminum down and ferrous way down. Read on for more.

Scrap plastics exports bounced back in October, the most recent month for which data is available, after a month-to-month dip at the outset of the third quarter.

October saw a steep 14.3 percent month-to-month increase from September 2014 export levels, with 461.1 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in October. When matched against October 2013 levels (403.4 million pounds), the volume of plastic scrap exports was up by a robust 16.6 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in October, at 19.77 cents per pound, was down from September 2014 levels by 5.2 percent. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 9.5 percent.

Scrap plastics also showed strong gains in year-to-date (YTD) figures. With 4.03 billion pounds exported through October 2014, the volume of recovered plastics sent across U.S. borders was up 16.7 percent from its YTD 2013 figure, which was heavily influenced by China's Operation Green Fence. At 19.88 cents per pound, however, the average price for the first 10 months of 2014 was down by 3.2 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

As for other exported materials, recovered paper exports continued to see a small improvement through October 2014, with 15.89 million metric tons exported, a 1.4 percent increase from levels through October 2013. At $165 per metric ton, the weighted average price of exported recovered paper through October was relatively flat, down just 0.6 percent when compared with its standing through the first 10 months of 2014.

Ferrous scrap exports continued to show strong declines YOY, with 12.92 million metric tons exported through October 2014, amounting to a sharp 17.6 percent decrease from levels through the first 10 months of 2013. At $408 per metric ton, the weighted average price of exported ferrous scrap fell 0.6 percent from ferrous scrap exports figures through October 2013.

Lastly, the 3.19 billion pounds of aluminum scrap exported through October 2014 equated to a 6.7 percent decrease from the first 10 months of 2013. At 77 cents per pound, the average price of exported aluminum scrap through October 2014 was also down by 4.1 percent YOY.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Access to food scrap collection grows 8 percent

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/19/2015 - 22:42
Access to food scrap collection grows 8 percent

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 20, 2015

Original research from a national composting magazine suggests nearly 200 municipalities throughout the country are offering residential food scrap collection.

Up more than 8 percent from BioCycle's 2012 count of 183, the 2014 tally of 198 municipalities points to a growing interest in diverting food scraps at a time when America manages to divert less than 5 percent of its food waste.

According to the U.S. EPA's 2012 MSW study, food scraps represent almost 15 percent of America's MSW stream, but just 4.7 percent of it is composted. A total of 1.74 million pounds of food scraps were composted in 2012, while more than 34 million pounds were landfilled.

Finding a way to divert more food scraps, composting advocates say, is key to driving America's stagnating diversion rate.

According to BioCycle, the number of municipalities including food scraps either with yard debris or in separate carts and bins has grown eight fold in the past decade. In 2005, just 24 municipalities offered food scrap diversion programs.

By region, food scrap collection continues to be dominated by cities and communities in the Western U.S. Of the approximately 2.74 million U.S. households with some form of residential service, almost half (1.33 million households) are situated in California. Food scrap collection is also offered to many residents in Washington and Oregon.

Of non-Western states, Texas, New York and Ohio have managed to move the needle in terms of households, combining to serve more than 200,000, the BioCycle numbers show.

BioCycle is billed as the official magazine of the U.S. Composting Council, which is hosting its Compost2015 conference and trade show this week in Austin, Texas

Correction: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated residential programs grew 9 percent between 2012 and 2014.  Programs grew 8 percent.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Recycling interests play small role in campaign funding

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/19/2015 - 22:35
Recycling interests play small role in campaign funding

by Jerry Powell, Resource Recycling

Jan. 20, 2015

Recently elected Congressional members raised hundreds of millions of dollars from individuals and political action committees in the lead-up to voting last November. An analysis of campaign spending records indicates, however, that the recycling industry remains a relatively small player in campaign financing.

To take two examples touching the recycling industry, the political action committee managed by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries contributed $52,500 during this period to more than two dozen federal candidates from both parties and six other campaign committees. The Waste Management employee PAC contributed almost $55,000 to 32 federal candidates and over $37,000 to seven other campaign committees. Compared to the previous election cycle, when ISRI donated over $64,000 to candidates and the WM PAC contributed over $112,000.

As another example, Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL) was re-elected and will remain the chairman of a key environment subcommittee where waste management and recycling issues may be debated. He raised $1.97 million for his re-election campaign.  Just 2 percent of these monies came from groups and companies with an interest in recycling, such as the ISRI PAC, Waste Management and the Automotive Recyclers Association.  Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY) is the ranking Democrat on this subcommittee and he raised no funds from recycling interests.

A total of $1.54 billion was spent in 2014 Congressional races. Over $1.7 billion was spent in the previous election cycle.

To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

 

Wide world of recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/19/2015 - 22:30
Wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 20, 2015

Small trash receptacles have equated to big jumps in recycling in Scotland's capital. Grab the details in our global look at the industry.

By reducing the size of garbage cans, officials in Edinburgh, Scotland have increased the recycling rate to 85 percent, according to the Edinburgh Evening News. A pilot project deployed half-size garbage cans at 140,000 households, and plans are in place to expand the effort throughout Scotland's capital city. Households within the test area recycled 7.7 pounds per week, compared to the citywide average of 4.4 pounds.

A researcher working out of a small, collegiate lab in Hong Kong says he's making progress in "cracking" the recycling of mixed plastics. Stephen Chow, a professor at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, has been working on breaking down a variety of mixed plastics in just 10 minutes, two to six times quicker than traditional approaches.

While the European Commission (EC) has announced it will table and replace its Circular Economy program in the near future, a majority of members of the European Parliament have said they oppose the plan. They were, however, unable to reach an accord to formally oppose the step in a Jan. 15 vote, meaning the EC will likely be able to continue as planned.


To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

.

.