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Scrap plastics exports continue to see gains

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 20:48
Scrap plastics exports continue to see gains

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 24, 2014

Exports of recovered plastics saw healthy rises during May, the most recent month for which data is available.

May scrap plastics exports saw a rise of 7.0 percent from April 2014 export levels, with 425.11 million pounds exported in May 2014. When matched against May 2013 levels — when China's Operation Green Fence was just past its April peak — the volume of plastic scrap exports was also up, by 27.2 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in May, at 19.78 cents per pound, was down by 2.8 percent from its April 2014 standing of 20.36. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 6.6 percent.

Through May, at 1.92 billion pounds, the volume of recovered plastics exported was up 12.7 percent from its 2013 year-to-date (YTD) figure. At 19.73 cents per pound, however, the average price through May was down 3.2 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

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PetroChem Wire: Prime HDPE selling at discount to recycled

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 20:46
PetroChem Wire: Prime HDPE selling at discount to recycled

July 24, 2014

Recycled HDPE frac melt natural pellets held firm for the week ended July 18 at 80 to 84 cents per pound.

That was 5 to 6 cents per pound higher than wide-spec natural prime HDPE, which rose 2 cents per pound in the same time frame to 76 to 77 cents per pound FOB Midwest due to two plant force majeures. Tight HDPE natural scrap bale supply has driven natural repro prices to current high levels and resulted in its current, unusual relationship to prime material.

HDPE post-consumer frac-melt natural dairy regrind was up a penny during the week ended July 18 to 60 to 62 cents per pound on firm natural repro prices.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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San Antonio prepares for curbside collection of plastic bags

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 20:43
San Antonio prepares for curbside collection of plastic bags

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

July 24, 2014

San Antonio, Texas is just nine days away from making an unconventional move: accepting single-use plastic bags in a curbside recycling program.

The city, which boasts a population of nearly 1.4 million people, included the service in a recent 10-year pact signed with ReCommunity Recycling last year. ReCommunity takes over San Antonio's curbside collection program Aug. 1 and plastic bags — as long as they're clean and packed together inside another bag — will be permitted in recycling bins.

"The plastic bag program that we are implementing in San Antonio is specifically designed to meet the City’s expressed desire to find a solution to recovering plastic bags as well as our overarching business strategy to always seek to recover more commodities from the recycling stream," said Will Herzog, ReCommunity's western region business development manager. "In partnership with the City of San Antonio, we believe this program can be a successful tool to increase recovery rates and decrease disposal volumes."

The "Bag Your Bags" program, Herzog noted, still stresses reuse among city residents and even cedes that the "most effective way" to recycle bags is to drop them off through grocery store take-back programs. But if residents opt to recycle them curbside, ReCommunity is prepared to collect and process them.

"As everyone knows, plastic bags are recyclable as long as they can be effectively recovered from the recycling stream," Herzog said.

Patty Moore of Moore Recycling Associates said a recent study indicates quite a few U.S. cities are collecting film, but she stressed curbside is not the preferred method for collecting bags. "Based on the [Plastic Film and Bag Recycling Collection National Reach] study completed in 2012, there are over 300 cities collecting film curbside," Moore said. "There are growing opportunities to collect film at more than 17,000 drop-off locations nationwide, which are mostly retail."

At the time of the contract negotiations between San Antonio and ReCommunity, a plastic bag ban ordinance was also being discussed as a means to cut down on plastic litter in the sprawling municipality. The emergence of the "Bag Your Bags" program appears to have quelled that debate, at least for now.

In the midst of the bag ban debate last summer, a City Council member estimated San Antonio was spending around $1.3 million to collect bags and minimize bag-related litter.

City representatives did not return a request for comment on the bag program.

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Advocates continue push to halt Indianapolis MRF

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 20:38
Advocates continue push to halt Indianapolis MRF

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 24, 2014

Though the Indianapolis mayor's office has indicated a deal is done to bring a mixed-waste MRF to the city, opponents of the plan say the facility can still be stopped and that support for their cause is growing.

The office of the city's mayor, Greg Ballard, announced last month it had reached a deal with Covanta to construct a $45 million center to sort recyclables, including a wide range of plastics, from mixed solid waste. Such facilities are sometimes called "dirty MRFs" and they allow for collection systems in which residents throw trash and recyclables in one curbside receptacle.

However, the Indiana Recycling Coalition (IRC) and a member of the Indianapolis' city council say there's still time to stop the plan, which they argue was finalized without a full public vetting process and without considering other options for boosting recycling activity in the city of 820,000.

"The messaging on the Covanta deal from the mayor's office is, 'Don't worry we've got this done,'" said John Barth, an at-large member of the Indianapolis-Marion County City-County Council. "That's not a good sustainable approach for the future of the city, to just go ahead and say, 'Throw everything away.'"

Barth, who chairs the council's community affairs committee, put the recycling issue on the agenda for the committee's July 22 meeting, offering residents and industry members an opportunity to voice concerns and discuss alternative proposals. Neither the committee nor city council has the authority to block the Covanta deal, but the hope is to generate enough outcry to grab the attention of the city's board of public works, the entity that must approve the project by vote if it is to move forward.

"What I'm hoping to do is create a forum where the public can really understand what we're doing here is making a generational decision without having significant public input," Barth said.

The public works board, which includes a number of members who were appointed by the mayor, has not scheduled a vote on the issue, but will also a hold a meeting this week to discuss the proposal and hear from community members and recycling advocates on both sides of the debate.

Consequently, the IRC has initiated a campaign to encourage residents and industry to reach out to the board with concerns. "The board of public works is allowing public testimony, which is not something they normally do," said Carey Hamilton, IRC's executive director. "It's a sign that people are being heard."

The Indianapolis mayor's office has argued the mixed-waste MRF is the best approach for a city that has experimented with different curbside offerings in the past but failed to see significant participation. Currently, Indianapolis residents can subscribe for curbside recyclables collection through individual haulers. "The Covanta proposal requires no funding from the government, no increased rates for taxpayers, and no government mandates being issued on the actions of the general public," said Marc Lotter, a spokesperson from the mayor's office.

If Covanta does get the green light, it will build its $45 million facility next door to its current waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the Indianapolis area. The two operations would work in tandem, the company recently told Plastics Recycling Update, with unrecyclable materials headed to the WTE operation for conversion into energy.

A recent study from the American Chemistry Council pointed to plastics as a material primed for WTE processing in the event that it cannot be recycled. The U.S. EPA says the nation recycled just 8.8 percent of plastics generated in 2012.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 20:30
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

July 24, 2014

Can a single-use shopping bag act as a window to your soul? An artist in Korea offers up some plastic-based psychology. That story and other, slightly less avant garde updates are in our global wrap-up.

A Korean artist has one-upped Andy Warhol — at least as far as sustainability goes — by making Rorschach tests out of discarded plastic bags. Artist Kyung-Woo Han is modernizing Warhol's famous inkblot series by using plastic bags instead of paint. Perhaps the work aims to demonstrate there's more to trash than meets the eye?

Between now and 2019, the European market for biodegradable plastics is expected to grow by 12 percent, new research suggests. In addition to increasing consumer interest in alternatives to traditional plastic packaging, 2020 EU goals to cut the region's reliance on single-use plastic are expected to add to the rise in the biodegradable market.

German research firm Ceresana says the global market for plastic containers will keep on growing for at least the next several years. While many circumstances could get in the way of the such projections, the global market is expected to rise to nearly 50.1 million tons by 2021, with PET and PP containers in particular gaining steam.

Running counter to the idea that consumers are cutting down on plastic bag usage, the latest numbers out of the U.K. suggest bag use is up. According to waste prevention group WRAP, 8.3 billion plastic single-use bags were used in 2013, an increase of 3.2 percent since 2012, when 8.1 billion bags were used. While overall virgin polymer use is down 48 percent since 2006, 2013 also saw 5 percent more virgin resins used to make bags than in 2012.


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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 20:25
NewsBits

July 24, 2014

Approximately 53,780 plastic bottles are thrown out by New York City residents every hour. To make that knowledge more known, a design studio based in New York, Studio KCA, has erected a cloud-like sculpture using nearly 54,000 discarded bottles. The project is called "Heads in the Clouds" and after a brief stint at New York's Governors Island, the floating and rather graceful sculpture is looking for its next landing spot.

Denmark-based beer maker Carlsberg — the "European Budweiser," according to some &mdash is launching a new "upcycling" venture to capture and recycle more of its packaging. The endeavor will see Carlsberg collaborating with suppliers to achieve better diversion results for a host of materials, including plastic shrink wrap and PET-containing kegs.

Over at The Guardian, reporter Amy Wu discusses several "sustainable packaging mistakes" made by major companies throughout the world. Among the plastic-oriented snafus cited by Wu are toothpaste tubes and toothbrushes, which are "almost impossible" to recycle in many markets due to a host of complications.


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Arkansas offers $200,000 for e-scrap efforts

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 12:10
Arkansas offers $200,000 for e-scrap efforts

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

July 24, 2014

For the ninth year in a row Arkansas is issuing grant funding to help keep scrap electronics out of landfills.

The state's 2014 E-Waste Grants will be awarded to project developers aiming to create jobs and mitigate improper disposal in the state, which does not have an e-scrap law in place.

The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) will be accepting applications for grants until Sept. 1 and make decisions on dispersing about $200,000 in funds on or before December 31, a press release states.

The grant program was created "to assist in the development of sustained processes for recovery, recycling, and demanufacturing of scrap computers and electronics" and is funded through the sale of state-owned computers, the website states.

Katherine Benenati, who serves as the DEQ's public outreach and assistant division chief, told E-Scrap News the grants "help provide more recycling opportunities across the state and keep e-waste out of landfills, particularly in rural areas where opportunities may not have existed before."

Benenati also noted the state offers a separate series of annual grants to regional solid waste management districts and local governments looking to properly and sustainably handle computers and other used electronics.

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E-Scrap 2014: EPA’s role in the CRT issue

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 11:35
E-Scrap 2014: EPA’s role in the CRT issue

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

July 24, 2014

The industry has heard plenty from individual firms that have been squeezed by the ongoing cost struggles when it comes to processing old TVs and computer monitors. At this fall's E-Scrap 2014, attendees will get the unique opportunity to hear a federal regulator's take on the topic.

Amanda Kohler, a specialist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will take to the stage to discuss her agency's response to the growing concerns surrounding CRT recycling. The presentation will review the details — and limits &mdash of the agency’s ability to address the problem, touching on EPA’s actions to date and possible future policy.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to secure your spot at this fall's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.

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Federal study shows safety lapses in e-scrap processing

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 11:33
Federal study shows safety lapses in e-scrap processing

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

July 24, 2014

A just-released federal report sheds light on the numerous occupational health and safety dangers that likely exist at e-scrap firms throughout the country.

The report, released this month by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), shares findings from a series of site visits conducted between 2012 and 2013 at the request of an undisclosed e-scrap firm in the U.S. NIOSH collected air, surface and blood samples and interviewed about a quarter of facility employees to identify necessary health and safety improvements.

And, according to the report, a variety of shortcomings were found. Seven of 26 interviewed employees reported health concerns connected to CRT de-manufacturing, and NIOSH staffers found reason for worry on lead exposure.

Two company employees engaged in "maintenance or in the CRT processing area" had elevated blood lead levels and one employee was found to be overexposed to lead in the air. In addition, lead was detected on the clothing and skin of employees as well as on surface areas throughout the facility. Lead, a potentially toxic substance, is concentrated in the funnel glass and frit components of CRT monitors and displays.

Noise and ergonomic assessments were also carried out during NIOSH's visits — both areas, the report states, could stand to improve. Seven of 13 employees were exposed to noise levels above national workplace standards and employees were observed working in "awkward," strenuous and potentially dangerous positions.

A 13-point list of recommendations was drawn up to respond to NIOSH's concerns, including updating the ventilation system, segregating CRT glass breaking areas and a remodeling of facility work stations and procedures to ensure worker safety.

The NIOSH agency, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is responsible for conducting research and making recommendations on national worker safety issues.

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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 11:30
Certification scorecard

July 24, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Oscar Winkski eRecycling of Lafayette, Indiana is now certified to the RIOS and R2:2013 standards.

Li Tong Group of Fo Tan, Hong Kong has achieved NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 11:22
NewsBits

July 24, 2014

Goodwill Industries of Southwestern Pennsylvania has already met its state-mandated 2014 e-scrap recycling target, meaning the organization will no longer accept old CRT televisions at its 30 stores. Once state targets are met, groups and businesses no longer receive funds to put toward the recycling and Goodwill says it simply cannot afford to pay for the recycling of CRT devices on its own.

The owner of West Virginia Recycling Services in the city of Charleston has decided to no longer accept e-scrap from the community, citing overwhelming amounts of expensive-to-recycle televisions and computers. "I’m done with e-waste," owner George Hunyadi told a local newspaper. "It’s just been a big pain in the butt." Residents will still have at least two recycling options for their end of life electronics: the city of Charleston and a nearby Best Buy drop-off site.

An Illinois musician has created a guitar/synthesizer-like instrument out of recovered hard drives and other computer components. "Instruments are this free-form art; they just have to make sound," the innovator, Colten Jackson, told Wired. "Whatever you start with, whether it’s garbage or e-waste, it lends itself to something."

A Chinese firm that offers payments for used mobile devices with resale value has nabbed $8 million in funding from investors including the International Finance Corporation. The startup company, called Aihuishou, uses a digital platform to connect with consumers.

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AF&PA says paper recovery down in 2013, on track for 2020

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:13
AF&PA says paper recovery down in 2013, on track for 2020

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 23, 2014

The latest paper recovery data for 2013 suggests activity was down for the second straight year, but paper recycling is on pace to reach 2020 goals.

According to the 2014 American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) Sustainability Report, the U.S. paper recovery rate in 2013 fell to 63.5 percent. The 2012 paper recovery rate was higher — 65.1 percent — but still lower than 2011's record high rate of 66.4 percent, AF&PA's website shows.

The AF&PA report takes a slightly more broad perspective on the latest 2013 data, pointing to the rate being above 60 percent for five consecutive years and on track to reach 70 percent by 2020. In addition, the forest products group says paper recovery far outshines recycling rates seen for other packaging materials: The paper recovery rate, despite its latest fall, more than doubles the current glass recovery rate and triples the aluminum recovery rate. It's also much higher than the plastics recovery rate, which stood at 8.8 percent in 2012, according to the U.S. EPA.

While the latest statistics do not present paper generation numbers, in years past paper has held a shrinking share of the municipal solid waste stream due, in large part, to the shift to digital media.

That decline is expected to continue in the years ahead, especially as the publishing and information industries continue to digitize, leaving less of the highly recoverable material out there to recycle.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2014: The good, the bad and the ugly of EPR

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:08
Resource Recycling Conference 2014: The good, the bad and the ugly of EPR

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 23, 2014

Extended producer responsibility for packaging, a concept in which packaging producers pay for the recycling of relevant materials after they're discarded by consumers, has recently gained traction in the offices of some lawmakers and corporate decision-makers.

At this September's Resource Recycling Conference, a moderated panel discussion will help provide a balanced, honest and thought-provoking look at the EPR landscape. The session will include Paul Gardner of Recycling Reinvented, Chaz Miller of the National Waste & Recycling Association and Meghan Stasz of the Grocery Manufacturers Association. The perspectives of these expert panelists will offer attendees a full spectrum of viewpoints on the contentious issue.

Resource Recycling Conference 2014 is taking place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Sept. 15-17. Head to rrconference.com for more information on attending, sponsoring and exhibiting.

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Advocates continue push to halt Indianapolis MRF

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:04
Advocates continue push to halt Indianapolis MRF

By Dan Leif, Resource Recycling

July 23, 2014

Though the Indianapolis mayor's office has indicated a deal is done to bring a mixed-waste MRF to the city, opponents of the plan say the facility can still be stopped and that support for their cause is growing.

The office of the city's mayor, Greg Ballard, announced last month it had reached a deal with Covanta to construct a $45 million center to sort recyclables from mixed solid waste. Such facilities are sometimes called "dirty MRFs" and they allow for collection systems in which residents throw trash and recyclables in one curbside receptacle.

However, the Indiana Recycling Coalition (IRC) and a member of the Indianapolis city council say there's still time to stop the plan, which they argue was finalized without a full public vetting process and without considering other options for boosting recycling activity in the city of 820,000.

"The messaging on the Covanta deal from the mayor's office is, 'Don't worry we've got this done,'" said John Barth, an at-large member of the Indianapolis-Marion County City-County Council. "That's not a good sustainable approach for the future of the city, to just go ahead and say, 'Throw everything away.'"

Barth, who chairs the council's community affairs committee, put the recycling issue on the agenda for the committee's July 22 meeting, offering residents and industry members an opportunity to voice concerns and discuss alternative proposals. Neither the committee nor city council has the authority to block the Covanta deal, but the hope is to generate enough outcry to grab the attention of the city's board of public works, the entity that must approve the project by vote if it is to move forward.

"What I'm hoping to do is create a forum where the public can really understand what we're doing here is making a generational decision without having significant public input," Barth said.

The public works board, which includes a number of members who were appointed by the mayor, has not scheduled a vote on the issue, but it will also a hold a meeting this week to discuss the proposal and hear from community members, recycling advocates and other voices on both sides of the debate.

Consequently, the IRC has initiated a campaign to encourage residents and industry to reach out to the board with concerns. "The board of public works is allowing public testimony, which is not something they normally do," said Carey Hamilton, IRC's executive director. "It's a sign that people are being heard."

The Indianapolis mayor's office has argued the mixed-waste MRF is the best approach for a city that has experimented with different curbside offerings in the past but failed to see significant participation. Currently, Indianapolis residents can subscribe for curbside recyclables collection through individual haulers. "The Covanta proposal requires no funding from the government, no increased rates for taxpayers, and no government mandates being issued on the actions of the general public," said Marc Lotter, a spokesperson from the mayor's office.

Barth said the mayor's office is over-simplifying a complex problem. He said that if the city truly wants to revamp its recycling infrastructure it will need to figure out a multifaceted plan to integrate curbside into a system that currently involves many haulers with different contract terms.

"The mayor has an affinity for one-size-fits-all solutions," said Barth, "but in a complex city of nearly 1 million people, one-size-fits-all is not always the right decision."

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Scrap plastics exports show more gains

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:00
Scrap plastics exports show more gains

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 23, 2014

Exports of recovered plastics saw healthy rises during May, the most recent month for which data is available. Steel, meanwhile, continued to decline sharply and paper remained flat.

May scrap plastics exports saw a rise of 7.0 percent from April 2014 export levels, with 425.11 million pounds exported in May 2014. When matched against May 2013 levels — when China's Operation Green Fence was just past its April peak — the volume of plastic scrap exports was also up, by 27.2 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in May, at 19.78 cents per pound, was down by 2.8 percent from its April 2014 standing of 20.36. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 6.6 percent.

Through May, at 1.92 billion pounds, the volume of recovered plastics exported was up 12.7 percent from its 2013 year-to-date (YTD) figure. At 19.73 cents per pound, however, the average price through May was down 3.2 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

As for other exported materials, recovered paper exports saw small declines for the first five months of 2014, with 8.10 million metric tons exported, a 0.2 percent increase from May 2013 levels. At $165 per metric ton, the weighted average price of exported recovered paper in May was also a bit flat, up just 0.3 percent when compared with its May 2013 level.

Regarding ferrous scrap, however, the story continued to be one of strong declines, with the 6.32 million metric tons exported through May 2014 amounting to a sharp 25.8 percent YOY decrease. At $402 per metric ton, the weighted average price of exported ferrous scrap was also
down — 4.1 percent from May 2013 levels.

Lastly, the 1.50 billion pounds of aluminum scrap exported through May 2014 equated to a 9.8 percent decrease from the first five months of 2013. At 77 cents per pound, the average price of exported aluminum scrap through May 2014 was down 3.6 percent YOY.


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Former NM governor and scrap metal processor signs federal consent agreement

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:55
Former NM governor and scrap metal processor signs federal consent agreement

By Jerry Powell, Resource Recycling

July 23, 2014

Natural Blue Resources is a publicly traded scrap metal firm, but probably not for much longer. It seems the firm’s top executives, including a former governor, have been charged with security fraud.

According to Bloomberg News, Toney Anaya, who served as New Mexico’s governor from 1983 to 1987, was CEO of the company for about 18 months. He recently settled fraud charges with the federal Security and Exchange Commission (SEC). It seems Anaya was remiss in not telling investors in the Santa Fe, New Mexico firm that two other company executives had previously been convicted of security fraud.

The SEC has suspended trading in the firm. Company executives claimed the firm was prime for growth and that its Woburn, Massachusetts metal recycling operation had recently secured 14 important contracts. In reality, the operation had garnered no business and Natural Blue Resources had no income.

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Ontario's PPP producers report on 2013 recycling efforts

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:51
Ontario's PPP producers report on 2013 recycling efforts

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

July 23, 2014

Packaging producers in Ontario spent almost $100 million in 2013 to help fund municipal recycling programs in the province.

Stewardship Ontario, the group representing Ontario's producers of printed paper and packaging (PPP), released initial 2013 figures earlier this month.

All told, producers — or "stewards" — of PPP spent almost $100 million to help divert just under 1 million tons of material during the year. The province's PPP recycling rate fell from 64 percent in 2012 to 62.8 percent in 2013.

An extended producer responsibility program for Ontario was approved in 2003 and holds producers and various related entities responsible for partially funding the collection and recycling of PPP.

According to Stewardship Ontario, producers pay for "about half of the cost" of running municipal curbside recycling programs for PPP. Municipalities are required to pay for the rest of the costs themselves.

In a graphic-heavy rundown of key 2013 milestones and data, the program says just 42 percent of Ontarians choose to recycle expanded polystyrene containers while just 37 percent reported recycling single-use plastic bags. A strong majority of residents, 70 percent, said they believe manufacturers should fund the collection program.

The province also runs a fully producer funded "orange box" recycling program for hazardous or "special" wastes. Producers of those wastes paid out roughly $40 million to collect nearly 24,000 tons of material in 2013.


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Patent watch

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:44
Patent watch

July 23, 2014

Patent No. D707,905 was given to IPL, Inc. from St. Damien, California for a recycling container and lid.

Patent No. 8,763,941, which describes a plastic beverage container shredder in a bottle-shaped housing, was awarded to Lawrence V. Beck, Jr. from Downingtown, Pennsylvania.

St. Helier, Great Britain's Elastomer Technologies Ltd. has devised a method for recycling natural and synthetic rubbers, and was awarded Patent Application No. 20140175332.

An automated collection and scale system for the collection of recyclables is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140182951, given to the Curotto-Can LLC, based in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Responsible Packaging Institute LLC from Green Lake, Wisconsin, was awarded Patent Application No. 20140188752 for a system of grading and labeling packaging that demonstrates whether "responsible practices are being incorporated into product packaging," including recyclability.

Patent Application No. 20140191068 was given to Li-Feng Cheng from Taipei City, Taiwan for a system of shredding and processing scrap tires.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:38
NewsBits

July 23, 2014

Austell, Georgia-based recycled paperboard company Caraustar has acquired a recycling facility in Nashville, Tennessee. While few details have emerged on the deal, Caraustar, which makes 100 percent recycled paperboard and converted paperboard products, will use the former facility of SP Recycling Southeast to expand its geographical footprint, a press release reads.

With the help of TerraCycle, New Orleans has launched a cigarette recycling program to help cut down on litter citywide. The program is the first of its kind to cover an entire city and 50 cigarette recycling receptacles have been strategically placed throughout the Big Easy.

Vancouver, British Columbia is in the early stages of trialing workplace recycling at all city offices. Just three weeks old, the program asks workers to dump all recyclables into one blue bin. A designated city employee sorts through the bin once full to separate materials into five categories: refundable containers, mixed containers, mixed paper, food scraps and landfill.

Vermont has released an interactive tool dubbed the Materials Management Map. The map provides businesses and residents with a detailed list of recycling, reuse and composting options throughout the state and is geared toward businesses attempting to contract composting services as part of Vermont's recycling law, the first phase of which went into effect July 1.

Beer company and bottler SABMiller is aiming to increase the returnability of its bottles, especially in the European market. According to a new sustainability report, 49 percent of the company's bottles are able to be returned and refilled and SABMiller would like to boost that percentage as it nears 2020 carbon footprint reduction goals.

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Great Expectations

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 11:51
Great Expectations

By Bobby Elliott and Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

July 17, 2014

Three-year-old E-Waste Systems, Inc. (EWSI) claims to be the next industry leader.  But do its globetrotting partnerships and multimillion dollar revenue projections add up?

From the print edition of E-Scrap News -- Click the image below for the full text:

 

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