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Plastics exporter slammed again over Philippines shipment

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:30
Plastics exporter slammed again over Philippines shipment

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

A Canadian exporter is being accused of continuing to send containers full of trash to the Philippines.

According to the nonprofit watchdog group Basel Action Network (BAN), Chronic Inc. recently sent 48 containers of household waste marked as recycled plastic to the Port of Manilla. BAN, an environmental watchdog group based in Seattle, called attention last year to a similar shipment of 50 containers of material tied to Chronic, the Whitby, Ontario-based firm. That shipment, BAN says, remains at the Port of Manilla unclaimed.

Canada and the Philippines, as signatories to the Basel Convention, are prohibited from sending household waste to one another without written consent from both governments. BAN says such consent was not provided to Chronic.

In addition, BAN argues the Canadian government is required to take back all 98 containers and "prosecute the exporter criminally."

Despite pressure from BAN and others, the Canadian government has thus far referred to the issue as a "private commercial matter," the Toronto Star reported on May 20.

After initially denying the first reported shipment of household waste, Chronic owner Jim Makris has not responded to various requests for comment by the media, including Resource Recycling.

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Major US school districts abandon EPS plates

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:29
Major US school districts abandon EPS plates

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

More than 2 million K-12 students across the country will begin eating their meals on compostable fiber plates, instead of those made from expanded polystyrene.

The following school districts are switching from EPS plates to fiber ones made from 100 percent post-industrial fiber: New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami-Dade, Dallas and Orlando. Those districts make up the Urban School Food Alliance.

The move is expected to remove 225 million EPS trays per year from landfills, according to the Alliance.

"Shifting from polystyrene trays to compostable plates will allow these cities to dramatically slash waste sent to landfills, reduce plastics pollution in our communities and oceans, and create valuable compost that can be re-used on our farms," Mark Izeman, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), stated in a press release. NRDC is a nonprofit partner of the Alliance.

EPS has come under fire in some jurisdictions because it isn't widely recycled. Starting July 1, New York City's ban on EPS food-service products goes into effect. That ban includes foam plates used by schools.

All New York schools are expected to have the fiber plates by the end of the month, while other school districts should have full use by next school year, Alliance spokeswoman Tatum Wan said.

The fiber plates are manufactured in Waterville, Maine by Huhtamaki North America. The molded-fiber round plates, made from post-industrial newsprint, are FDA-approved, according to a press release.

The company designed the plates after the Alliance sent it specifications, Wan said. EPS trays average about 4 cents each, and the compostable replacements cost 12 cents each, according to the press release. By combining their purchasing leverage through the Alliance, the six school districts are buying the fiber plates for about 5 cents each.

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Plastics-to-fuel group reaches out to state officials

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:29
Plastics-to-fuel group reaches out to state officials

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

If all non-recycled plastics in the U.S. were converted to oil, the effort would generate enough transportation fuel to power nearly 9 million cars per year.

That's according to a video explaining and touting the benefits of plastics-to-fuel technology. The video, "Plastics-to-Fuel: Creating Energy from Non-Recycled Plastics," is from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance (PTOTA).

The video is accompanied by a guide, "Regulatory Treatment of Plastics-to-Fuel Facilities," and a fact sheet, intended to influence government regulators. The guide calls on state officials to regulate plastics-to-fuel facilities as manufacturers of products, not as solid waste disposal facilities, and to reward public waste system operators with diversion credits for sending materials to plastics-to-fuel facilities.

“Plastics-to-fuel technologies complement recycling by converting non-recycled plastics into useful commodities,” Craig Cookson, director of sustainability and recycling for ACC’s Plastics Division, stated in a press release. “Plastics are a valuable resource that should be kept out of landfills, and plastics-to-fuel technologies can help us do that.”

The conversion technology, called pyrolysis, can turn post-consumer plastics into fuels and other petroleum-based feedstocks for manufacturing.

The Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance includes Agilyx Corporation (Beaverton, Ore.), Cynar Plc (London), RES Polyflow (Akron, Ohio), Americas Styrenics (The Woodlands, Texas), Sealed Air (Charlotte, N.C.) and Tetra Tech (Pasadena, Calif.).

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Toronto expands program to include most films

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:28
Toronto expands program to include most films

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

Starting July 1, residents of Toronto will be allowed to put a wide variety of plastic film items in their curbside recycling bins.

Toronto's curbside program, which already accepts plastic retail bags for recycling, will soon include sandwich, milk and bread bags and newspaper bags along with dry cleaning bags and diaper packaging. It will not accept biodegradable, black or laminated film.

Adding any type of film to a single-stream recycling program is relatively rare. Materials recovery facilities (MRFs) tend to view the material as challenging to sort and process due to its tendency to clog machinery, as well as raising pre-baled film storage capacity issues.

According to a report from the city, which can be viewed here, a "stable market for the expanded list of plastic film materials has now been established" and all film will be recovered by Canada Fibers' Toronto MRF.

The City expects just under 4,000 tons of film, or approximately 38 to 46 percent of single household generation of the material, will be recovered as a result of the program's expansion. It also expects the city's overall diversion rate to increase by 0.35 percent.

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Calling all recycling innovators

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:28
Calling all recycling innovators

May 27, 2015

Submit your innovative ideas for improving the plastics recycling industry today.

The 2015 Recycling Innovators Forum and is now accepting entries from people and organizations with actionable ideas to advance recycling. The deadline for submissions is June 1, 2015.

This fall's Forum marks the third year for the recycling innovation event.

Up to 10 finalists will receive travel and lodging scholarships to attend the Resource Recycling Conference, to be held Sept. 28-30 in Indianapolis. The finalists will present their ideas to a panel of judges and an audience of industry decision-makers and investors at the Recycling Innovators Forum, held on Sept. 28 in conjunction with the conference. Judges will select a winner to receive a $20,000 prize to help move their innovation forward.

Resource Recycling magazine, sister publication to Plastics Recycling Update, will also feature the winning ideas in online and print stories.

In 2014, one winner was the Healthcare Plastics Recycling Council, which aims to build stakeholder coordination around recovering and recycling plastic material from hospitals. Those receiving honorable mentions included Creative Plastics Technology, which creates moldings from mixed plastics otherwise headed to landfill, and Zzyzx Polymers, which used a continuous mechanochemical compatibilization to process and optimize the use of mixed plastics.

The third annual Recycling Innovators Forum is made possible thanks to major sponsorships from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics Division, Waste Management and Resource Recycling, Inc., with additional support from the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries and the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers.

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<i>PetroChem Wire</i>: Recycled Nylon 6 and 66 pellets strengthen

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:27
PetroChem Wire: Recycled Nylon 6 and 66 pellets strengthen

Month 27, 2015

Recycled Nylon 6 and Nylon 66 prices are stronger in late May on proposed virgin nylon price increases.

Nylon 6 post-industrial black pellets were done at 78 to 80 cents per pound last week, while Nylon 66 pellets sold at 81 to 83 cents per pound, both FOB U.S. East Coast and both up 1 cent per pound from the middle of May. Nylon 6 flake material was also higher. Nylon 6 regrind prices rose 1 to 2 cents per pound for the week ended May 22.

U.S. producers of prime nylon resin are looking for a total price increase for May and June deliveries of 7 cents per pound, which would bring prime prices above $1 per pound. Higher crude oil prices are being cited for the proposed nylon price increases.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 10:26
NewsBits

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

May 27, 2015

The California Assembly approved a ban on plastic microbeads in personal care products. The ban, described by supporters as the strongest in the nation, passed the Assembly 59-12. The bill, AB 888, now heads to the Senate. If enacted into law, the ban would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

State officials have announced the launch of a competition in Michigan aimed at increasing the state's recycling rate. Called Recycle By Design, the competition is the result of a partnership between the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, the Michigan Recycling Coalition and IMG Rebel. Michigan's 15 percent recycling rate lags behind that of its neighboring states and the national average.

Chinese authorities plan to crack down on companies illegally buying, selling or renting government licenses to import plastic scrap, government officials said at a May 18 conference in the city of Guangzhou, as reported by Plastics News. Imported plastics increased in 2014, after the 2013 launch of Operation Green Fence, the Chinese customs enforcement effort. In the second half of this year, customs officials and environmental regulators will heighten their focus on the proper use of licenses and administrative issues.

Plastic beverage container recycling markets may grow an average of 3.9 percent each year through 2019, according to one forecast. The "Global Recycle Market for Plastic Bottle Industry 2015-2019" report said the the food packaging industry has propelled the growth.

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How biggest US cities are approaching recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:15
How biggest US cities are approaching recycling

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

May 26, 2015

An analysis of the recycling programs of the 10 biggest cities in the U.S. shows single-stream collection is the norm – and foam polystyrene and plastic bags are being shooed away from carts.

According to the just-updated U.S. Census, the 10 largest U.S. cities are:

  • New York (8.49 million people)
  • Los Angeles (3.93 million people)
  • Chicago (2.72 million people)
  • Houston (2.24 million people)
  • Philadelphia (1.56 million people)
  • Phoenix (1.54 million people)
  • San Antonio (1.44 million people)
  • San Diego (1.38 million people)
  • Dallas (1.28 million people)
  • San Jose (1.02 million people)

Of those cities, nine offer single-stream recycling collection to residents, research by Resource Recycling has found. New York, while looking to make a switch to single-stream collection in the near future, is the only top city still using a dual-stream system.

The Big Apple, however, is generally in line with the rest of the pack when it comes to what materials are accepted for curbside recycling. According to Resource Recycling's look at educational and outreach materials from the cities, all 10 currently accept glass containers, paper products and a wide range of plastics, except expanded polystyrene (EPS) and plastic bags.

San Antonio and Los Angeles are the only cities in the top 10 list that allow residents to put plastic bags and EPS in with other recyclables. San Antonio's recycling program does not allow residents to recycle packing peanuts curbside.

Recycling programs generally refer residents to drop off plastic bags at grocery stores. EPS foam, meanwhile, is generally directed toward drop-off locations. Both products are recyclable, but have posed sortation and mechanical challenges at materials recovery facilities nationwide.

The inclusion of glass in each of the programs comes at a time when many communities are grappling with the material.

Recycling and diversion rates for the biggest U.S. cities tend to be harder to pin down.

For those cities that publish and use recycling rates, San Diego's curbside rate of 24 percent and Philadelphia's rate of 21 percent are highest, but both are still below the national average of 34.5 percent. Three other cities have recently offered up a curbside recycling rate as well: New York's latest estimate suggests the recycling rate is at 15.4 percent while Chicago is at 11.1 percent and Houston sits at 6 percent.

Los Angeles reports a diversion rate of 76.4 percent, which includes both waste-to-energy activity and use of solid waste as alternative daily cover at landfills.

Program websites for Dallas, Phoenix, San Antonio and San Jose do not provide recycling or diversion rates.

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Plastics exporter slammed again over Philippines shipment

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:14
Plastics exporter slammed again over Philippines shipment

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

May 26, 2015

A Canadian exporter is being accused of continuing to send containers full of trash to the Philippines.

According to the nonprofit watchdog group Basel Action Network (BAN), Chronic Inc. recently sent 48 containers of household waste marked as recycled plastic to the Port of Manilla. BAN, an environmental watchdog group based in Seattle, called attention last year to a similar shipment of 50 containers of material also tied to Chronic, a Whitby, Ontatio-based firm. That shipment, BAN says, remains at the Port of Manilla unclaimed.

Canada and the Philippines, as signatories to the Basel Convention, are prohibited from sending household waste to one another without written consent from both governments. BAN says such consent was not provided to Chronic.

In addition, BAN argues the Canadian government is required to take back all 98 containers and "prosecute the exporter criminally."

Despite pressure from BAN and others, the Canadian government has thus far referred to the issue as a "private commercial matter," the Toronto Star reported on May 20.

After initially denying the first reported shipment of household waste, Chronic owner Jim Makris has not responded to various requests for comment by the media, including Resource Recycling.

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ISRI details 'economy-driving' scrap sector

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:13
ISRI details 'economy-driving' scrap sector

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

May 26, 2015

An economic impact study commissioned by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries estimates the U.S. scrap industry directly employs nearly 150,000 workers with an average annual salary pushing $77,000.

The study, conducted by John Dunham and Associates, speaks to the "resilient, job-creating, and economy-driving industry," said Robin Wiener, ISRI president.

"As the first link in the manufacturing chain and as a major exporter, the scrap recycling industry is a leading indicator to the overall health of the U.S. economy," Wiener stated in a press release. "While the last several months have been difficult for commodities, this study suggests hope for a rebound."

Low commodity and oil prices and a West Coast port dispute that delayed bales from leaving the country have combined to make 2015 a challenging year for the industry.

Still, the ISRI study suggests 149,000 workers are directly employed by scrap processors and brokers and make $77,153 on average per year. Employment has increased 8 percent since ISRI's 2013 estimate of 137,970 jobs.

An additional 171,350 jobs, the 2015 study notes, are indirectly created by the recycling sector. A total of 151,227 "induced" jobs are said to be generated from "re-spending of wages by workers in the direct and supplier sectors."

Combining direct, supplier and induced categories, the study suggests more than 471,000 jobs are tied to the scrap industry, generating annual economic activity of almost $106 billion. Accounting for 0.68 percent of overall economic activity in the U.S., the scrap industry "is similar in size to the data processing and hosting industry, the dental industry and the automotive repair industry," according to the study.

About a quarter of jobs directly created by the scrap trade are through exports, the research suggests.

A state-by-state breakdown of the data can be viewed here.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Schedule now available

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:12
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Schedule now available

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

May 26, 2015

Be sure to be in Indianapolis this fall for the most complete and engaging look at municipal recycling. The Resource Recycling Conference lineup features an array of sessions that give attendees a true holistic view of the industry,

Noted journalist Adam Minter will be delivering a keynote identifying global trends and tying them back to curbside, and other sessions will offer up relevant tools and strategies to cut contamination, boost organics recovery, harness data and more. The conference will also feature a compelling panel discussion digging into the current Indianapolis mixed-waste MRF debate and tying that processing battle to North American recycling as a whole.

For more details on all the Resource Recycling Conference has to offer, check out the recently posted schedule here

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Head to rrconference.com for more information on attending, sponsoring and exhibiting.


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Webinar touts power of pay-as-you-throw

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:11
Webinar touts power of pay-as-you-throw

By Jared Paben, Resource Recycling

May 26, 2015

The small city of Edgewater, Colo., had unlimited trash disposal for residents for $12.50 per month. It also had a diversion rate just below 7 percent.

Then the Denver-area city implemented pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) waste disposal, with progressively more expensive service for larger garbage cans. The diversion rate immediately jumped to nearly 18 percent, and now it's around 20 percent.

Juri Freeman, recycling program manager at the City and County of Denver, provided this example to show how PAYT programs can affect recycling rates. He was one of several speakers on a U.S. EPA webinar, part of the Sustainable Materials Management Web Academy series.

The PAYT-focused session also included presentations from Lisa Skumatz, Dana D'Souza and Dawn BeMent of Skumatz Economic Research Associates and the nonprofit organization Econservation Institute.

PAYT programs encourage waste-reduction and diversion efforts, particularly for mixed recyclable materials and organics, which make up the largest portions of the municipal-waste stream, Skumatz said.

"The only real weakness in pay-as-you-throw is the political will you need to get it in place," she said.

The most successful PAYT programs embed recycling fees in the garbage service rates, regularly collect recyclable materials (at least once every two weeks), provide large cans for recyclable materials (at least 96 gallons) and price service to encourage behavior change, Skumatz added.

With regard to service price, a 50 percent to 80 percent rate differential is recommended, and 80 percent is considered optimal, Skumatz said. For example, a customer would pay $10 for a 32-gallon cart or $18 for a 64-gallon receptacle. The higher prices don't reflect the actual added costs of collecting a large can; they're meant to drive behavior change, she said.

Skumatz estimates nearly 9,000 U.S. communities have a PAYT program, with Louisiana the lone state without a PAYT community. Additionally, 62 of the largest 100 U.S. cities have a PAYT system. Her firm is working to develop updated numbers for 2015.

D'Souza said automated collections aren't required to establish a successful program, noting that many successful programs use bags, not carts.

"It doesn't require a completely new collection system to establish pay-as-you-throw," D'Souza said.

Despite concerns that PAYT will cause more residents to put non-recyclable material into carts, surveys show the strategy doesn't lead to a significant contamination increase, Skumatz said. However, a community implementing PAYT must have a program allowing households to dispose of bulky items legally and affordably, she said.

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Plastics-to-fuel interests aim to sway regulators

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:10
Plastics-to-fuel interests aim to sway regulators

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

May 15 2015

If all non-recycled plastics in the U.S. were converted to oil, the effort would generate enough transportation fuel to power nearly 9 million cars per year.

That's according to a video explaining and touting the benefits of plastics-to-fuel technology. The video, "Plastics-to-Fuel: Creating Energy from Non-Recycled Plastics," is from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance (PTOTA).

The video is accompanied by a guide, "Regulatory Treatment of Plastics-to-Fuel Facilities," and a fact sheet, intended to influence government regulators. The guide calls on state officials to regulate plastics-to-fuel facilities as manufacturers of products, not as solid waste disposal facilities, and to reward public waste system operators with diversion credits for sending materials to plastics-to-fuel facilities.

“Plastics-to-fuel technologies complement recycling by converting non-recycled plastics into useful commodities,” Craig Cookson, director of sustainability and recycling for ACC’s Plastics Division, stated in a press release. “Plastics are a valuable resource that should be kept out of landfills, and plastics-to-fuel technologies can help us do that.”

The conversion technology, called pyrolysis, can turn post-consumer plastics into fuels and other petroleum-based feedstocks for manufacturing.

The Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance includes Agilyx Corporation (Beaverton, Ore.), Cynar Plc (London), RES Polyflow (Akron, Ohio), Americas Styrenics (The Woodlands, Texas), Sealed Air (Charlotte, N.C.) and Tetra Tech (Pasadena, Calif.).


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Programs in flux

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:09
Programs in flux

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

May 26, 2015

This week we take a look at a handful of local, state and national recycling programs that are undergoing notable shifts.

Santa Fe, N.M. is working to switch to single-stream recycling, but the change could mean jettisoning glass from the collection program. The city is working to expand collection of other materials, but it might eliminate or reduce pick-ups of glass, relying instead on residents dropping off their glass at depots.

Harrisburg, Penn. has added cartons to its recycling program, becoming the latest state capital to add the material to its accepted list, according to the Carton Council of North America. The City has also ordered new carts to accommodate an augmented list of accepted materials. The Carton Council's "Carton Capitals" initiative aims to encourage more state capitals to adopt carton recycling.

The New York City Housing Authority could find itself fending off a lawsuit over the lack of recycling resources it provides its tenants, according to citylimits.org. The Natural Resources Defense Council has threatened to sue the housing authority if the agency doesn't comply with city recycling laws within 60 days and provide recycling to all residents.

Kentucky awarded 46 recycling grants and 25 household hazardous waste grants totaling more than $3.3 million. The grants will be used by local government entities to expand recycling and improve management of hazardous materials, including e-scrap. The Kentucky Pride Fund grants are funded by a $1.75 fee for each ton of MSW sent to landfills.

Six of the country's largest school districts will stop purchasing polystyrene (PS) cafeteria plates and serve meals on compostable paper plates instead, according to the Urban School Food Alliance. The school districts include New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami-Dade, Dallas and Orlando. PS trays are generally cheaper than their fiber counterparts. The six districts say they are able to use their collective purchasing power to buy compostable plates for about the cost of PS items.

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NewsBits from Resource Recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 13:05
NewsBits

May 26, 2015

By a vote of 26-7, the New Jersey Senate last week passed a measure that would install a paint stewardship program in the Garden State. The bill, which was created by the paint manufacturing industry, would add an unspecified fee to the wholesale price of cans of paint in New Jersey. It now heads to the Assembly Appropriations Committee for further consideration. There are currently nine states in the U.S. with paint stewardship programs in place.

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries paid Hillary Rodham Clinton $225,500 to speak at the 2014 ISRI Convention and Exposition in Las Vegas, according to a report by Time. That amount was in line with the sums other organizations the former Secretary of State and current Democratic presidential candidate to speak at their events last year.

The Aluminum Association and Can Manufacturers Institute have released a study on the sustainability advantages of using aluminum. According to the study, the average aluminum can today contains about 70 percent recycled content and is the most easily and readily recycled packaging product in the U.S.

The Supreme Court has decided not to hear a case attempting to upend the nation's first producer-funded take-back program for pharmaceuticals. The law, passed in California's Alameda County, was being challenged by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America.

Publicly traded waste-to-energy firm Covanta has acquired Wisconsin-based Advanced Waste Services. While details on the acquisition will not be released until July, when Covanta reports on quarterly financial results, a company spokesperson for Covanta confirmed the acquisition of the industrial waste and recycling firm.

Nearly two-thirds of people support the idea that extended producer responsibility should be applied to as many products as possible, according to a study by the National Institute for Environmental Studies in Japan and the Lund University in Sweden. The study also looked at the attitudes of product makers and government regulators toward the EPR practice. Not surprisingly, governments were more supportive that brands.

State officials have announced the launch of a competition in Michigan aimed at increasing the state's recycling rate. Called Recycle By Design, the competition is the result of a partnership between the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Recycling Coalition and IMG Rebel. Michigan's 15 percent recycling rate lags behind that of its neighboring states and the national average.

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Illinois legislators allow retrievable CRT storage

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 08:51
Illinois legislators allow retrievable CRT storage

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

May 21, 2015

Illinois legislators have unanimously passed a bill that, if signed into law, would count leaded CRT glass stored at a designated landfill cell toward manufacturer recycling goals.

After passing the House in April by a vote of 114-0, the Illinois Senate on Tuesday passed the measure 53-0. The bill now needs Gov. Bruce Rauner's signature to become law.

Under Illinois' electronics recycling program, manufacturers are required to collect and recycle select electronic devices, including CRT TVs and monitors. While the Illinois EPA typically determines what counts as recycling (and what counts as disposal), numerous solid waste agencies in the state pushed lawmakers early this year to weigh in on the storage idea and offer up legislation.

The resulting legislation, House Bill 1455, gained numerous Democratic and Republican sponsors as it made its way to Gov. Rauner's desk. Kuusakoski U.S., the American wing of Finland-based Kuusakoski Recycling, could stand to gain the most from the measure's passage.

Implications for Kuusakoski

Through a partnership with Peoria Disposal Company (PDC), Kuusakoski has announced plans to use the storage approach as an alternative to current CRT glass recycling outlets. The company, which has been using CRT glass as alternative daily cover (ADC) at a PDC landfill, has defended the approach and stated glass will be retrievable for future recovery.

While the Illinois EPA views the method as recycling under the state electronics recycling program, the bill that made its way through the Illinois General Assembly makes that determination law.

Rich Hipp, Kuusakoski's president and CEO, told E-Scrap News the company will stop its ADC operation and start storing glass "if and when the governor of Illinois signs HB 1455 into law."

"We will ask PDC to stop using treated CRT glass as alternate daily cover at its Indian Creek Landfill, and start managing the glass in a retrievable storage cell at its site so that Illinois residents, as well as our customers, can begin benefiting from this new law," Hipp said in a statement sent to E-Scrap News.

Review by e-Stewards

Kuusakoski has also identified e-Stewards' support as key for its storage operation.

Leaders of the e-scrap environmental certification and other stakeholders with ties to it are currently reviewing the storage idea and its compliance with the standard. If it is found to be an acceptable recycling option, e-Stewards members currently restricted to sending glass to Kuusakoski only as a "last resort" would be able to ship glass to the operation more freely.

Sarah Westervelt, e-Stewards' policy director, explained a working group continues to evaluate the option but has not yet made a decision on the matter.

"The CRT Working Group continues its exploration of the proposal and the complex issues arising from it, and is completing additional research," Westervelt stated. "Thus, it has not yet made its recommendation to the Leadership Council."

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Dell eyes growth in recycled plastic use

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 08:50
Dell eyes growth in recycled plastic use

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

May 21, 2015

Texas-based Dell has set its sights on using more recycled plastic, including plastics recovered from scrap electronics, in the manufacture of new equipment.

"We expect to see it grow over the coming years," Maureen Martinez, Dell's senior manager of environmental affairs, told E-Scrap News. "We're trying to be a good steward of the environment and we understand that material usage is a big part of that."

Dell has rolled out take-back programs around the world of late, and Martinez says the company has also recognized the potential for reusing a variety of materials in new products. In 2014, the company leveraged slightly more than 10 million pounds of recycled plastic, offering a variety of desktops and monitors with recycled plastics from recovered electronics. Dell wants to use 50 million pounds of recovered plastic by 2020.

"We're actually well on our way to meeting and exceeding that 2020 goal," Martinez said.

While initial concerns were raised regarding the performance and appearance of post-consumer resin being incorporated into new products, thus far Dell has been able to ramp up use. What's more, Martinez says cost has been a relatively on par with using virgin plastics.

"For the most part it tends to be pretty cost-neutral," Martinez said.

Not all electronic devices are ideal sources of recovered material, Dell has found. According to Martinez, lighter and thinner devices use "plastics with a much higher performance requirement and so it is more challenging in that area to drive the introduction of recycled content."

In addition to increasing use of recycled plastic when possible, Martinez's team is currently looking into the viability of using additional recycled materials, though she would not offer specifics.

"Hopefully in the coming months that's something we'll be able to talk about," Martinez said.

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Call2Recycle confronts shifting battery landscape

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 08:50
Call2Recycle confronts shifting battery landscape

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 21, 2015

Coming off a year of record battery collections, Call2Recycle is now looking to expand consumer take-back points and move into more markets.

That's according to the nonprofit battery stewardship organization's annual report, which looked both backward and forward.

In 2014, the industry-funded group oversaw the collection of nearly 6,000 tons of batteries and cell phones in the U.S. and Canada, a record collection total for Call2Recycle. The record comes despite a general decrease in the size and weight of batteries. Last year, the group also hit a milestone: collection of 50,000 tons over the effort's 20 years in existence.

The group also welcomed more than 30 new battery and product manufacturers in 2014, minimizing the number of "freeriders," or manufacturers whose batteries are recycled but don't help pay for take-back and recycling. By the end of the year, it saw participation from manufacturers of 85 percent of the portable rechargeable power industry.

Not all was good news for the group. In December, Waste Diversion Ontario (WDO) rejected Call2Recycle's application to take over single-use battery collection and recycling in Canada's most populous province. Among other reasons cited, WDO "determined that the plan as proposed by Call2Recycle had the potential to cause significant impacts on the single-use battery post-collection marketplace." The decision left single-use battery take-back in the hands of industry-funded group Stewardship Ontario, while Call2Recycle continues to provide take-back and recycling for rechargeable batteries in the province.

Still, Call2Recycle sees change on the horizon. "Looking ahead, we are facing a changing landscape driven by the explosive growth of mobile devices and the increasing demand for end-of-life disposal of all consumer portable batteries (both rechargeable and alkaline)," Call2Recycle CEO Carl Smith wrote in the report.

The group will focus on improving consumers' options for recycling batteries (currently, most of the collected material comes from businesses). An estimated 90 percent of U.S. and Canadian households live within 10 miles of a take-back location; Call2Recycle wants to improve that to 95 percent.

The group will also enter new markets, including offering a single-use battery take-back program in Vermont starting in 2016, Smith wrote. Vermont is the first U.S. state to implement extended-producer responsibility for single-use batteries, and Call2Recycle has applied to manage collections and recycling on behalf of several manufacturers.

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Wide world of e-scrap

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 08:49
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 21, 2015

Thailand backs national e-scrap legislation and India decides not to require enhanced documentation on scrap imported into the nation.

Thailand's government is in support of a national e-scrap law requiring manufacturers to fund the collection and recycling of end-of-life electronics, the Bangkok Post reports. According to a government spokesperson, the bill in question would also require manufacturers to enhance the recyclability of electronic devices.

Oman's capital city is expected to build an industrial waste processing center capable of recycling e-scrap. Oman Environmental Services Holding Company announced it will build the site in Sohar and expects to have it running by 2016.

Australia's mobile phone recycling program, MobileMuster, has added Alcatel One to its roster of manufacturer funders. The program, which covers mobile phones and accessories, allows consumers to drop off items free of charge at participating retailers.

More details on Hong Kong's government-funded, $71 million facility are beginning to emerge. The facility's designer, builder and operator is connected to a German company, Alba Group. Working as ALBA Integrated Waste Solutions Hong Kong Limited in Hong Kong, Alba will hold an initial 12-year contract with the city and could ramp up its annual processing capacity from 33,000 tons to almost 62,000 tons in that span. According to the South China Morning Post, Hong Kong generates roughly 77,000 tons of e-scrap per year.

On July 1, India will introduce scrap loading regulations that will not require scrap metal exporters in the U.S. and elsewhere to provide video and photographic footage of shipments, Recycling International reports. Originally, Indian officials advocated for requiring exporters to document pre-shipment loads, a proposal that drew heat from many groups, including the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries.

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<i>E-Scrap 2015</i>: State programs in focus

E-Scrap News Magazine - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 08:49
E-Scrap 2015: State programs in focus

May 21, 2015

With tightened commodity markets, question marks around CRT glass processing and a growing docket of data on hand, the leaders of state e-scrap programs are now trying to determine the best path forward.

At E-Scrap 2015 this September, the shifting state program landscape will be discussed in-depth. Attendees will get the perspectives of policy experts, processing firms, device manufacturers and state officials. Together, those voices will help to show a complete picture of the current landscape and explain how your firm can fit into the evolution of government-mandated electronics recycling. Don't miss these crucial discussions.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (that's the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Last year's conference brought together more than 1,300 attendees from 35 countries and similar numbers are expected for the upcoming iteration. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.


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