NewsBits

NewsBits

July marks the one year anniversary of RECYC-QUÉBEC, Quebec's first Extended Producer Responsibility program. In its second year, the program enters phase two of its planned development by adding component products to its list of covered products.

Auto manufacturer General Motors Co. has saved over $1 billion in revenue annually through its environmental and recycling initiatives. GM's 2012 Sustainability Report asserts that the company diverts from landfill more than 90 percent of its manufacturing waste (through reuse, recycling and waste-to-energy projects), with 105 landfill-free facilities leading the charge.

California is looking to increase tire recycling by providing nearly $2 million in grants to 45 agencies in 29 counties. The awarded agencies will hold annual tire recycling events for the next two years, allowing residents to drop off their tires for free.

The city of Columbus, Ohio has partnered with the Carton Council of North America to develop an educational awareness program to increase recycling of food and beverage cartons throughout the city. The city hopes the program will be as successful as its residential recycling program, RecyColumbus, which saved the city a reported $1.24 million in landfill deposit fees.

Coca-Cola is selling its classic soft drink a little differently this summer in Colombia, using a limited-edition bottle made entirely of ice. The product is being marketed in the South American nation as an eco-friendly, plastic-free alternative, but environmental groups are already concerned that a red rubber band around each bottle, intended to keep consumers' hands warm, will turn into litter once the glass melts.

Residents in the Minneapolis area are hoping an ordinance passes soon to keep collection carts out of public eye on non-collection days. "Years ago we just had garbage containers; now we have the larger recycling containers, and so many people have one or two yard waste containers," Golden Valley Fire Chief Mark Kuhnly told the city's Star Tribune. "You do end up with quite a lineup of containers at some houses."

Paper and corrugated packaging company Pratt Industries has donated 16 solar-powered paper recycling units that will be located at highly trafficked areas in Lower Manhattan and help New York City continue to try to up its recycling rate. The initiative is a partnership between Pratt, the city and Lower Manhattan advocacy group Downtown Alliance.

 

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