NewsBits

NewsBits

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

In Iowa, backers of an expanded bottle bill are trying a new approach to promote adding materials to the Hawkeye State's beverage container redemption program that involves cupcakes. Supporters of legislation that would put a 5-cent deposit on non-carbonated beverage containers, such as water bottles and energy drinks, put plastic bottles in the mailboxes of lawmakers with note saying that it could be redeemed for one cupcake from bottle bill supporters on the first floor rotunda, reports WHOTV.com.

Webber Energy Group at the University of Texas, Austin has a released a video highlighting its recent research, with support from the American Chemistry Council, on converting residue from materials recovery facilities into solid fuel recovery pellets. The pellets are made from 60 percent plastic MRF residue and 40 percent post-industrial paper waste.

St. Petersburg, Florida's recycling program is overpriced, antiquated and insufficient compared to many other cities in the state, according to a report from Kessler Consulting reported on by The Tampa Bay Tribune. The report, commissioned by the local chapter of the League of Women Voters, also found that, of the 50 most populous cities of the Sunshine State, only St. Pete doesn't offer regular curbside pick-up of recyclables. It further noted that residents of the city recover about 122 pounds of trash per household annually through drop-off recycling centers, compared to an average of about 260 pounds for cities that offer curbside collection of recyclable materials.

According to a survey conducted by the National Asphalt Pavement Association under contract to the Federal Highway Administration, record-high levels of recycled materials were used in the construction of new pavements and the use of energy-saving warm-mix asphalt also reached a new high during the 2011 construction season. The survey found that about 66.7 million tons of reclaimed asphalt pavement and 1.2 million tons of reclaimed asphalt shingles were collected in the U.S. during 2011 for use in making pavements.

During the last six years, Winchester, Virginia-based Trex, a maker of maker of composite building products, has kept more than 2.5 billion pounds of plastic and wood scrap out of landfills by using the materials to make decking and railing.

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