NewsBits

NewsBits

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

The most recent effort to pass a bottle bill in Maryland has failed, reports The Baltimore Sun. The legislation was opposed by beverage and retail interests, as well as by the state's counties who would be tasked with operating redemptions centers.

A Tennessee city has backed out of its agreement with RecycleBank, the recycling promotion program. Officials at the City of Alcoa say the recycling program did not attain its subscription goals and that some users were displeased with the rewards system. City managers say the number of local merchants taking part in the RecycleBank effort declined in recent months. Also, the City of Knoxville is considering changes to, or possibly dropping the rewards-based recycling program, given that participation in the incentives program is around 15 percent.

A new report from the Multi-State Mercury Products Campaign and the Product Stewardship Institute has found that a manufacturer-run program aimed at collecting mercury thermostats is failing to keep the toxic metal out of the waste stream and the environment in most states. The industry program has captured 8 percent of mercury thermostats coming out of service in the past decade, according to the report, resulting in the disposal of over 50 tons of the toxin into the environment. The report also faults 10 states with mercury collection laws, with only Maine and Vermont having programs that were more effective than having no program at all.

In St. Petersburg, Florida, Platos Table, a maker of reusable food containers, is spearheading an effort to eliminate polystyrene containers. Over 20 local restaurants have posted decals in their storefront windows signaling to diners that they can bring in their own containers for take-out.

We missed April Fool's Day this year, but we didn't miss this gem from Waste Management World — a machine that takes trash and spins it not just into energy, but into gold. Coming soon to a MRF near you, we're sure.

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