"World's biggest MRF" opens in San Jose

"World's biggest MRF" opens in San Jose

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

The country's second largest waste management company today "flipped the switch" on what it calls the world's largest recycling operation near San Jose, California.

Republic Services, Inc. began operations at its 342-acre Newby Island Recycling Complex, which has a processing capacity of a gaudy 110 tons-per-hour according to the company. The 80,000 square-foot, Milpitas, California facility will process the commercial waste stream for the City of San Jose, California and is expected to divert, overall, at least 80 percent of the material collected. The materials recovery facility will be managing the entire waste stream, with standard recyclables separation and organic material being diverted to the nearby Z-Best Composting Facility in southern Santa Clara County.

Republic partnered with recycling equipment manufacturer Bulk Handling Systems (BHS) to design, manufacture and install the custom-designed, highly-automated system. There are four processing lines: one for residential single-stream materials, a commercial single-stream line, one for processing commercial dry recyclables and a commercial wet materials line. The system also includes a glass clean-up system and a shared container line with seven optical sorting units.

According to BHS, the recovery rate for the facility is expected to exceed 75 percent on the commercial lines and 95 percent on the residential single-stream line. The single-stream residential line has capacity for up to 120,000 tons, per year, of single-stream material.

The organic material diverted by the facility will ultimately be processed at a currently-under-construction anaerobic digestion facility being built by Z-Best owner, Zero Waste Energy Development. The firm will open what it's calling the first commercial-scale dry fermentation anaerobic digestion facility in the U.S. next summer.

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