Resource Recycling Magazine

Updated: 1 hour 33 min ago

Grant watch

Wed, 06/18/2014 - 12:35
Grant watch

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 19, 2014

California offers $1.7 million for tire recycling and Kentucky delivers 49 recycling funding packages worth a combined $2.5 million. Read on to learn the details of those dollars.

CalRecycle is taking on tire recycling throughout the Golden State by offering $1.7 million in grants to municipalities and local waste agencies facing an influx of illegally dumped tires. A total of 23 recipients of funding have been announced, and all the funding will go toward collection, transportation and recycling of the "valuable recyclable feedstock," according to California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery.

Kentucky has given out $2.5 million in 2014-2015 "Kentucky Pride Recycling Grant Awards." Individual grants varied from $3,500 to almost $200,000 and went to 49 local recipients in Kentucky. A related household hazardous waste grant program was also announced, funneling nearly $500,000 to 23 recipients. Grant funding for both programs derives from a $1.75 fee paid to the state for every ton of municipal solid waste headed to landfills.

In Georgia, meanwhile, grant funds have been put to use. More than new recycling bins have been dispersed in eight city parks in the city of Roswell. The additional bins were funded by the public park-specific grant program spearheaded by Keep America Beautiful and the Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group.

California's newly approved state budget for 2014-2015 includes a handful of recycling and composting grants. In addition to restructuring the state's beverage container program, the state will offer $5 million in funding to support recycled product manufacturing, one of several moves lauded by environmental group Californians Against Waste.


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U.K. recycling notebook

Wed, 06/18/2014 - 12:33
U.K. recycling notebook

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 19, 2014

God save the Queen — and the packaging materials. It's Recycling Week across the pond, and to mark the occasion, we cover a number of U.K. headlines.

In conjunction with the U.K.'s Recycle Week 2014, rigid plastics company RPC Group and plastics group Recoup are hosting a live twitter Q-and-A on the recyclability of plastics. The goal of the digital powwow is to combat the prevalent consumer belief that plastics aren't truly recyclable and end up in landfills – it's something the plastic industry is particularly keen on addressing as the U.K. nears imposing 2017 recycling goals.

Almost $1.4 million has become available to fund waste prevention and reuse activities and projects in England. The Innovation in Waste Prevention Fund will make available a series of one-time grants to propel the fund's cause on a local level and will be run by waste reduction advocacy group WRAP. The program was funded and created by the U.K.'s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Despite a string of attempts to boost recycling awareness in the U.K., Coca-Cola Enterprises says more needs to be done to educate the public about the merits of recycling and the recycling process. "There is a bit of mistrust and some misconceptions about what happens to materials once [they leave] your recycling bin," the beverage giant's director of corporate responsibility and sustainability, Joe Francis, said during a recent presentation in London. "There is a huge opportunity to really tell that story in a much more powerful way."

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Programs in action

Wed, 06/18/2014 - 12:31
Programs in action

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 19, 2014

We travel from Maine to Ohio to Hawaii in our look at the latest updates to municipal recycling programs.

Single-stream recycling collection continues to grow. Bangor, Maine is converting from a multi-sort collection and processing system to single-stream service, following the lead of nearby Orono, where recycling volumes rose 54 percent after changing to the more convenient all-in-one-container system. Casella Resource Solutions will collect and process the materials.

In Lakewood, Ohio, city officials have decided to offer single-stream collection service citywide by the end of next year. Presently one-third of eligible households can set out all their recyclables commingled. Lakewood presently pays $44 per ton for waste disposal. In comparison, the city receives as much as $23 per ton for its recovered materials.

Glass container recycling in Honolulu, Hawaii is expected to decline steeply due to recent governmental action. The City had earlier provided financial support to local container redemption centers to also handle non-deposit glass containers. By lowering the subsidy, some observers expect waste-to-energy plant volumes to grow by about 5,000 tons per year because the handling of non-deposit containers is no longer economically feasible. Local redemption centers now refuse to handle the bottles and the city has had to rescind an ordinance requiring local bars and restaurants to set aside containers for recycling. However, local importers of wine and other glass-enclosed products will still pay the state 1.5 cents for each bottle to fund local-government recycling efforts. Some industry experts say the state needs to approve new legislation to up this fee in order to pay for the actual costs of glass container recovery.


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NewsBits

Wed, 06/18/2014 - 12:29
NewsBits

June 19, 2014

More attention worldwide is focusing on the development of large sorting facilities for glass containers. A 275,000-ton per year sorting plant has opened in Antwerp, Belgium to produce cullet in four grades (flint, amber, green and russet). The High5 facility is a partnership of Suez Environnement, the giant waste management firm, and Sibelco, the minerals supplier.

A number of bars and restaurants in Columbus, Ohio are participating in a glass recycling pilot program funded by a $37,000 Ohio EPA grant. The program, which could expand in the near future, asks participating businesses to sort and set aside empty bottles. The containers are picked up by waste and recycling firm Rumpke and eventually resold for use in the manufacture of new bottles and fiberglass insulation.

The Canadian province of Manitoba has beefed up its waste management plan, TomorrowNow, by focusing on diverting more beef and other food scraps. In addition to a handful of additional priorities, the province-wide plan will now offer $1 million in funding to eligible municipal and commercial composting facilities aiming to develop services and operations. The province would like to reach a per-person organics diversion rate of about 200 pounds by 2020.

Waste and recycling firm Recology has been ordered to pay $1.3 million to ratepayers in the San Francisco area. That's the result of a fraud suit brought against the company by a former employee. In a statement, the firm noted it had emerged victorious in the case, noting it had "won on 158 of 159 charges."

Concert organizers at the 2014 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival last week aimed to get attendees as excited about composting as they were about Kanye West's performance. Data has yet to come in, but hopes were high: Organizers wanted to topple last year's mark of collecting 120 tons of organics and compostable products that were then sent to a neighboring farm.

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Future uncertain for Indianapolis recycling

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:22
Future uncertain for Indianapolis recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

Indianapolis may be the next American city to usher in a garbage-sorting MRF, though a number of recycling companies and groups are hoping to push the municipality in a different diversion direction.

The Indianapolis Business Journal reported earlier this week New Jersey-based Covanta has submitted a proposal for the construction of a facility that would accept household waste and then sort out recyclable material (such facilities are often referred to as dirty MRFs).  Residents would be instructed to place all material – trash and recyclables – in a single curbside receptacle.

It would be the first such operation in the U.S. developed by Covanta, a company that currently runs a waste incineration plant in Indianapolis.  However, it would continue what some see as recent nationwide momentum for the "dirty" MRF concept.  Montgomery, Alabama earlier this year unveiled a facility that sorts recyclables from curbside-collected municipal solid waste.  Houston and Cleveland leaders have been debating the merits of the strategy for some time.

The idea of such a strategy gaining traction, however, raises serious alarms for many in the recycling industry.  Detractors argue dirty MRFs yield far less usable material than facilities that take in only recyclables from curbside programs. Opponents to mixed waste facilities also say some materials may not get recovered at all at the operations, and the Indiana Business Journal story in fact indicated the proposed Covanta facility would not sort out glass from the waste stream.

Beth Schmitt, global manager of sustainability and recycling at aluminum manufacturer Alcoa, told Resource Recycling dirty MRFs may not provide Alcoa with clean recycled material.

"While Alcoa applauds all efforts to recycle, we have concerns that a single-stream dirty mixed waste processing facility could cause the aluminum cans to become contaminated by solid waste and hinder the ability to turn them into new cans," she said.  "Aluminum is a valuable component of the circular economy.  Because it does not rust, decay, or lose its quality, it can be recycled repeatedly without loss of properties.  But, in order to truly maximize that value we need to separate materials for recycling."

The Indiana Recycling Coalition (IRC) this April submitted a letter to the office of Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, echoing Schmitt's concerns and requesting a six-month delay on any consideration of Covanta's proposal.

"We believe it would set recycling back in Indianapolis and central Indiana for decades to come, despite providing limited improved recycling rates in the near term," Carey Hamilton, the group's executive director, states in the letter.  "We are confident, based on those of us representing the commodity markets, that the Covanta proposal will provide lower quality and lower quantity material compared to a true curbside recycling program."

In a separate letter sent to Mayor Ballard and obtained by Resource Recycling, Ron Gonen, the CEO of the Closed Loop Fund, proposes the city use a zero-interest loan to invest in and develop curbside recycling.  "Please accept this letter as confirmation that the Closed Loop Fund is interested in providing a zero-interest loan to Indianapolis to support the deployment of a curbside recycling program," the letter reads.

The state of Indiana has set a recycling rate goal of 50 percent and Indianapolis, as the state's largest city, will likely be viewed as a key momentum-builder toward reaching the goal.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2014: Registration now open

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:16
Resource Recycling Conference 2014: Registration now open

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

We cordially invite you to the recycling industry's top gathering of high-level decision-makers. Register today for Resource Recycling 2014, set for September in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Resource Recycling 2014 offers unique networking opportunities, valuable education sessions, a bustling trade show and a number of ancillary meetings hosted by industry associations. Leaders from major recycling stakeholders rely on the annual gathering to push their organizations forward, so make sure your firm or group is well represented.

Resource Recycling 2014 offers unique networking opportunities, valuable education sessions, a bustling trade show and a number of ancillary meetings hosted by industry associations. Leaders from major recycling stakeholders rely on the annual gathering to push their organizations forward, so make sure your firm or group is well represented.

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Will Closed Loop Fund appeal be limited by loans?

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:14
Will Closed Loop Fund appeal be limited by loans?

By Dan Leif, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

The $100 million Closed Loop Fund made ripples throughout the recycling industry when it was announced by a team of corporate giants this spring. What remains to be seen, however, is how attractive the effort's loan structure will be to actual municipalities.

The Closed Loop Fund, which is backed by Walmart, Coca-Cola and a handful of other multinational enterprises, was launched in April and has billed itself as a major corporate response to stagnant American recycling rates. "The goal is to divert valuable raw materials from landfill by helping to provide 100 percent of U.S. consumers access to recycling where and when they need it," the Closed Loop Fund states in an informational brochure it created for stakeholders.

The engine for achieving this? Zero interest loans that will be available to communities so that they can have funding available for bin-to-cart transitions, resident outreach initiatives, facility construction and other projects. In the past when recycling coordinators needed funding outside allocated budgets for those kind of efforts, they turned to municipal bonds as well as grants from state or federal government or nonprofit groups that had corporate backing.

The Closed Loop Fund and its loan strategy offers a very different approach. But some municipal representatives say that being on the hook for repayment simply is not an option for their communities.

"If the elected officials here were going to take on debt, it wouldn't be for recycling," James Jackson, director of public works for Richmond, Virginia, told Resource Recycling.

He noted that his city is in fact looking for a way to move more residents from recycling bins to carts but that Richmond leaders are only willing to make debt commitments to fund the highest priority projects. "We have assessed our needs for road maintenance and have identified well over $230 million worth of road improvement needs just to get us at a place where 80 percent of our roads are at rating of good or better," Jackson said. "That makes it difficult for us to say we want to participate in a zero interest loan program for recycling."

However, other leaders say the zero interest play could work for some communities — especially if the loans come in concert with grants or other financial mechanisms.

Some industry members have indicated a loan would be attractive in stuations where there were already plans to spend a large sum to transition from bins to carts over several years. A loan could allow a community to step away from that staggered structure and make the transition in a single leap.

Scott Mouw, state recycling director at North Carolina Division of Environmental Assistance and Outreach, laid out a slightly different scenario he could see happening in many city council meetings in the coming years: "If the recycling staff walks in and says, 'We need $3 million for carts and this group of industry players is willing to give us a $400,000 grant toward that end and for the rest of it we can get a zero percent loan,' that would be a much easier thing for the City Council to say yes to."

In an interview with Resource Recycling, Closed Loop Fund CEO Ron Gonen said such situations are exactly what his group is seeking. "That's our sweet spot," he said. "We don't want to be the sole source of capital for a city."

He added the Closed Loop Fund, which has not actively started seeking municipal partners yet, views itself as a player that will provide loans of between $1 million and $20 million to fund major initiatives. Ideally, he said, smaller organizations will work to provide grants and other funding alongside the loans. And he said the Closed Loop Fund itself has plans for a grant arm, though the sums flowing out of that part of the initiative will be far smaller than the primary loans.

"Solving the recycling issue requires a lot of pieces coming together," Gonen said.

In communication materials the Closed Loop Fund has issued thus far, it has argued that convincing municipal leaders to embrace loans won't be a difficult sell once those leaders calculate the financial gains loan-based improvements will spark. In its brochure, the Fund notes several examples of how a community could leverage its loans and shows the overall revenue gains those example-cities would see as recycling diversion goes up and landfill tip fees go down.

The Fund's logic dictates that as municipalities start reducing their trash costs and increasing commodity revenue, they'll see loans not as a hindrance but as a long-term investment opportunity.

However, individuals who have experience helping communities devise strategies to lift recycling infrastructure say the cost-savings argument only goes so far when it comes to how cities think about loan payback.

"In our experience communities are going to look at their budgets more holistically," Mouw said. "They're going to look at their loan portfolio and find ways to pay loans they have. But they are unlikely to tie the payback to a specific kind of savings or revenue source. All the money tends to go to the same pool."

But Gonen said the early interest among municipalities indicates there are plenty that feel confident a loan play will work for them. "If there aren't any cities in America that are interested in $100 million in zero interest loans to invest in their recycling programs, that's OK," he said. "However, I can tell you there's way more demand than that just in terms of the calls and emails we've gotten from folks. It's very attractive to cities to be able to borrow at zero interest and have the repayment tied to diversion savings and commodity revenue."

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Cleveland gets educational lift

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:12
Cleveland gets educational lift

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

As part of its ongoing efforts to enhance educational efforts nationwide, a curbside recycling advocacy group is taking its work to Cleveland.

The City of Cleveland will be teaming up with the Curbside Value Partnership (CVP) to "develop and measure a strategic, education campaign designed to increase recycling at the curb," a press release from CVP states. CVP recently announced a similar public-private partnership with the city of San Diego and will collect and analyze data from both projects using its Emerge Knowledge Re-TRAC Connect data management tool.

Cleveland, which already has single-stream recycling in place, is in the midst of switching to an automated recycling program replete with new, large carts. CVP hopes to help ease the transition through its educational assistance.

"Cleveland is clearly dedicated to improving its residential recycling program," Keefe Harrison, CVP's executive director, said in the release. "Making sure residents are aware and empowered to recycle is the crucial next step."

The campaign is expected to be "comprehensive" in scope and "include marketing, advertising, grassroots, community-level outreach and an enhanced Web and social media presence," the release states.

CVP is also in the midst of rolling out its recently announced Recycling Partnership program. Initially spearheaded by the Southeast Recycling Development Council, the partnership is now under CVP's lead and will focus on developing public-private recycling partnerships in municipalities.

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NewsBits

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:08
NewsBits

June 11, 2014

Despite continued state-level interest in diverting food scraps, anaerobic digesters are in short supply. A Wall Street Journal article takes a look at the challenges various states and communities are facing in meeting ordinances and developing the infrastructure needed to sustain long-term food diversion programs.

Is there anything Girl Scouts can't do? This year's winner of the third annual Great Can RoundUp Scout Council Challenge, Girls Scouts of Kansas Heartland, collected an impressive 32,199 pounds of aluminum cans between Jan. 15 and April 30. Winning more than $16,000 as a result, the funds will go toward scout activities and programming in 2014 and beyond.

After an investigation last year found public schools in the city of Pittsburgh were sending sorted recyclables, including cardboard, bottles and cans, to area landfills, a follow-up investigation by CBS affiliate KDKA concludes that school recycling is now "spotty at best." Schools have made in-roads by providing recycling receptacles and collection services to all schools, but the report finds that recycling remains optional despite a local push for mandatory recycling.

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Ontario report: Province is landfilling jobs across the border

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:41
Ontario report: Province is landfilling jobs across the border

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 4, 2014

A study investigating the economic potential of waste diversion in Ontario argues the province should focus on more than just lifting recycling rates — it also needs to stop sending so much material to the U.S.

The report, written by nonprofit research group The Conference Board of Canada on behalf of the Ontario Waste Management Association, extrapolated data from a number of other North American studies to determine that increasing Ontario's overall diversion rate (including residentitial and commercial sources) to 60 percent from its current 23 percent level would lead to an additional 13,000 full-time jobs in the province and increase GDP by $1.5 billion.

The research indicates curbing the export of waste would be a major driver in those economic gains. From 2003 to 2008, the amount of solid waste sent from Ontario to New York landfills increased more than three-fold, according to the report, from 250,000 to 800,000 metric tons. The report also says significant tonnages of recyclables end up being shipped to Michigan for disposal.

"[Policy-makers] should consider the fact that a substantial amount of recyclable materials is exported, rather than processed locally and used to supply domestic manufacturers," the report reads.

The study comes roughly a year after Ontario's environment minister first proposed a revamped policy called the Waste Reduction Act that, among other strategies, opened the door to the expansion of extended producer responsibility (EPR) systems in the province.

The study notes analysis of EPR implementation in other areas shows that those systems can benefit local economies as they increase the tonnages of diverted materials. However, the report also raises a concern about the economics of EPR, arguing that as producers are forced to cover the costs of collection and processing, consumers may end up confronting higher prices when they shop.

"If the resulting increases in prices is substantive," the report states, "it could lead to a reduction in consumption, which could have a negative impact on the economy."

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Resource Recycling Conference 2014: The latest on foodservice packaging recovery

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:40
Resource Recycling Conference 2014: The latest on foodservice packaging recovery

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 4, 2014

Several years ago, the foodservice packaging industry launched the Paper Recovery Alliance and Plastics Recovery Group to increase the recycling and composting of their products.

What progress has been made? At this year's Resource Recycling Conference, The Foodservice Packaging Institute’s Natha Dempsey will share the group's MRF-to-market approach and discuss projects undertaken to overcome the real and perceived barriers to recover more paper and plastic foodservice packaging. Highlights include the results of various food residue studies and a MRF survey on foodservice packaging acceptance. Dempsey will also detail innovative work being done to bolster end markets for recovered materials.

Be a part of this fascinating discussion and many others at Resource Recycling Conference 2014, taking place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Sept. 15-17. Head to rrconference.com for more information on attending, sponsoring and exhibiting.

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Is another EPR program headed to British Columbia?

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:38
Is another EPR program headed to British Columbia?

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

June 4, 2014

British Columbia's hotly debated, producer-led recycling program is only weeks into implementation, but already the seeds of another plan are being planted.

A group called StewardChoice last week announced the specifics of a new program, one which would aim to serve the roughly 100,000 multi-family dwelling units currently not serviced by B.C.'s just-launched extended producer responsibility (EPR) program, Multi-Material B.C. (MMBC).

"Ours would be an option for producers to secure their compliance with recycling regulations," Neil Hastie, development director and spokesperson for StewardChoice Enterprises, Inc., told Resource Recycling. By offering producer-funded services to multi-family homes that are not served by MMBC, Hastie says, the StewardChoice plan will not directly take away from MMBC's roster of participating producers.

"In a way, it will function as a complementary or parallel offering," said Hastie, who is a longtime member of Canada's recycling industry. "We do not ever expect it to be anywhere near the size of the MMBC — this would always be a relatively smaller entry into the packaging and printed paper (PPP) market."

Producers of packaging and printed paper in B.C. are required to fund the collection of at least 75 percent of the material that enters the waste stream each year. MMBC was developed to lead the charge, and it functions as a province-wide organization that represents producers and helps them reach collection goals.

The budding StewardChoice program, which gained inspiration from Germany, where producers have a variety of EPR programs to choose from, could get its start as early as 2015. A draft plan is set to be released later this month, followed by a public consultation period. Eventually, a revised plan will make its way to the Ministry of Environment for official approval as an EPR program for B.C., Hastie said.

A subsidiary of stewardship organization Reclay StewardEdge, StewardChoice estimates 20 percent of the roughly 500,000 multi-family dwelling units are without producer-funded collection.

MMBC's managing director, Allen Langdon, stressed that it was too early to make a judgment on the still-nascent proposal from StewardChoice, but added his group would "welcome lawful competition."

"We look forward to reading … the program plan, once published, and the outcome of the consultations," Langdon told Resource Recycling.

MMBC launched last month after facing opposition from various producer groups, including the newspaper, plastic and grocery industries.

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Programs in action

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:37
Programs in action

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 4, 2014

In this week’s assessment of local recycling initiatives, single-stream recycling is a major focus.

Several communities will switch to all-recyclables collection in the coming months. Charlottesville, Virginia begins its program in July when it will pick up residential materials every other week, using 95-gallon carts. The program will handle more materials than in the past, including the collection of all plastic bottles.

Naperville, Illinois will also move to cart-based single-stream service in September, with Republic Services doing the collection.

Durham County, North Carolina has seen recycling volumes jump 34 percent when single-stream service is offered. As a result, the county will add 7,000 more homes to the program.

Charleston County, South Carolina, meanwhile, has seen its recycling tonnage climb 63 percent in the past four years, due in great part by the county’s switch to fully mixed, cart-based service. Sonoco Recycling processes the materials, with residents paying a $99 per year solid waste fee for recycling.

Brookhaven, New York says volumes have risen 25 percent since implementing all-recyclables collection.

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Patent watch

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:35
Patent watch

June 4, 2014

Patent No. 8,733,682, which describes a shredder of scrap materials, was awarded to Lindner-Recyclingtech GmbH, which is headquartered in Spittal an der Drau, Austria.

A method of tracking recycling rollcarts and bins via RFID technology is the subject of Patent No. 8,738,423, awarded to Armonk, New York's International Business Machines Corporation.

Patent No. 8,735,457 was given to the Columbia Insurance Company, of Omaha, Nebraska, describes different methods and compositions of recycled PET resin.

A method of recycling magnets containing rare earths is the subject of Patent No. 8,734,714 awarded to the U.K.'s University of Birmingham.

TOMRA Systems, headquartered in Asker, Norway, was awarded Patent Application No. 20140147005, which concerns a method and apparatus of preventing fraud in reverse vending machines.

Nottingham, England's Chinook End-Stage Recycling Limited was given Patent Application No. 20140144043 which describes a method of processing solid waste via pyrolysis.

Jerry and Kathy Brownstein, from Issaquah, Washington, were given Patent Application No. 20140137738 which concerns a method of making air filters from post-consumer PET scrap.

A method of processing PET scrap with low impurity levels was given to two researchers from SABIC Innovative Plastics based in Evansville, Indiana and awarded Patent Application No. 20140148514.

Patent Application No. 20140147207 was given to West Jefferson, Ohio-based R. L. Parsons and Son Equipment Company, Inc. for a method of recovering and recycling roadway shoulder material.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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NewsBits

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:34
NewsBits

June 4, 2014

Recycling Reinvented, a group that advocates for more extended producer responsibility strategies, has issued a statement that "salutes" the recent move by Walmart and other corporate giants to inject capital into the national recycling infrastructure. But the statement also explains there are some limitations in the strategy. The brand owner plan, called the Closed Loop Fund, is based on zero interest loans given to municipalities, and Closed Loop administrators have pointed out municipalities will be able to pay back those loans through savings that come as diversion increases and landfill fees fall. But Recycling Reinvented says such logic doesn't add up in communities that contract out garbage collection to private firms.

At University of North Carolina, Charlotte football games this upcoming season, fans will get some much-needed recycling advice from a robot (cue herky-jerky dance moves). Developed by a group of engineering students, the RecycleBot stands three-and-a-half feet tall and will instruct fans to either recycle or compost their gameday food service packaging.

Despite the prevalence of metal theft legislation in all 50 states in the U.S., tracking their effectiveness is proving hard to do, according to the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI). ISRI recenlty partnered with the Council of State Governments (CSG) to study the current laws on the books and found that no state is properly compiling the data necessary to fully analyze what impacts are being made.

In the latest iteration of Keep America Beautiful's "I Want to be Recycled" campaign, the national group has released an arcade-style video game that can be played online. "Super Sorter" makes you, the gamer, the head of a busy materials recovery facility as various materials arrive in need of sortation. Get the proper equipment located at strategic spots on the line or else materials will go unrecovered, revenues will drop and it'll quickly be game over.

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