Resource Recycling Magazine

Updated: 9 hours 15 min ago

Contamination spawns tighter MRF policies in one city

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:18
Contamination spawns tighter MRF policies in one city

By Jared Paben, Resource Recycling

August 25, 2015

An evolving ton with more contamination is one reason the Portland, Ore.-area regional government is moving toward licensing and inspecting MRFs, an official said.

Metro, which is tasked with managing the solid waste system in Oregon's largest urban area, proposes to require licensing of a variety of new facility types, including MRFs handling household recyclable materials. The agency already licenses and inspects C&D sorting facilities and waste transfer stations.

Metro's interest isn't in how the facilities sort and process materials; it's more about ensuring the MRFs don't affect neighboring properties, Roy Brower, Metro solid waste compliance and cleanup director, told Resource Recycling.

A switch to single-stream recycling has contributed to an increase in contamination, and today, MRFs are more akin solid waste processing facilities, he said. They need more people and equipment for sorting recyclable materials from garbage, and their disposal costs have increased.

Some of those facilities store bales attracting rats near residential and public areas, he said.

"The big change really came when the area initially moved to a roll cart system (starting around 2005) – that is when the management of recyclables started to have more of the nuisance, health and environmental risks that characterize other parts of the solid waste stream," Brower said. "There was no specific incident that triggered Metro’s interest in licensing or inspections – but generally the recognition for Metro to play a larger role in assuring the integrity of the entire solid waste system."

Metro's code change, if approved by the agency's elected leaders, could affect nine sorting facilities, including those operated by Far West Recycling, which operates three MRFs in the Portland area, and fiber recovery giants WestRock and Smurfit Kappa Corp.

Metro would work with the affected sorting facilities and the public to develop draft administrative procedures, Brower said.

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Well-funded battery recycling startup breaks ground

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:17
Well-funded battery recycling startup breaks ground

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 25, 2015

A company using a unique technology for extracting lead from lead-acid batteries has begun construction of a $30 million facility in Nevada.

Oakland, Calif.-based startup company Aqua Metals has broken ground on the recycling plant near Reno, Nev., the Reno Gazette-Journal reports.

The company recycles lead from batteries through a proprietary process called "AquaRefining," which uses an electro-chemical process to produce lead from recovered batteries, according to the company's initial public offering (IPO) description. The company raised $33 million in its IPO.

The vast majority of recovered lead-acid batteries are those that come from automobiles.

"AquaRefining offers a significant reduction in production cost over smelting, which is the existing method of producing lead," according to the description. "We also believe that AquaRefining significantly reduces the environmental emissions, health concerns and the permitting, logistics and transport challenges associated with lead smelting."

The U.S. Department of Agriculture provided the company a $42.4 million guaranteed business loan, which the company used to buy land and build the facility, the Reno newspaper reports. A USDA spokeswoman said the company will use the water-based process to remove an estimated 88 tons of lead per day.

The company said it has the potential to locate multiple smaller recycling facilities closer to the sources of used lead-acid batteries, reducing costs.

"The modular nature of AquaRefining makes it possible to start lead production at a much smaller scale than is possible with smelters, thereby significantly reducing the investment risk associated with building a conventional smelter-based lead production facility," according to the company. "Our plan is to actively explore distributed recycling in the U.S. by establishing our own initial recycling operation near Reno, Nevada."

That facility, at the Tahoe Reno Industrial Center, is expected to begin operations in May 2016.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Book your hotel room now

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:16
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Book your hotel room now

August 25, 2015

The Resource Recycling Conference is proud to have chosen the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown as this year's conference venue and host hotel. To receive the discounted conference rate of $179 plus taxes, reservations must be made by Sept. 3, 2015.

Don't delay – ensure you get the best hotel rate possible at the premier conference for recycling industry decision-makers. Book your reservations here.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Austin aims to attract recycling and reuse partners

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:16
Austin aims to attract recycling and reuse partners

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 25, 2015

Austin, Texas is already known as the live music capital of the world. Now it's playing the opening riff in an effort to also become a major center of recycled materials consumption.

Last year, a city project to develop a large industrial park made up of manufacturing businesses that leverage post-consumer materials grabbed a $1 million grant from the U.S. government. And late last week the City began the process of finding those manufacturing partners, opening up a process of accepting letters of interest from potential tenants.

"To reach zero waste in an economically and environmentally sustainable manner, Austin needs companies in our region that can reuse and repurpose the materials we collect," said Bob Gedert, director of Austin Resource Recovery, in a press release. "The companies that locate at the Austin [re]Manufacturing Hub will become part of a growing zero waste ecosystem in Central Texas."

The green-economy industrial park is planned to be just over 100 acres in size. Of that, 10 acres, will be offered for sale and the rest will be leased out by Austin Resource Recovery, the city department that oversees Austin's recycling efforts and is spearheading a program that aims to achieve citywide zero waste by 2040.

According to the city, infrastructure construction is slated to begin at the industrial park in summer 2016, and the first set of tenants will able to start occupying space a year later.

Interested parties can learn more about the project here.

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Scrap exports continue 2015 doldrums

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:14
Scrap exports continue 2015 doldrums

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 25, 2015

Exports of scrap materials continued an overall decline year-over-year, with plastics the sole scrap material that has seen increases for the first half of 2015.

June, the most recent month for which figures are available, saw a month-to-month decrease of 8.8 percent in scrap plastics from May 2015 export levels, with 451.55 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in June 2015. When matched against June 2014 levels, however, the volume of plastic scrap exports was up by 11.4 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports was flat in June, at 17.97 cents per pound, down 2.2 percent from its May 2015 standing. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 7.1 percent.

Through the first six months of 2015, the volume of recovered plastics exported, at 2.39 billion pounds, was up 2.8 percent from its 2014 year-to-date (YTD) figure. At 18.40 cents per pound, the average price through June was down, however, by 5 percent from its 2014 YTD standing.

As for other exported materials, recovered paper exports were flat through the first half of 2015, with 9.92 million metric tons exported, a 2.5 percent increase from June 2014 levels. At $157 per metric ton, the weighted average price of exported recovered paper in June was down YOY, by 2.8 percent.

The 6.90 million metric tons of ferrous scrap exported through June 2015 amounted to a 9.1 percent YOY decrease. At $444 per metric ton, the weighted average price of exported ferrous scrap was down steeply by 16.8 percent from June 2014 levels.

Lastly, the 1.65 billion pounds of aluminum scrap exported through the first half of 2015 equated to a 8.6 percent decrease from the first six months of 2014. At 75 cents per pound, the average price of exported aluminum scrap through June 2015 was down by 2.5 percent YOY.

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Wide world of recycling

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:14
Wide world of recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 25, 2015

A province in Pakistan moves forward with a plan to build the country's second recycling facility, and a huge food festival in Peru plans to recycle 18 tons of plastic food-service ware this year.

Pakistan's Kohat Province is moving forward with a plan to build what would be the country's second recycling facility, according to The Express Tribune. The facility would be capable of processing 550 tons of material per day and manufacture finished plastic products. The total cost is estimated to cost the equivalent of $1.8 million.

A major food festival in Peru plans to recycle 18 tons of plastics this year, and it will donate the proceeds to a nonprofit organization that assists burned children. Peru This Week reports the Mistura 2015 festival will divert plastic utensils, plates and cups from the waste stream and donate the proceeds to the Assistance Association for Burned Children.

Finland-based Valmet announced it is supplying an OptiConcept M containerboard production line to a China-based company. Lee & Man Paper Manufacturing will use the equipment to produce containerboard from 100 percent recycled materials. The project is scheduled to start in fall 2016.

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Patent watch

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:13
Patent watch

August 25, 2015

Vantaa, Finland's MariCap Oy has developed a method of identifying waste and recyclable materials via RFID tagging systems for simpler sortation and was awarded Patent No. 9,090,399.

Pescara, Italy's Fater S.P.A. has developed a method and apparatus for processing diapers and other absorbent products and was given Patent No. 9,095,853.

A method of tracking and recovering the waste produced at fast-food restaurants is the subject of Patent No. 9,098,884, given to a group of researchers led by David Borowski, from Green Bay, Wis.

Sandvik Intellectual Property AB, headquartered in Sandviken, Sweden, was awarded Patent No. 9,101,960 for a method of sorting hard metals for recovery via heat.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database at patft.uspto.gov.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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One local program will grab $5,000 at Resource Recycling Conference 2015

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:12
One local program will grab $5,000 at Resource Recycling Conference 2015

August 25, 2015

At next month's Resource Recycling Conference in Indianapolis, The Recycling Partnership will be offering a workshop to help local programs get the info they need to effectively transition to cart-based collection. One program will also walk away with a $5,000 grant to make such action financially feasible.

The grant will go to one motivated attendee of the nonprofit organization's workshop, which will be held Monday, Sept. 28 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown. The session is free to attendees of the Resource Recycling Conference. Register for the workshop when you complete your conference registration form.

Click here learn more about The Recycling Partnership workshop and see the full slate of training opportunities held on Sept. 28, the first day of the conference.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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NewsBits from Resource Recycling

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:10
NewsBits

August 25, 2015

It's not often recycling ends up on TV, but even less often it's featured on a reality show, let alone two seasons of one. But that's where TerraCycle, a company specializing in recycling hard-to-recycle materials, has found itself. The New York Times takes a look behind the scenes of season two of "Human Resources."

Chicagoans in single-family residents have their garbage collection services paid by their property taxes, while multi-family building residents pay fees for service. Now, in an effort to raise money, city leaders are considering charging households for solid waste collection services, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

Rubicon Global hired a former executive for Walmart and RecycleBank as its chief financial officer, and the company has signaled interest in going public in the future, according to Fortune.com. Rubicon Global's software allows haulers to bid to collect materials for disposal and recycling from large companies. It's also working to launch an app for on-demand collection.

The National Journal has a feature about how the enforcement officer in Malden, Mass. works to track down and ticket individuals who try to avoid extra costs in the municipality's pay-as-you-throw system.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a method of recycling lead from old car batteries into new solar cells. Iflscience.com reports each car battery could provide enough material for solar panels to serve 30 American families.

Politico casts a favorable glance at waste-to-energy facilities as a solution to managing the country's waste and providing "sustainable energy." The website's feature focuses on a waste-to-energy facility in Minneapolis burning a sizable percentage of the county's trash, with very little on the impact to recycling.

Contamination is kicking an already down recycling industry, Wired.com reports. The publication explores how Americans are overly optimistic about what can be recycled and are throwing items like plastic bags and Christmas lights in the bin, but that further lowers the prices haulers and MRF operators get for the material. Resource Recycling's Jerry Powell tells the publication the government will be on the hook to help pay operating costs when commodity prices fall short.

One hauler in Southern California isn't helping itself when it comes to contamination in the single-stream recycling stream. KESQ.com reports a neighbor in Palm Desert, Calif. has recorded video of crews dumping garbage from a bin into the recyclable materials compartment on a truck.

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Industry and supplier news

Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:07
Industry and supplier news

August 25, 2015

Kessler Consulting has been selected to develop a Zero Waste Principles and Practices course and certification program, a project led by the Solid Waste Association of North America and the California Resource Recovery Association. For more, click here.

Machinex Technologies announced the grand re-opening of an upgraded MRF owned by Denver-area Alpine Waste and Recycling. For more, click here.

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Advocacy groups argue over packaging EPR

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 22:07
Advocacy groups argue over packaging EPR

By Jared Paben, Resource Recycling

August 18, 2015

Extended producer responsibility for toxic materials makes sense, participants in a recent webinar agreed. But whether – and how – to extend EPR to packaging in the U.S. was the subject of a fierce debate.

"We do not need EPR for packaging, materials we're already recycling," said Neil Seldman, co-founder of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR).

Matt Prindiville, executive director of EPR advocacy organization group Upstream, disagreed.

"It's purely a way to get producer funding into the recycling system," Prindiville said.

The ILSR-hosted webinar, which drew 69 people, included presentations from Seldman and Prindiville. It was moderated by Maurice Sampson II, president and CEO of Philadelphia-based Niche Recycling.

Prindiville presented on Upstream's model legislation, drafted this spring, establishing what he called a "shared responsibility approach." Packaging producers would provide money to a trust, which would aim for a 75 percent recycling rate by spending the money to improve recycling infrastructure, compensate local governments for collection costs and conduct outreach. The trust would be governed by a board with representation from packaging producers, solid waste agencies, collectors, manufacturers using recyclable materials and environmental groups.

"This is really about getting producer funding into the system and having those funds being administered by the type of folks on this call," Prindiville said.

Unlike a fully producer-controlled system for packaging, Upstream's approach avoids creating a producer-controlled organization or consortium that can upend existing business relationships between local governments and haulers or create turmoil in markets, he said.

"While it doesn't go far enough for some, it provides a politically viable path forward in the U.S.," Prindiville said.

Seldman saw the bill differently.

The effort to extend EPR to packaging interferes with a thriving "zero waste" movement, he said. EPR systems, according to Seldman, shut out citizen involvement, and he pointed to the Connecticut mattress recycling law as a case in point.

"The revolution in solid waste management in the U.S. took place because citizens changed the rules at the local level," Seldman said. "Their efforts ushered in resource recovery parks, bottle bills, minimum-recycled-content laws, bans on bags and expanded polystyrene products and disposal bans for yard debris."

"These are the types of things – these small but cumulative things – that corporate America does not want to see happen, and EPR is the way to do that," he said. "It's a way to corporate bureaucratic responsibility, instead of citizen and local government responsibility."

Dick Lilly, formerly of Seattle Public Utilities' Solid Waste Division, and Mary Lou Van Deventer and Dan Knapp, both of Berkeley, Calif.-based company Urban Ore, also provided additional commentary on EPR for packaging following the presentations.

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WestRock snaps up SP Fiber Holdings

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 22:07
WestRock snaps up SP Fiber Holdings

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 18, 2015

WestRock Co. has agreed to purchase recycled fiber company SP Fiber Holdings, continuing a recent spate of paper industry mergers and consolidations.

WestRock – itself the product of a recent merger between two industry giants, RockTenn and MeadWestvaco – will pay $288.5 million to acquire SP Fiber Holdings, the company announced Aug. 11. The deal is subject to regulatory approval.

SP Fiber Holdings produces recycled containerboard and kraft and bag paper at mills located in Dublin, Ga. and Newberg, Ore. The company makes 100 recycled fiber products for end use in consumer and corrugated packaging.

As part of the deal, WestRock also acquires SP Fiber's 48 percent stake in a renewable energy joint venture called Green Power Solutions of Georgia, which provides energy to Georgia Power and steam to SP Fiber's paper mill in Dublin.

"The Dublin and Newberg mills will balance the fiber mix of our mill system, and the addition of kraft and bag paper will diversify our product offering," WestRock CEO Steve Voorhees stated in the announcement. "We expect to apply our operating capabilities to improve the cost structure of both mills. As a result, our mill system will be better positioned to serve the increasing demand for lighter weight containerboard and kraft paper."

WestRock is the second largest paper and paperboard firm in North America, behind International Paper. It already operates recycled paper mills in 10 states in the eastern half of the country and it recovers and recycles roughly 7 million tons of fiber per year.

SP Fiber Technologies says it has 556 employees and produces 2,200 tons of packaging and 500 tons of newsprint per day.

A WestRock spokeswoman said the company doesn't comment on the negotiations of any transaction.

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Getting killed by contamination? Find help at Resource Recycling Conference 2015

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 22:06
Getting killed by contamination? Find help at Resource Recycling Conference 2015

August 18, 2015

Put recyclable materials in; keep the trash out. That call from recycling coordinators, MRF operators and others who depend on cart contents has recently grown in intensity as commodity prices have squeezed profits and single-stream collection has expanded.

At Resource Recycling Conference 2015, expert speakers representing a range of stakeholders will take to the stage to help attendees address contamination in innovative and productive ways. The session's scheduled lineup includes Derric Brown of the Carton Council and Evergreen Packaging; Susan Robinson of Waste Management; Harvey Gershman of consulting firm Gershman, Brickner & Bratton; and Samantha MacBride of the New York City Department of Sanitation.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Current export markets: The good and the ugly

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 22:00
Current export markets: The good and the ugly

By Jerry Powell, Resource Recycling

August 18, 2015

Several trends are negatively affecting North American export markets for recovered materials, including the return of detailed material inspections by Chinese customs officials.

The surprise move by the Chinese government to devalue its currency – the yuan – has led to consternation by North American recycling shippers. The devaluation of the yuan makes the U.S. dollar even stronger. Thus, while the government action will make Chinese goods more attractive worldwide, it means that paper, plastic and metals recovered in the U.S. and Canada are more expensive than before devaluation, because such goods are dollar-denominated.

The currency action will spur added Chinese initiatives to acquire more scrap material internally, rather than relying so heavily on North American and European suppliers. Recycling market players fear that additional devaluation steps will further erode import demand by Chinese buyers and will push foreign-trade prices lower.

A second concern of many North American shippers is the resurgence in restrictive actions by Chinese custom inspectors. Some U.S. shippers of secondary materials say they are experiencing enhanced inspections of their loads as the Chinese government once again tightens controls to reduce or eliminate the likelihood of contaminated loads being received. Some U.S. exporters are calling the governmental action “Green Fence II.”

On the positive side, these same exporters say overseas shipping costs are at rock-bottom levels. According to ocean-freight analysts, these attractive container shipping rates reflect the low cost of fuel for shipping lines as well as the impact of a rate war among the major shipping lines.

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APR makes rigid plastics pitch to grocery industry

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 21:59
APR makes rigid plastics pitch to grocery industry

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 18, 2015

Grocery store chains could generate significant income by baling and selling their rigid plastic containers, according to a video aimed at grocery leaders.

The training video emphasizes the benefits of baling and selling HDPE and PP rigid containers, as opposed to landfilling them, mixing them in single-stream recycling or stacking and shipping them for recycling. It notes that a grocery chain with 100 outlets could bring in rigid plastics revenues of nearly $120,000 annually. 

The video was produced by the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR) in collaboration with Florida-based Publix Super Markets and the American Chemistry Council.

"There is great value in grocery store plastics," Liz Bedard, director of the APR Rigid Plastics Recycling Program, stated in a press release. "The Grocery Store Recycling Project is all about capturing good material for recycling. Baling the material adds good economic value, and we want to make it easy for grocers to see how they can enhance the value of the material by baling it."

The video features practices at Publix, a Southeastern U.S. grocery chain of 1,100 stores that bales its rigid plastics. The video also highlights the financial benefits of using a horizontal baler.

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Federal legislation aims to complement Closed Loop Fund

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 21:57
Federal legislation aims to complement Closed Loop Fund

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

August 18, 2015

The dollar amount in a zero waste bill in Congress was inspired by the Closed Loop Fund's pledge to invest $100 million in recycling initiatives.

That's according to staff members for U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, a Minneapolis-area Democrat who introduced the Zero Waste Development and Expansion Act (H.R. 3237) in late July.

The bill would establish a grant fund to distribute up to $100 million to municipalities over five years to support waste reduction, recycling and reuse. Ellison staffers say the dollar amount was inspired by the privately funded Closed Loop Fund, which has said it will contribute $100 million in loans to communities and businesses. The idea is to provide a public sector match to the private sector funds.

The bill could face a battle in Congress. Bill supporters will try to convince fiscally conservative Republicans the investment will be paid back with increased jobs and business activity and additional tax revenues. Even if passed, the bill would still need to be funded by Congress.

The bill, which would authorize an appropriation of up to $100 million for fiscal years 2016 through 2021, received kudos from recycling and reuse advocates, including the Reuse Institute.

"We support all efforts to divert reusable materials away from the waste stream and commend Rep. Ellison for putting forth this game-changing legislation," Reuse Institute CEO MaryEllen Etienne told Resource Recycling. "The bill's focus on empowering local governments to establish waste prevention, reuse and recycling infrastructure is paramount to its success. It's especially vital to the reuse industry as these companies tend to be small, locally owned and operated and provide local jobs and increase regional capital retention."

Rob Kaplan, managing director of the Closed Loop Fund, said the organization can't comment on pending legislation because the fund receives a small portion of its committed capital from foundations.


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Wide world of recycling

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 21:55
Wide world of recycling

August 18, 2015

A Taiwanese designer makes strides in recyclable footwear. That story and more can be found in the latest update from our content partner Recycling International.

Aurubis, the world’s largest copper recycling company, has returned "very good" operating earnings of 261 million euros (before taxes) for the first nine months of fiscal year 2014-15; this compares to 75 million euros in the corresponding period of 2013-14.

Axion Polymers in the U.K. has invested significantly in new laboratory and testing facilities to ensure consistent quality of its solid recovered fuel (SRF) products and satisfy the stringent standards of its technical end markets.

A designer in Taiwan has created an innovative piece of composite-free footwear with the help of a 3-D printer. Known as the Bio-Knit shoe, it should "dramatically reduce" the costs associated with recycling current multi-material products, according to its developer.

According to Dutch railway company ProRail, the number of copper theft incidents in the Netherlands fell drastically in the first half of this year when compared with the same period in 2014. A total of 54 cases of copper theft have been reported this year versus 130 in the first six months of 2014.

The Hong Kong government has launched an Advisory Committee on Recycling Fund together with China's Environment Bureau. The new initiative will oversee a $130 million fund intended to stimulate recycling in the autonomous territory.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Get your brand in front of the industry

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 21:54
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Get your brand in front of the industry

August 18, 2015

Sponsorship and exhibitor packages are now available for the leading North American gathering of top-level recycling professionals.

By integrating your company into the action at the Resource Recycling Conference, you'll be ensuring brand recognition among local government decision-makers, packaging executives, association heads and other sustainability leaders. Be sure to act quickly to secure the best possible exhibit hall placement and sponsorship choices.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is scheduled for Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Downtown Marriott in Indianapolis. Head to rrconference.com for all the latest on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Newsbits from Resource Recycling

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 21:51
NewsBits

August 18, 2015

The Economic Development Partnership of Alabama has awarded the City of Montgomery and its mixed-waste processing facility the "2015 Alabama Innovation Award for Outstanding Public Private Partnership." WSFA reports the IREP facility created more than 100 local jobs and is able to "divert 60 percent of the city's material from landfill."

That same facility in Montgomery is also the subject of a highly critical website – savemonckscorner.com – that has made the rounds in recycling circles this week, claiming that the IREP facility lost millions of dollars in its first year of operations.

The City of Atlanta has launched a partnership with recycling incentive program Recycling Perks, according to the Atlanta Daily World. The program provides residents who recycle with discounts at businesses.

Residents in Albuquerque, N.M. recovered 9 percent more material over the past year, but it still falling short of a target in its contract with a MRF operator, the Albuquerque Journal reports. The City diverted 34,000 tons, but it's still short of a target in the contract, requiring it to pay penalties to Friedman Recycling.

The phone book industry is making improvements in sustainability, but it's still falling short in some areas, according to a report from the Product Stewardship Institute. The 2015 Sustainability Report Card of Telephone Directory Publishers evaluates 13 publishers on whether they provide easy access to opt-out programs, use sustainable paper and ink and provide support for recycling programs.

Twin Cities-area nonprofit organization Eureka Recycling is organizing a summit to strengthen the zero waste movement. The event, which will draw 18 experts and innovators to speak, will be held Sept. 18 in Minneapolis. Tickets can be purchased here.

Safeway has joined a program to provide the Oregon Food Bank with food that's past its sell-by date but is still safe to eat, according to the Portland Business Journal. The grocery store will join the Fresh Alliance Program, resulting in an estimated 1.25 million meals per year for low-income residents of Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Single-stream recycling has boosted curbside volumes in Chattanooga, Tenn., but glass continues to be used as alternative daily cover, not recycled into other products, according to the Times Free Press. The local MRF can't find a market for the curbside-collected glass, although it does store and sell presorted glass dropped off at collection depots.

A U.S. Senate committee approved a bill protecting paper recycling from energy recovery when the Department of Energy awards funds to developing energy technology, according to the Paper Recycling Coalition. The Energy and Natural Resource Committee approved an amendment to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 because of increasing concerns about the quality of fiber going to MRFs co-located with waste-to-energy facilities.

Oregonians support the doubling of the beverage container deposit from 5 cents to 10 cents, a survey from the Northwest Grocery Association shows. That's according to the Statesman Journal newspaper, which reported 55 percent of poll respondents support the increase. Under Oregon law, if redemptions fall below 80 percent two years in a row, regulators can increase the deposit starting in 2017.

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Industry and supplier news

Mon, 08/17/2015 - 21:50
Industry and supplier news

August 18, 2015

The Solid Waste Association of North America and the California Resource Recovery Association will develop and offer a Zero Waste Principles and Practices course and certification program in the U.S. and Canada. For more, click here.

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries has passed a policy on anti-metals-theft laws requiring recycling companies to electronically submit reports to government officials regarding sales information. For more, click here.

Consumer personal care products company Kimberly-Clark Professional has signed on as a benefactor member of the U.S. Composting Council. For more, click here.

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