E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 1 day 9 hours ago

Sims sees spike in e-scrap profitability

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 23:01
Sims sees spike in e-scrap profitability

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 19, 2015

Financial figures for July through December 2014 indicate Sims Metal Management's recent e-scrap consolidation appears to be paying off.

Publicly traded Sims netted nearly $9.8 million of its estimated $71 million profit for the half-year period from its global e-scrap recycling operations. While the $313 million in revenue from e-scrap sales was down about 5 percent compared with the July-December 2013 split, profitability was non-existent in that span and the latest profits represent "the highest in two years."

Sims Recycling Solutions is the electronics recycling arm of Australia-based Sims Metal Management.

"Stronger earnings were due to elevated performance from Continental Europe and reduced losses incurred from recently exited operations. Performance of this segment is expected to continue to improve as the benefits of the optimisation program flows through into the results," the company's synopsis on the sector reads.

The company announced plans last year to close all of its e-scrap plants in Canada and consolidate operations in the U.K. The move followed closures of Sims' e-scrap facilities in New Jersey and Texas.

During the July-December 2014 stretch, the company cut down on its e-scrap workforce by almost 21 percent. The company's assets fell by 18 percent during the period.

The company has a goal reaching $250 million in profit before taxes and interest by its 2017-2018 reporting period.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 22:58
Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 19, 2015

North America's largest plastics recycling conference, taking place next week, will offer some useful knowledge and networking opportunities to e-scrap players.

Plastics Recycling 2015 will offer an exclusive first look at In-depth research on the plastics recovered from scrap electronics. This original data-compiling project investigates where e-plastic discards are being generated and where they’re going once they are processed.

A critical analysis of e-plastics consumption, recovery and recycling will be offered, and it will be accompanied by strategies that firms can employ to overcome e-plastic profitability challenges.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to www.plasticsrecycling.com for information on attending.


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Southeast processing firm accused of landfilling CRT glass

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 22:54
Southeast processing firm accused of landfilling CRT glass

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Feb. 19, 2015

Diversified Recycling has been slammed by the Basel Action Network for allegedly sending glass to a downstream partner that dumped the material at a local landfill. The company is also accused of selling broken devices online.

Following a month-long investigation of Diversified's Norcross, Georgia facility, the Basel Action Network (BAN) announced today Diversified has been suspended for two years from applying to the e-Stewards certification standard due to the alleged activities. BAN is the creator of the e-Stewards standard.

Diversified's Orlando, Florida processing facility was on the verge of becoming certified to the e-Stewards standard when an inaccurate financial report and online electronics sales activity prompted BAN and e-Stewards officials to look into the company's downstream activities in Georgia, which was also aiming to be certified.

According to BAN, the investigation found Diversified had sent CRT glass to Sarah's Trading, which went on to crush and landfill the glass at a nearby construction and demolition debris landfill not authorized to take the leaded glass.

It is unknown how much glass was sent from Diversified to Sarah's, and it's also unclear exactly how long that downstream arrangement was in place.

"It could be massive amounts that ended up in that landfill," Jim Puckett, executive director of BAN, told E-Scrap News. "It seemed very willful. If they had come to us and said, 'We just realized one of our downstreams is really problematic,' that would have been extremely different."

The BAN report also alleges Diversified had been selling used electronics online without proper assurances that they were tested and in working order. In one particular case, Diversified is accused of sending a large quantity of non-working devices to Hong Kong after stating those electronics were functional.

Diversified CEO Bruce Mannseur responded to the announcement in a statement sent to E-Scrap News. He defended the company's actions and argued it was misled by Sarah's Trading.

"Diversified Recycling hereby officially denies all knowledge of the allegations as set forth in the Basel Action Network’s recent publication," the statement reads. "Diversified Recycling was given assurances by Sarah’s Trading that they in fact would adhere to the applicable laws, rules and regulations pertaining to the proper handling and disposal of the cathode ray tube glass. Diversified Recycling takes its responsibilities as an electronics recycler very seriously and has always maintained a strong commitment and a strict adherence to all local, state and federal environmental laws."

Sarah's Trading did not respond to numerous requests for comment. It is not known if the firm is still in operation, though its website is still active.

The BAN report indicates Sarah's moved the CRT glass to construction and demolition debris site Safeguard Landfill Management in Fairburn, Georgia. Representatives from Safeguard did not respond to a request for comment.

The Atlanta office of EPA Region 4 is now handling the case but would not comment on its status.

Diversified's Orlando facility had been certified to the R2:2008 standard until Dec. 31 but has yet to become re-certified under the updated R2:2013 standard. The company's Norcross site has never been certified to either R2, a point the certification's administrator, SERI, pointed out in a press release issued in response to BAN's report.

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Spanish firm expects to take in 67,000 tons of US CRT glass

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 22:50
Spanish firm expects to take in 67,000 tons of US CRT glass

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Feb. 19, 2015

A Spanish company supplying CRT glass to the European ceramics industry has been seeing glass tonnages from the U.S. steadily increase.

In an update sent to E-Scrap News, JJ Santos of Camacho Recycling says demand in the European ceramic tile industry for both panel and funnel glass is "increasing more and more."

Moreover, he expects Camacho will receive more than 67,000 tons of CRT glass from the U.S. in 2015. Glass tonnages, according to Santos, will also start arriving from Canada this month.

The company made waves at the E-Scrap Conference last October after presenting on its business model, which boasts competitive pricing despite being far from U.S. processors. It's also a rare example of a CRT glass processing operation that's already in operation and is permitted to take and recycle U.S. CRT glass.

One U.S. company that's begun sending glass to Camacho is Global Environmental Services (GES). As part of GES' new contract to process Kentucky's governmental e-scrap, the firm will be sending glass to Camacho for use in the tiles.

The overall process has received support from the U.S. EPA as a legitimate recycling option for CRT glass processors.

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Certification scorecard

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 22:48
Certification scorecard

Feb. 19, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Adirondack Mobile Shredding of Schroon Lake, New York; LionCage of Kew Gardens, New York; Norfolk Disposal of Waterford, Ontario; Northwest Shredders LLC of Woodward, Oklahoma; Security Data Destruction, Inc. of Phoenix; and Shred Quick of Bradenton, Florida have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.


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NewsBits

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 22:47
NewsBits

Feb. 19, 2015

EcoATM has collected more than 4 million cell phones, tablets and MP3 players through its automated electronics recycling kiosks, according to the company. As of December 2014, ecoATM kiosks were located in 1,890 locations in 49 states. EcoATM also announced its co-founder, Mark Bowles, will take on a new role with the company as senior vice president of innovation.

Waste Management processed 35,000 tons of e-scrap in 2013, according to its 2014 sustainability report. The e-scrap processed included 1.4 million cell phones, 90,000 laptops and 4,000 tablets.

Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries recently released a video showing the contributions shredding technologies have had on the recycling industry. The 13-minute video shows shredders in action and discusses how they’ve revolutionized a number of recycling processes.

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Industry & supplier news

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 22:43
Industry & supplier news

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 19, 2015

E-scrap processor 3S International is finding that partnerships with other companies are yielding benefits for all of them, according to a press release. The Michigan-based company, which specializes in processing LCDs on a large scale, has recently partnered with IMS Electronics. “This partnership allows us to provide the best downstream for our clients’ LCD and mercury-containing devices," said Linda McFarland of IMS Electronics. "There is a huge benefit to electronics recyclers to open doors for each other." Through partnering with IMS and other firms – such as Kuusakoski Recycling, Sims Recycling Solutions and Valley City Electronic Recycling – companies share resources and collection methods and materials are shipped to the company that can best recycle them, according an accompanying op-ed.

Leaders of the e-Stewards e-scrap environmental standard have launched the e-Stewards Consultant Registry Program. Through the program, consultants pre-approved by e-Stewards can link with firms "who need support in preparing for e-Stewards certification audits, training and other valuable services." Get more information here.

IFixit.org now has more repair guides for Android devices than it does for Apple devices, the nonprofit organization has announced. It has repair manuals for 252 different Android devices, compared with 186 Apple-oriented guides. The online electronics repair hub distributes repair information and parts to allow for the repair and reuse of personal electronics. For more, click here.



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Oregon fines e-scrap firm, alleging stormwater violations

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 22:02
Oregon fines e-scrap firm, alleging stormwater violations

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

Feb. 13, 2015

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has fined e-scrap recycling company EG Metals more than $12,000, with regulators saying the company violated its stormwater permit. The company denies the allegations and claims the penalty isn’t warranted.

The state fined EG Metals for two reasons, according to a notice of penalty: An October 2014 inspection revealed the firm exposed processed scrap materials to the elements by storing it directly on pavement and in uncovered boxes, and it failed to test stormwater from the property the required four times during the year.

During water-quality tests in 2013 and 2014, stormwater from the site exceeded limits for copper, lead and zinc, and the uncovered scrap electronic materials may have been the source, according to a Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) press release.

In a request for a hearing obtained by E-Scrap News, an attorney representing the company admitted that stormwater was only tested three times, not four, but wrote that a penalty shouldn’t be assessed.

The attorney, Donald Koehler, also wrote that at the time of the inspection in October 2014, the processed e-scrap was not left uncovered, as alleged, and the material was in the process of being bagged and placed in leak-proof containers.

That allegation is already the subject of a previous – and still contested – DEQ penalty, he wrote, calling it “an additional penalty for the same alleged violation.”

DEQ raised concerns about the storage of e-scrap at the Hillsboro, Oregon facility in September 2013, when inspectors noted an unprocessed e-scrap stockpile and a pile of processed electronics exposed to the elements. At that time and later, the company’s general manager and vice president of operations told E-Scrap News EG Metals was working to make changes to address DEQ’s issue regarding protecting materials from the elements.

Kieran O’Donnell, DEQ environmental law specialist, told E-Scrap News that before scheduling a hearing in front of an administrative law judge, the parties will hold an informal meeting to answer questions and attempt to reach agreement.

EG Metals is headquartered in Oregon with a regional office in Dallas.

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Arrow Electronics purchases UK e-scrap company

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 21:53
Arrow Electronics purchases UK e-scrap company

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 13, 2015

Arrow Electronics will bolster its e-scrap collection, data erasure, refurbishment, resale and recycling presence in Europe through the purchase of a U.K.-based company.

Arrow purchased RDC, a subsidiary of technology supplier Computacenter UK, for about $84 million, according to a company press release. RDC collects e-scrap, erases sensitive data and resells the electronics or recycles the scrap.

The move is another in a string of purchases Arrow Electronics has made in recent years of e-scrap refurbishment and recycling companies, including Asset Recovery Corp., Intechra, Redemtech and TechTurn Ltd. Most of that acquisition activity came in 2011 and 2012. Until the RDC purchase, Arrow had of late been quiet on the mergers and acquisitions front.

“This acquisition further broadens Arrow’s value recovery business in Europe,” Michael J. Long, chairman, president and CEO of Arrow, stated in a press release. “RDC will allow us to better address the growing requirements of our global customers.”

As part of the purchase, Computacenter UK has agreed to outsource value recovery services it provides to its customers to Arrow for five years.

Computacenter’s CEO told The Register that the board wasn’t looking to sell its recycling arm but got an offer that was too good to turn down, and that the company didn’t see RDC’s services as its core.

RDC processed 2.2 million used IT devices in 2013 and was the largest IT asset disposal company in Europe, according to Computacenter.

Arrow’s value recovery processing takes place in a total of 1.4 million square feet of space in eight countries, according to the company. It processes 7.2 million electronics each year.


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West Coast port dispute slows movement of recyclables

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 21:50
West Coast port dispute slows movement of recyclables

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Feb. 13, 2015

Contract negotiations between West Coast dock workers and their employers have appeared to hit a boiling point, leaving recyclable materials in need of export stuck in ports – and potentially bound for landfills.

Since May 2014, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) have been attempting to reach a long-term contract. Those negotiations continued into late October, and at that point ILWU "began to stage devastating slowdowns up and down the coast," PMA alleges. The dispute has caused major delays in overseas cargo shipments, including those carrying recycled materials.

Scott Horne, vice president of government affairs at the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), told E-Scrap News the dispute is hurting recycling-related business that are already battling a tough economic climate.

"With falling commodity prices, recyclers are already having a tough enough time," Horne said. "The ports slowdown is now an additional obstacle to markets that do exist. Scrap is the top export by volume out of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and roughly $9.4 billion in scrap passes out of West Coast ports every year. A complete shutdown would have a crippling effect on the industry and cost American jobs."

Meanwhile, the West Coast Refuse and Recycling Coalition, representing California, Oregon and Washington recycling businesses and waste haulers, sent out a letter to members Jan. 30 urging action and noting the potential negative impacts of a prolonged dispute.

"The continued slowdown at West Coast port terminals is having serious implications upon our industry’s ability to fulfill our contractual obligations designed to achieve maximum recycling and waste diversion goals for the municipalities we serve," the coalition wrote. "Without immediate relief, we may soon be forced to begin redirecting this material to extended storage and disposal, undermining the very goal of our material management operations."

In addition, San Francisco's KTVU News recently reported waste and recycling company Recology is quickly amassing stocks of cardboard and paper awaiting export to Asian paper mills. The California Refuse Recycling Council has also sent a letter to California Gov. Jerry Brown, urging action on the dispute.

Far West Recycling's president, Keith Ristau, told Resource Recycling the Oregon-based company was sitting on 7,200 tons of material "all due to the slowdown."

In the latest development on negotiations, PMA announced plans to "temporarily suspend premium-pay weekend and holiday vessel operations" today and from Feb. 14-16. Ports were also suspended last weekend as a result of the unresolved contract negotiations.

PMA announced Feb. 4 a new contract offer to ILWU "goes as far as we believe we can go." According to an accompanying video message from PMA president Jim McKenna, the offer raises the annual average salary of full-time ILWU workers to more than $160,000 (from $147,000) and raises the maximum pension to nearly $89,000 (from $80,000). The five-year offer also continues to provide health insurance at no cost to ILWU employees.

“I hope the ILWU leadership will give very serious consideration to this contract offer, which I believe respects their members and gives us a clear path to conclude these talks," McKenna said during a conference call with reporters last week. "We owe it to workers and businesses across the nation to resolve our differences and get our ports moving again.”

ILWU president Robert McEllrath, meanwhile, issued a strongly worded retort to McKenna's characterization that the port could be headed for collapse, and he called on workers to "stay at the negotiating table and work through a few remaining issues," McEllrath said. "We are very close to reaching an agreement."

Craig Merrilees, ILWU's communications director, told Resource Recycling on Friday that "only a few outstanding issues remain" and stated the two parties "are very, very close" to an agreement.

While Merrilees would not divulge specific issues in need of resolution before an agreement can be met, he said they can be "easily resolved." He added, "We just need to get it done."

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Patent watch

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 21:44
Patent watch

Feb. 13, 2015

Patent No. 8,951,331 was given to Tokyo-based Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. Ltd. for a method of recycling different types of batteries.

Sumitomo was also awarded Patent Application No. 20140345422 for lithium-ion battery recycling.

Patent Application No. 20150007748 was given to Peoria, Illinois-based Peoria Disposal Company for a method of treating CRT glass to make the lead content inert and used as alternative daily cover for landfills.

Billings, Montana-based Stillwater Water Company was awarded Patent Application No. 20140373684, concerning a method of recovering precious metals.

Steven E. Sloop, from Bend, Oregon, was awarded Patent Application No. 20140377597, which describes a method of recycling lithium-ion batteries.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Certification scorecard

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 21:41
Certification scorecard

Feb. 13, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Technology Recyclers LLC of Indianapolis is now certified to the R2:2013 and RIOS standards.

A1 Shredding and Recycling, Inc. of Marietta, Georgia; Action Shred of Texas LLC of Dallas; American Security Shredding, Inc. of Candler Road, North Carolina; Citishred LLC of St. Louis; Columbus Secure Document Solutions of Salt Lake City; Document Resources a Division of Underground Vaults & Storage, Inc. of Kansas City, Missouri; Document Security Solutions of Perris, California; Gone For Good Shredding of Little Rock, Arkansas; NEXCUT Shredding of Teaneck, New York; Northeast Data Destruction LLC of Mansfield, Massachusetts; Pena’s Disposal Inc. of Cutler, California; Phoenix Recycling Inc. of Winnipeg, Manitoba; Rock Solid Shredding of Little Rock, Arkansas and Shred Doc Destr dba Balcones Shred of Dallas have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Secure e-Cycle of Kansas City, Kansas has renewed its NAID Certifications for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization Operations and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.


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NewsBits

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 21:39
NewsBits

Feb. 13, 2015

The Coalition for American Electronics Recycling is calling on Congress to pass legislation curbing exports of non-working, untested e-scrap. The group notes the material has been shown to feed electronics counterfeiting abroad, a practice that could threaten the reliability of many advanced weapons systems in the U.S. as well as critical civilian infrastructure.

More than 3.3 million pounds of e-scrap were collected in Washington state in January, roughly the same weight collected in January 2014, according to E-Cycle Washington. Since the recycling program began in 2009, an average of 3.25 million pounds have been collected in the month of January, when many consumers tend to dispose of old electronics in favor of ones they got during the holidays.

In other news from the Evergreen State, officials there are considering expanding the state e-scrap recycling program to include computer peripherals such as printers, keyboards and mice, according to the Northwest Product Stewardship Council. The Washington Department of Ecology will conduct a stakeholder process this year to gather input on expanding the program, with the goal of submitting a draft bill for consideration by the legislature in 2016.

The Buffalo News recently examined how a New York law that took effect this year banning e-scrap from the trash can has affected recycling options. Costs to recycle CRTs are being passed down to collectors, including Goodwill, which decided to stop accepting old TV sets and computer monitors. But the Salvation Army says it is still accepting them because they’re still selling in its thrift stores, and Salvation Army also says a partnership with Electronic Recyclers International allows the nonprofit group to cost-effectively recycle the old sets that don’t sell.

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Industry & supplier news

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 21:32
Industry & supplier news

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 13, 2015

Electronic Recyclers International has named Allen Hershkowitz, co-founder of the Green Sports Alliance and a professor in sustainability management, as the company’s senior sustainability advisor. Hershkowitz also served as senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council for 26 years. For more, click here.

Sims Recycling Solutions has hired Ping Yi to its international business development team, according to a press release. The national e-scrap firm, part of publicly traded Sims Metal Management, reported that Ping will work to expand and develop the company’s IT asset disposition offerings in Asia. For more, clickhere.

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EPA looks to CRT glass landscape

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:32
EPA looks to CRT glass landscape

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has sent out a series of documents on the state of CRT glass processing and possible industry-wide solutions going forward.

The documents, sent to attendees of recent EPA meetings on CRT issues, are aimed at reporting on industry input and "continuing the dialogue" surrounding management of leaded glass, the agency stated in an email.

One of the EPA documents, a diagram covering the CRT landscape, breaks down the various challenges facing the industry. The diagram is based on discussions that took place during a two-day stakeholder meeting hosted by the agency in Arlington, Virginia last September. It is also the most thorough breakdown to date of the recycling and reuse opportunities for CRT glass.

The diagram examines eight potential processes that aim to handle leaded CRT glass. Several of the ideas mentioned – including use of CRT glass in ceramics and concrete products, a retrievable storage scenario, and recovery via copper smelters and chemical extraction – are relatively new entrants into the ongoing industry CRT conversation.

In a separate document that recaps the summit in Arlington, EPA stresses both new and emerging options need to be carefully vetted before use.

"For both new and existing technology it is critical for the electronics community to make strides to improve knowledge of material content and toxicity, enforce existing worker health and safety regulations, and follow best practices to reduce human and environmental exposure to potentially toxic materials," the document reads.

A third document released by EPA last week details the U.S. EPA Meeting on Cathode Ray Tubes, held at the end of the E-Scrap 2014 conference in Orlando, Florida. At that meeting, members of the industry convened with the EPA to review the Arlington meeting and further hash out concerns.

“Enforcement looks like a toothless tiger,” Simon Greer, owner of emerging glass processor Nulife Glass, said at the time. “Make noise about it, please. It will discourage others.”

In its report on the meeting, EPA was careful to note any potential actions would be part of an industry-wide effort, not simply a regulatory one.

"EPA said they hoped to begin working with the electronics recycling community on a strategy that would coordinate multiple actions by the community and help address the current problems with recycling CRTs," the document states.

Barnes Johnson, an EPA deputy director, reiterated that desire in the email sent out to industry members last week.

"EPA cannot address the challenges we face around electronics management alone," Johnson said. "We all have a role and together we can make significant progress."

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Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:28
Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

North America's largest plastics recycling conference will offer some useful knowledge to e-scrap players as well.

Plastics Recycling 2015 will provide an exclusive first look at research on the plastics recovered from scrap electronics. This data-compiling project investigates where e-plastic discards are being generated and where they’re going once they are processed.

A critical analysis of e-plastics consumption, recovery and recycling will be offered, and it will be accompanied by strategies that firms can employ to overcome e-plastic profitability challenges.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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State programs' approach to CRTs unlikely to shift

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:24
State programs' approach to CRTs unlikely to shift

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

During a recent webinar, an expert in e-scrap legislation delved into some trends surrounding state programs and the ways they are dealing with the CRT stream.

Jason Linnell, executive director of the National Center for Electronics Recycling (NCER), a nonprofit organization that assists many state e-scrap programs, noted that of the 25 states that require device manufacturers to pay for the recycling of old electronics, only a handful have ruled CRTs sent to landfills can count toward the manufacturers' recycling targets.

And unless something dramatic happens in the market – for example, a large consuming plant closes – those states aren’t likely to change their minds, Linnell said during the Greeneye Partners EHS Roundtable webinar.

“For the time being, the way the market options are as they stand today, I think the states are probably going to stay with what they have,” Linnell told E-Scrap News in a follow-up interview.

In the U.S., 25 states have some type of electronics recycling program on the books, covering roughly two-thirds of the country’s population. Of those 25 states, 19 responded to an NCER survey asking about their requirements for handling CRT glass, Linnell told webinar participants.

While a total of 14 said they permitted some form of CRT glass landfilling, just three states – Connecticut, Illinois and Vermont – said they would, under certain circumstances, count the practice of turning treated CRT funnel glass into alternative daily cover (ADC) as recycling. Until July 2014, Wisconsin had also counted ADC as recycling under its state program, but it has since changed its stance.

The CRT-to-ADC method has been championed by Illinois-based Kuusakoski US as a solution to the challenging CRT glass market, but has faced an uphill battle in combating the perception that the approach is disposal, not recycling.

Linnell added that some original equipment manufacturers have also opposed the approach due to concerns about the public perception of Kuusakoski's method.

In addition to the landfill discussion, the webinar touched on several other issues.

Connecticut officials established a per-pound rate that e-scrap recycling companies can bill to manufacturers required to pay for recycling. During the webinar, Linnell was asked whether other states are looking at that model, which aims to ensure recyclers are paid enough to carry out processing.

Linnell said he doesn’t envision that approach being replicated elsewhere and told listeners that no other states have seriously considered the approach since 2009. Reluctance, Linnell suggested, has derived from the feeling that state officials might not be able to truly gauge current pricing realities.

The last states to pass laws establishing recycling programs did so nearly five years ago, and, since then, no new statewide laws have been passed. The only two laws enacted were an ordinance in Washington, D.C. passed last year that goes into effect in 2017 and, in 2012, Colorado passed a landfill ban for electronics, but the legislation does not mandate a recycling collection network.

At one point, industry folks were saying that, by 2015, the entire U.S. would be covered by electronics recycling laws, Linnell said on the webinar.  “As we can see, that wasn’t ever really realistic,” he said.

He doesn’t see the number increasing this year either. And, in the short- to medium-term, he doesn’t see Congress passing a national law.  “At the federal level, there hasn’t been a whole lot of activity,” he said.

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Hugo Neu relocates processing site to NJ

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:19
Hugo Neu relocates processing site to NJ

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

Feb. 5, 2015

To meet growing demand, e-scrap recycling company Hugo Neu Recycling will close its facility in Mount Vernon, New York and open a larger, more advanced one in New Jersey, the company says.

"It certainly will meet the demands of our growing business,” Alan Ratner, the company's president, told E-Scrap News.

Hugo Neu Recycling provides various services for organizations. While Ratner said Hugo Neu's primary business is in collecting and recycling e-scrap, the company also provides data destruction and refurbishment services.

Hugo Neu Recycling’s new facility in the northern New Jersey town of Kearny is estimated to be roughly 40 percent larger than the one being closed, and it will incorporate newer technologies, according to Ratner. The company was awarded a 10-year, $4.5 million Grow New Jersey loan from the state's Economic Development Authority to help finance the relocation.

While the company plans to close its current recycling facility in Mount Vernon, it will retain a separate shredding and downstream recycling facility there. According to Ratner, the company doesn’t know yet whether it will see a net job gain or loss, but all of the employees at the facility slated for closure have been invited to transfer to the new one. Mt. Vernon is about an hour's drive from Kearny.

“Our hopes are that our workforce joins us,” he said.

Hugo Neu Recycling plans to have the Kearny facility operating by the end of April.


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Certification scorecard

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:16
Certification scorecard

Feb. 5, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Securis of Chantilly, Virginia achieved certification to the R2:2013, ISO 14001 and OSHAS 18001 standards.

American Data Security, Inc. of Oak Park, Michigan; Eco Shred of Lafayette, Indiana; Gilmore Services of Pensacola, Florida; Puliz Records Management of Reno, Nevada; Rapid Shred L.L.C. of Grandville, Michigan; Safeguard Shredding of Alexandria, Virginia; Secure On-Site Shredding of Palm Harbor, Florida; Shred Defense, Inc. of Richmond, California; and Time Shred Services of Freeport, New York have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Lewis Clark Recyclers, Inc. of Lewiston, Idaho; Opportunity Distributing, Inc of Hopkins, Minnesota; and Reclamere, Inc. of Tyron, Pennsylvania have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization Operations and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.


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NewsBits

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 20:15
NewsBits

Feb. 5, 2015

Despite rumors to the contrary, Missouri-based Doe Run continues to process CRT glass. According to Lou Magdits, the company's director of Raw Materials, Doe Run "consumes CRT glass on a regular basis," and he fully expects the company to do so going forward. "In the past few months we have been adjusting our inventory, which has led to less glass coming into our doors," Magdits told E-Scrap News.

Kentucky has awarded its state e-scrap contract to Global Environmental Services (GES). According to the agreement , executive branches of the state government will be required to send all e-scrap to GES for processing while "all city and county governments and community recycling programs" can use the company as well. The contract also states that GES will only charge for CRT TVs (10 cents per pound) while taking all other e-scrap in bulk for free, including CRT monitors.

An e-scrap recycling event in Syracuse, New York was so successful that police had to shut down a freeway off-ramp because of traffic jams. The collection event at the Syracuse Department of Public Works’ garage yielded eight tractor-trailers full of e-scrap, for an estimated 100 tons. That was four times what was collected last year, before a statewide law went into effect banning the the disposal of electronics at the curb or in the trash.

Electronic Recyclers International (ERI) is taking part in the Person in Port program, a joint initiative launched by The United Nations University, U.S. EPA and the Basel Convention Coordination Centre for Africa. The aim of the program is to track the flow of e-scrap into Nigeria, a major hub of used electronics imports, to identify the condition, quantity and fate of electronics shipped there. ERI has provided educational assistance to bring program leaders up to speed on responsible handling and recycling of end-of-life electronics.

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