E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 3 hours 53 min ago

Oregon processor moves some operations south

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:06
Oregon processor moves some operations south

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

August 27, 2015

An Oregon-based e-scrap processor says government regulation practices and tough commodity markets have led the company to relocate shredding operations to Texas.

Export Global Metals (EG Metals) has battled with state environmental regulators over compliance with stormwater regulations at its Portland, Ore.-area facility.

The state Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in January fined the company, alleging it exposed e-scrap to the elements. EG Metals disputed the allegation and appealed the fine.

As of Aug. 1, the company is no longer shredding e-scrap at the facility, Peter Van Houten, company general manager and vice president of operations, told E-Scrap News. It is currently in the process of moving the shredder to a new 90,000-square-foot location in Carrollton, Texas, a Dallas suburb.

Meanwhile, in an Aug. 13 letter, DEQ confirmed EG Metals was in compliance with a June agreement and order regarding the storage of materials.

In the future, the 15,000-square-foot building in Oregon formerly housing the shredder will only accept e-scrap, sort it into gaylords and ship it out, and all e-scrap to be shipped out will be stored indoors, according to Van Houten.

"I can't point and say 'We're moving this because of DEQ,' but that was the catalyst," he said. "Doing business in Oregon has not been as great as we expected it could be."

"Oregon is becoming over-regulated on recycling facilities," he added.

DEQ officials could not be reached for comment by press time.

Low commodity prices are also a reason EG Metals, which has already laid off workers, is moving the shredder, Van Houten said. Ferrous metal prices EG Metals can fetch are less than one-quarter what they were a year and a half ago, he said.

"Look at the pricing," he said. "We're at the lowest price (since) before 2001 on literally every market."

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Report: Embattled Materials Processing Corp. shuts down

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:06
Report: Embattled Materials Processing Corp. shuts down

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

August 27, 2015

Materials Processing Corp., the Minneapolis-based e-scrap company fined by state regulators for improper storage of CRTs, has shut down operations.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports MPC shut down in the wake of state fines, the loss of e-Stewards certification and a drop in commodity prices.

E-Stewards investigated and withdrew MPC's certification for one year after the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency levied a $125,000 fine against the company for stockpiling 2,500 tons of CRT glass in the Twin Cities area. MPC paid to move the material to a hazardous waste facility.

The company has been struggling financially for some time, court records indicate. The company used to have a processing facility in Philadelphia but, starting in August 2014, became embroiled in a legal battle with the landowner over alleged back-rent and damages.

While the case was proceeding, MPC told the landowner it was in financial distress and unless the landowner would accept a modest settlement paid over time, MPC's financial situation would continue to deteriorate, attorneys representing MPC wrote in court documents.

In July, MPC terminated its legal representation because it couldn't afford their services, court documents show. The attorneys said MPC owed them more than $60,000 in unpaid legal costs. MPC currently lack representation in the case.

Jim Puckett, executive director of the Basel Action Network, which created the e-Stewards standard, told E-Scrap News his group received a letter from MPC saying the company intended to appeal the suspension, but the appeal never came, and e-Stewards hasn't heard anything from the company since.

The Star Tribune reports competing companies OceanTech and Tech Dump have seen significant demand from former MPC customers.

MPC's listed phone number was disconnected as of Wednesday morning. The company did not respond to a request for an interview on the matter.

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It's not too late to register for E-Scrap 2015

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:05
It's not too late to register for E-Scrap 2015

August 27, 2015

As the week's news indicates, markets are tight and firms of all sizes are struggling to stay afloat. E-Scrap 2015, which takes place next week, is designed to help industry players navigate challenges and find hidden opportunities amid the upheaval.

From the always-bustling trade show floor to the discussions generated by two days of presentations and debate, the E-Scrap Conference is the annual meeting place for e-scrap processors and business owners from around the world. Don't miss out on the one event this year that can help you weather the tough market and look ahead toward continued growth.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Fla. Last year's conference brought together more than 1,300 attendees from 35 countries and similar numbers are expected for the upcoming iteration. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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California rare earth mine suspends production

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:05
California rare earth mine suspends production

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

August 27, 2015

Citing depressed prices, rare earth company Molycorp has decided to temporarily halt production at its Mountain Pass, Calif. mine, the company announced.

The Greenwood Village, Colo.-based company announced it will transition the facility to a "care and maintenence" mode by Oct. 20. Its customers who rely on rare earths to produce magnets for electronics will not be affected, the company said.

Prices have fallen dramatically for rare earths over the past four years, the main reason Molycorp is suspending production at Mountain Pass, according to Molycorp, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier this year.

China mines the majority of rare earth elements used in electronics. In the late 2000s, China began limiting exports, sending prices to record levels in 2010 and spurring investment in U.S. production capacity and rare earth recycling efforts. Then, China relaxed export restrictions, and some companies found alternatives to rare earths.

A number of enterprises have been launched to recover rare earths from recovered electronics.

The open pit Mountain Pass mine, located between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, produces lighter rare earth elements used in devices such as phones, but they fetch lower prices than the heavier ones mined at Molycorp's operation in Canada, according to The Denver Post.

The California mine was inactive from 2002 to 2010 and re-opened in mid-2014 after three years of facility improvements. Molycorp called it "one of the world's most technologically advanced, energy efficient and environmentally progressive rare earth facilities."

From the 1960s to the 1980s, the facility produced most of the world's rare earth elements.

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IDC: 2-in-1 devices expected to defy overall decline in tablet shipments

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:04
IDC: 2-in-1 devices expected to defy overall decline in tablet shipments

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

August 27, 2015

Shipments of new tablets are expected to drop further in 2015 than previously estimated, while shipments of 2-in-1 devices have a bright future, according to International Data Corp.

Meanwhile, mobile phone shipments are expected to grow this year, though at a lesser rate than predicted in an earlier forecast.

According to International Data Corp.'s (IDC) latest forecast, worldwide tablet shipments are expected to decline 8 percent in 2015. That's a steeper drop than IDC's previous forecast, which showed them dropping 3.8 percent.

Meanwhile, global shipments in the 2-in-1 segment are forecast to grow 86.5 percent this year, IDC predicts. Devices in the 2-in-1 category are essentially combination laptops and tablets. The number expected to be shipped in 2015, 14.7 million devices, is still only about 7 percent of all tablets, according to IDC.

"In the past, the biggest challenges with 2-in-1 devices were high price points, less-than-appealing designs, and, quite frankly, lack of demand for Windows 8, which was the OS most devices were running," Ryan Reith, program director with IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, stated in a press release.

Today, more electronics companies are producing 2-in-1 devices, increasing competition and driving down prices, according to IDC. Additionally, with the launch of Windows 10, the introduction of more Android-based products and the possibility Apple will release a larger, screen-detachable iPad, 2-in-1s are a form factor to watch, according to IDC.

IDC predicted mobile-phone global shipments to grow 10.4 percent in 2015. That projection is down from IDC's previous 11.3 percent year-over-year growth projection.

The slower growth is due to the expectation that China will settle into a more mature growth pattern, according to IDC.

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Patent watch

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:04
Patent watch

August 27, 2015

Manerbio, Italy's Danilo Domenico Molteni was awarded Patent Application No. 20110147279 for a kind of eddy current separator.

A method and system for separating and recovering wire and other metals from processed scrap is the subject of Patent Application No. 20110147501, given to Thomas Valerio from New Port Richey, Fla.

Patent Application No. 20110230689, concerning a system of processing waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) via melting of the materials, was awarded to Victoria, Australia's P-Fuel Ltd.

James Akridge, from Tuscon, Ariz., was given Patent Application No. 20110274598, which describes a method of recovering metals from scrap electronic materials.

A portable device that can discern whether cells contain levels of toxic substances, such as those that are commonly found in scrap electronics, is the subject of Patent Application No. 20120045835, awarded to a group of Bologna, Italy-based researchers, led by Elisa Michelini.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database at patft.uspto.gov/.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Early birds get the workshops at E-Scrap 2015

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:04
Early birds get the workshops at E-Scrap 2015

August 27, 2015

As you finalize travel plans for next week's E-Scrap 2015, aim to be in Orlando early in the week to maximize your experience at North America's largest gathering of e-scrap professionals.

Tuesday, Sept. 1 will be packed with workshops and seminars offered by the leading groups in electronics recycling. Learn how to maximize mobile-device value and optimize business models with ISRI. Get up to speed on what R2, e-Stewards, RIOS and ISO certification can do for your operation. Digest the facts on state law updates from the Electronics Recycling Coordination Clearinghouse. All that and more will await early arrivers.

To see complete details on the workshops and other extra events, click here. You will be able to register for the individual events as you register for the conference itself.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Fla. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for the latest on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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Certification scorecard

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:03
Certification scorecard

August 27, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Global Ewaste Solutions of Guelph, Ontario is now certified to the e-Stewards and ISO 14001 standards. Knowledge Computers, a sister business to Global Ewaste that focuses on network hardware resale, also gained ISO 14001 certification.

Absolute Data Shredding of Norman, Okla.; American Document Services LLC of Las Cruces, N.M.; American Shredding Inc. of Salt Lake City; Mobile Documents Destruction of Kankakee, Ill.; Records Management Center of Bangor, Maine; River Mill Data Management, LLC of Columbus, Ga.; Safeguard Shredding LLC of Ft. Myers, Fla.; Secure Records Management Systems of Sanford, Maine; and TechnoCycle of Houston have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:02
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

August 27, 2015

A Chinese consumer electronics company will launch a mobile phone recycling program but acknowledges the effort is unlikely to bring in beaucoup profits, and an advocacy group is New Zealand says the government needs to implement a product stewardship program for electronics.

Chinese consumer electronics company Meizu Technology will launch a mobile phone recycling program called "mCycle," Want China Times reports. A Meizu officials said he doesn't expect the recycling business to make much money but hopes it will help build its brand name. Chinese mobile phone dismantling companies generally run profit margins of under 10 percent, according to Want China Times.

U.K. nonprofit organization Techfortrade wants to bring 3-D printing technology to poor and developing countries, allowing them to turn discarded plastics into new products. Its program Retr3d aims to help them build cheap 3-D printing equipment from e-scrap, according to 3Dprint.com.

Students at a Kolkata university saw a lack of e-scrap collection opportunities, so they took matters into their own hands. Five students at Jadavpur University have started their own campaign to collect e-scrap, and they're planning to expand it to another university and a college, NDTV.com reports.

The organization behind New Zealand's eDay recycling events says the government is failing to provide a roadmap for sustainable e-scrap recycling. EDay Trust says a new government report has just sparked new fears about e-scrap ending up in landfills. The group advocates adoption of a product stewardship model for electronics.

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NewsBits from E-Scrap News

Wed, 08/26/2015 - 18:01
NewsBits

August 27, 2015

Convenient? Yes. Curbside collections of e-scrap certainly are that. But Jason Linnell, executive director of the National Center for Electronics Recycling, says the curbside model isn't the way to go with e-scrap. Weather can destroy reuse potential, scavengers can leave a mess of broken material and data thieves could get their hands on personal information, he writes.

The state electronics recycling program in Pennsylvania is broken, because electronics manufacturers aren't paying the true costs of recycling e-scrap, writes government relations firm Crisci Associates. The commentary, published in the PA Environment Digest, says collection locations are disappearing in the state, including in the most populous counties, and it advocates changes to the law.

Cohen Recycling has broken ground on a $7 million expansion of its e-scrap recycling facility in Middleton, Ohio. The expansion will house a new processing system allowing the company to process eight times the volume of e-scrap at that location, which is located between Cincinnati and Dayton. When complete, the system will be able to process more than 20,000 pounds of material per hour.

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India imposes ban on imports of e-scrap

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:24
India imposes ban on imports of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

August 20, 2015

India will no longer consider requests to import certain categories of scrap electronics in an effort to prevent the material from later becoming burdensome e-waste.

The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change on July 16 said it will no longer consider applications to import e-scrap for trading purposes. Imports of used computers, servers and accessories won't be allowed unless those devices are scheduled for re-export within a year. In addition, the government is prohibiting imports of used medical equipment that is more than three years old.

"The items proposed to be imported are known to have short functional life and are prone to become obsolete in a short period of time," according to minutes of a June 3 meeting of a technical review committee. "Therefore, generation of e-waste would become quicker in the country."

At the June 3 meeting, the committee recommended rejecting Apple's request to import 100,000 used iPhones and 250,000 used iPads. Apple was "contemplating exploring the market for refurbished EEE in India," according to the meeting minutes.

Apple said the products are sold at "Apple Certified-PreOwned" outlets after repair by the OEM, according to The Indian Express. The newspaper reported that other major electronics companies have also had import requests rejected, including IBM, Nokia, Honeywell and Hewlett-Packard.

Chennai, India-based Accel Frontline Global IT Services tried to import 173,328 refurbished hard drives from various countries, including the U.S., but the application was rejected.

The ministry also said it wouldn't consider applications to import some types of plastic scrap.

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Sims opens up on e-Stewards exit

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:24
Sims opens up on e-Stewards exit

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

August 20, 2015

The leader of Sims Recycling Solutions says the e-Stewards certification no longer makes business sense for the major electronics processor. He added that recent e-Stewards decisions on prison labor and CRT glass have started to "water down" the standard.

SRS, the e-scrap wing of publicly traded Sims Metal Management, had all nine of its U.S. processing facilities certified to the environmental standard. The company, which is in the midst of a sizable restructuring, announced the decision to part ways with Seattle-based e-Stewards Aug. 14.

"What we found is that the e-Stewards certification isn't providing any real material business value to Sims in the U.S.," Steve Skurnac, SRS's president, later told E-Scrap News in an interview. "I think recyclers have always been interested in it, but the folks that use recyclers, whether they're corporations or municipalities, don't see it as a super-high priority."

Skurnac said Sims' corporate clients in the U.S. increasingly do their own audits of downstream recycling companies.

He also said recent policy moves by e-Stewards regarding the use of prison labor and CRT glass caught the company's attention. Leaders of the certification are currently deciding whether to expand its policy toward landfilling CRT glass – permissible only as a "last resort" – to storing it indefinitely on the grounds of a solid waste landfill.

"If you're going to say it's okay to landfill because you don't have a choice, and you're going to potentially consider a solitary landfill to benefit one company that may come in the future to grab it, part of that just starts to water down the certification," Skurnac said. "That's our point of view and it's not adding any value to our business."

Jim Puckett, executive director of the Basel Action Network (which created the e-Stewards standard), said he is hopeful Sims will reconsider its move. Puckett added he "vehemently disagrees" with the suggestion the certification is not worth its price tag.

In addition, Puckett stood by the group's recent movement on prison labor, allowable only with written approval, and CRT glass, which as of now can be sent to solid waste landfills as a last resort but is not considered recycling.

"We've strengthened things," Puckett said in an interview. He added that Sims' reasoning for dropping the standard "sounds like an excuse to me. I think what it comes down to is the cost of meeting a high bar."

Currently, e-Stewards is aiming to clarify its stance on CRT glass and one emerging option for it: The group is considering a petition from e-Stewards member Kuusakoski to allow CRT glass to be stored on the grounds of an Illinois landfill for "future recovery."

Puckett confirmed no e-Stewards decision had been reached.

"We are in the process of looking at a petition that was sent to us, but there hasn't been a determination on that," Puckett stated. "So Sims might not agree with it, but I would hope they agree with the democratic process."

SRS, meanwhile, has also been involved in complicated decision making of late. Over the past 18 months, the processor has undertaken a sizable restructuring of its operations, closing all of its Canadian processing sites and significantly reducing its role in the U.K. The company has also shut down plants in New Jersey and Texas.

In response to Sims' recent certification announcement, e-Stewards leaders issued a press release and characterized the processor's move as a reaction to "tough economic times."

"A very wrong and discredited message is sent – 'being responsible is expendable,'" the statement reads.

Skurnac, however, defined the move as one based on value, not cost.

"Our standards are not being lowered, they're not expendable and this is not a financial decision based on Sims' profit and loss," Skurnac stated. "It's a financial decision based on the value of that certification."

While Skurnac would not detail how much Sims pays e-Stewards in annual fees, he described the sum as "a big number" and "at the top end of the scale." Companies certified to e-Stewards pay an annual marketing and licensing fee on a sliding scale based on revenues and capping out at $90,000.

Sims will retain its certifications with R2 for "the time being," Skurnac said.


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Just two weeks until E-Scrap 2015

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:22
Just two weeks until E-Scrap 2015

August 20, 2015

With E-Scrap 2015 right around the corner, now's the time to make sure you're registered and ready to take advantage of the industry's premier trade show.

Running Sept. 1-3, E-Scrap 2015 will offer attendees an in-depth look at the top issues facing the industry and an opportunity to seal deals face-to-face with longstanding and prospective clients. Hoping to find a more affordable and reliable CRT glass partner? Aiming to overcome tough commodity pricing and continue growth? Want to know what to look out for when processing LCD TVs and monitors? E-Scrap 2015 provides attendees with the answers and business they need to keep the industry moving and growing.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Fla. Last year's conference brought together more than 1,300 attendees from 35 countries and similar numbers are expected for the upcoming iteration. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for the latest on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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Firm nabs access to federally funded rare earth technology

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:22
Firm nabs access to federally funded rare earth technology

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

August 20, 2015

Researchers funded by the U.S. government have developed an easier and cheaper way of extracting rare earth elements from magnets in electronics. Now the method will be used by a publicly traded company.

The technology, developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute, is being licensed to Texas-based U.S. Rare Earths, which will use the process to attempt to recover rare earth elements from scrap electronics. The company entered into an exclusive global commercial patent license agreement on Aug. 3. U.S. Rare Earths is traded on the over-the-counter market.

Rare earth materials are key ingredients in magnets in many electronics, including mobile phones, hard disk drives, computers, cars and electric motors. China, which controls nearly all of the mined rare earths in the world, began limiting exports in 2007. That led to greater investment from electronics and car manufacturers and the federal government in rare earth recovery technologies.

The technology being licensed by U.S. Rare Earths uses hollow fiber membranes, organic solvents and neutral extractants to recover neodymium, dysprosium and praseodymium. The membrane extraction system was shown in a lab to recover more than 90 percent of the three elements in a highly pure form from scrap neodymium-based magnets, according to a press release.

The technology was invented by Daejin Kim and Bhave at the ORNL and Eric Peterson at the Idaho National Laboratory. Both labs are partners in the two-year-old Critical Materials Institute.

ORNL spokeswoman Morgan McCorkle told E-Scrap News they don't release details on license payments because it is business-sensitive information, but the fees are intended to recover, over time, what was invested in the technology.

"The license agreement takes into consideration that bringing a technology to market is a long-term process," she said.

U.S. Rare Earths calls the new process MSX Technology, short for Membrane Assisted Solvent Extraction.

“Based on conversations around our mutual commitment to U.S. sustainability, we agreed that the recycling of electronic waste will provide a competitive source of neodymium, dysprosium and praseodymium for growing the clean-tech sector including electric vehicles,” Kevin Cassidy, CEO for Plano, Texas-based U.S. Rare Earths, stated in the press release.

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OSHA to meet monthly on temp worker issues

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:19
OSHA to meet monthly on temp worker issues

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

August 20, 2015

Do you rely on temporary workers to help round out your processing team? If so, you might want to tune in to upcoming meetings on their safety and rights.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has scheduled four monthly meetings with the 12-member National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health's Temporary Workers Work Group (NACOSH). Held in Washington D.C. at the U.S. Department of Labor, the meetings will be open to the public to attend in-person or via teleconference and will address "workplace safety and health issues regarding temporary workers."

OSHA has been particularly proactive in the e-scrap processing space over the years, raising concerns about worker exposure and health risks and stressing the importance of best practices. NACOSH advises OSHA on a variety of issues arising from the health and safety of workers.

Meetings on the following dates have been scheduled by OSHA thus far and will start at 11 a.m. ET:

  • Aug. 24
  • Sept. 21
  • Oct. 16
  • Nov. 20

Individuals interested in participating can reach out to Gretta Jameson at (202) 693-2176 or Jameson.GrettaH@dol.gov.

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SERI moves R2 forward in South America

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:18
SERI moves R2 forward in South America

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

August 20, 2015

Consultants have completed gaps analyses and trainings for four South American e-scrap firms working toward meeting R2:2013 certification.

Sustainable Electronics Recycling International (SERI) announced the progress in its project to expand R2 certifications to Latin America. In an earlier phase of the project, the group had already translated the R2 standard to Spanish and Portuguese.

Greeneye Partners, a consulting and auditing firm, in mid-July visited sites in Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador to conduct gap analyses and provide R2 implementation training to facility managers and environmental health and safety representatives, SERI announced in its newsletter.

"[Greeneye's Kelley Keogh] had very good things to say about all the facilities and was very positive about their prospects for certification," SERI Program Director Henry Leineweber told E-Scrap News.

So far, the biggest success for the project has been the overall desire by facility managers to get certified, Leineweber said.

"Since there are very few certified options right now in Latin America, there's relatively little market pressure to get certified," he said. "I think it's a testament to the facilities that are participating that they've been willing to put in the time and effort to embark on this process."

A major challenge has been the language barrier because much of the certification process involves face-to-face communications. The hope is the project leads to more R2 auditors who are fluent in Spanish and Portuguese.

In addition to Greeneye Partners, SERI is working with DIRECTV, Oracle, Sims Recycling Solutions and Arrow Electronics on the project. The project partners are currently helping to pair the participating facilities with a certification body to move forward with R2 certification, Leineweber said. He doesn't know of any Latin American governments requiring e-scrap firms to be R2 certified.

SERI and project partners hope to apply lessons learned by the project to better understand how to expand the R2 footprint around the world, according to SERI.



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E-Scrap 2015: State programs in focus

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:17
E-Scrap 2015: State programs in focus

August 20, 2015

With tightened commodity markets, question marks around CRT glass processing and a growing docket of data on hand, the leaders of state e-scrap programs are now trying to determine the best path forward.

At E-Scrap 2015 this September, the shifting state program landscape will be discussed in-depth. Attendees will get the perspectives of policy experts, processing firms, device manufacturers and state officials.

Together, those voices will help to show a complete picture of the current landscape and explain how your firm can fit into the evolution of government-mandated electronics recycling. Don't miss these crucial discussions.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (that's the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Fla. Last year's conference brought together more than 1,300 attendees from 35 countries and similar numbers are expected for the upcoming iteration. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:16
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

August 20, 2015

Researchers in the U.K. see a bright forecast for the value of e-scrap materials and the Malaysian government has launched a mobile phone collection campaign.

Bangladesh's plan to introduce digital technology to improve the lives of citizens holds promise, but the country should plan now for the wave of e-waste it will help create. That's according to two business consultants, who say the majority of e-scrap in the country of 157 million people is collected, separated and processed in the informal sector.

Researchers in the U.K. say the value of recycled materials from e-scrap is expected to increase by the year 2020 to more than 3.5 billion euros, or nearly $3.9 billion at current exchange rates. That's up from about 2 billion euros in 2014. A summary of the study was published at Phys.org.

The Indian government wants to place e-scrap collection bins at schools in the city of Kochi and teach students about the importance of e-scrap recycling, according to The Times of India. The urban affairs department plans to work with the Clean Kerala Co. to install boxes in schools and at art and engineering colleges.

The Malaysian Telecommunications and Multimedia Commission has launched a mobile phone take-back program, aiming to educate the public on the importance of e-scrap recycling. The Sun Daily reports the commission will place 72 recycling boxes at telecommunications offices around the country.

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Patent watch

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:15
Patent watch

August 20, 2015

Vantaa, Finland's MariCap Oy has developed a method of identifying waste and recyclable materials via RFID tagging systems for simpler sortation and was awarded Patent No. 9,090,399.

An acoustic tracking tag for scrap electronics is the subject of Patent No. 9,111,154, given to Wilmington, Del.-based Empire Technology Development LLC.

Koninklijke Philips N.V., headquartered in Eindhoven, Netherlands, has developed a printed circuit board assembly that is designed for ease of disassembly for e-scrap processors and was given Patent No. 9,113,584.

Rahul Nagpaul from Mumbai, India was awarded Patent Application No. 20150174626 for a method of taking processed waste electrical and electronic equipment and using it to make bricks to be used as building materials.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database at http://patft.uspto.gov/.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Certification scorecard

Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:14
Certification scorecard

August 20, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Asset LifeCycle LLC is now certified to ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 at its facilities in Topeka and Osage City, Kan.

Adelante Document Destruction Services of Albuquerque, N.M. and Green Team Shred-Safe of Pooraka, Australia have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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