E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 1 day 7 hours ago

EPA seeks input on CRT recycling

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:36
EPA seeks input on CRT recycling

By Jerry Powell, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency convened a meeting of some 50 key electronics recycling parties last week near Washington, D.C. to receive advice and input. The meeting — the first "EPA Summit on Electronics" since 2005 — included representatives of original equipment manufacturers, states, nonprofit organizations, e-scrap reclaimers and trade groups.

The two-day session focused on two concerns. EPA sought input on CRT recycling management, including a review of how obsolete CRTs are being handled and how current and future problems can be addressed. Included at the meeting were executives from major CRT processors, including Closed Loop Refining and Recovery, Kuusakoski, Nulife Glass and Universal Recycling Technologies.

The stakeholder group assessed the current CRT recycling landscape, with attention focused on collection and handling practices by e-scrap firms and others. The attendees then assessed the advantages and challenges with a set of CRT recycling options, including use of CRT glass in ceramics and concrete; the recovery of lead from CRTs in de-leading furnaces and lead and copper smelters; the chemical extraction of the lead through leaching; and CRT reuse. Discussion also centered on the use of CRT glass as alternative daily cover in landfills and the storage of CRTs in monofills.

The general consensus generated at the meeting is that obsolete CRTs are backing up in the current recovery system and additional abandoned stockpiles may occur. Some participants urged EPA to adopt a more forceful position in terms of its "speculative accumulation" rule and to increase its regulatory efforts with states to address any future problems.

The participants then generated a set of recommendations for future government-industry efforts in CRT and hazardous materials management, including the development of best practices guidance and new permitting standards for legitimate long-term CRT storage. The stakeholders at the meeting recommended that this work be expanded to include hazardous materials management issues arising from the processing of copiers and flat-panel displays.

The second focus of the meeting was sustainable electronics. Much of the discussion targeted two issues: design of electronics for reuse, repair and recycling, and better ways to determine what makes a firm a "good recycler." In terms of the first concern, the group recommended a number of government and industry actions take place involving electronics designers, software producers and e-scrap reclaimers. For the second issue, the participants want to see a mass-balance tracking system for recyclable materials developed and sample model contract language generated for those wanting to assure environmentally sound recycling.

EPA is eager to get input from others on the Summit recommendations. Agency officials are inviting those interested in CRT management to an open meeting on Oct. 23 in Orlando from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. at a session immediately following the E-Scrap 2014 conference. This will be followed by a sustainable electronics open meeting at the hotel from 3:00 to 4:30 PM. To sign up for these free sessions, here.



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E-Scrap 2014: Attack of the tablets

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:33
E-Scrap 2014: Attack of the tablets

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

As gadgets have transitioned from our desks to our laps to our hands, processors and refurbishers have had to deal with new challenges to effectively dismantle or repair.

At E-Scrap 2014, a number of presentations will help attendees better understand how form factor changes are having an impact on the used electronics sector. Presenters will also offer potential solutions in product design and repairability.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies. Get all the latest information and register to attend here.

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Creative Recycling Systems founder Yob breaks his silence

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:31
Creative Recycling Systems founder Yob breaks his silence

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

After a multimillion dollar lawsuit was dismissed late last week, the founder of a troubled East Coast e-scrap firm has gone on the offensive.

In a 10-paragraph statement issued to E-Scrap News, Jon Yob, the founder and former CEO and president of Creative Recycling Systems (CRS), lays the blame for the recent collapse of his former firm at the feet of Intersection One, the company that purchased CRS from Yob in 2012.

"Things didn't work as they promised," Yob writes. "The company slowly came apart — for many reasons."

Yob was until recently being sued by investor group Intersection One LLC for allegedly overstating the value of CRS at the time of the acquisition in 2012. That lawsuit, court records show, was dismissed "without prejudice of all claims alleged or asserted" on Sept. 26.

In his statement, which was issued in the wake of the suit dismissal, Yob asserts that Rick Bates, the CEO installed by Intersection One, "had absolutely no recycling industry experience" and that a series of bad business decisions were made "without my approval." Yob claims "the purchase contract [between Yob and Intersection One] clearly stated that any changes would need my consent."

Yob adds the company's abandonment of "an industry-leading technique to process and recycle CRT glass" — CRS' BLU BOX CRT glass separator — led to "millions of pounds of unprocessed CRT glass sitting in warehouses."

A recent report indicated more than 30 million pounds of CRT glass are being held at CRS sites in six states.

The legal team for Intersection One did not return a request for comment on Yob's assertions.

The Intersection One suit alleged that Yob misrepresented the value of CRS when the firm was sold. "Defendants led the Investors to believe that CRS was a profitable, large-scale, stable company with healthy cash flow," the lawsuit read. "What Defendants failed to disclose to the Investors was that this depiction of CRS was premised upon abject, widespread and systemic fraud."

According to the lawsuit, Yob claimed his company was worth $55 million, while its true value was "approximately $20 million."

Yob now claims he was the one misled. "In 2013, I reinvested some of my own money into Creative Recycling based on representations the group made to me," he stated. "Turns out, those representations weren't accurate."

Asked whether he would file a lawsuit against Intersection One, Yob told E-Scrap News, "All legal options remain on the table>"

CRS as a company still faces struggles. In a separate lawsuit, a Florida-based bank has sued the company for almost $19 million it says it is owned. Creative has since gone into receivership and filed for bankruptcy as it looks to close locations and sell off any salvageable assets.

The company operated three processing locations and numerous e-scrap collection hubs, most of which were concentrated throughout the East Coast.



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Wide world of e-scrap

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:27
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

UK regulators issue fines for end-of-life electronics that were bound for Africa. That story leads our global look at the industry.

A total of 11 containers of e-scrap bound for Africa were recently intercepted at UK ports by the Environment Agency. The containers, which were said to carry mostly old television sets, have been linked to a handful of Tyneside companies who either failed to label the items for reuse or deliberately attempted to ship off the devices without paying for "proper end-of-life treatment." Six individuals have been fined about $5,700 in all.

Rwanda appears to be on the verge of developing its own e-scrap policy. An environmental fund will contribute $1.3 million to help the African nation organize a national e-scrap strategy, and plans are also in place to fund the building of an e-scrap processing center.

Computer maker Dell has agreed on a 5-year deal with the United Nations to develop e-scrap recycling infrastructure in Africa, Asia and Latin America. According to a report by Forbes, the partners will aim to build processing sites in each region to handle e-scrap, although financial terms of the alignment and potential investment have not been disclosed.

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Certification scorecard

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:25
Certification scorecard

Sept. 30, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

ZRG LLC of Carlsbad, California is now certified to the R2:2013 and RIOS standards.

EnviroShred NW of Portland, Oregon; Proshred Security of Albany, New York; Shred Guard (serving Atlantic Canada) of Saint John, New Brunswick; Shredall Ltd. of Nottingham, England; and Shred Doc Destr dba Balcones Shred of Austin, Texas have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, EPC's E-Scrap Processing Center of Earth City, Missouri has renewed their NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization as well as Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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E-Scrap 2014: Connect with all the key vendors

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:22
E-Scrap 2014: Connect with all the key vendors

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 30, 2014

The bustling trade show hall at E-Scrap 2014 will feature more than 100 leading industry companies that can take your business to new levels. And by connecting with potential partners and suppliers in one spot, you save valuable time and resources.

Exhibiting companies include electronics scrap processors, buyers and brokers, equipment manufacturers, waste haulers, industry trade associations and more. In addition, the trade show at E-Scrap 2014 will open a day earlier than in years past. The hall will open Tuesday, Oct. 21, and hours that initial day will be 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. The hall will also be open for all your networking needs on Wednesday, Oct. 22 and Thursday, Oct. 23.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to secure your spot at this fall's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.


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NewsBits

Tue, 09/30/2014 - 11:18
NewsBits

Sept. 30, 2014

Newfoundland and Labrador's newly installed e-scrap program recently faced criticism after an 2013 annual report detailed a surplus of more than $1.7 million in the consumer-funded initiative. Program director Terry Green has responded to the heat by telling local news outlet VOCM that the program, which launched in August of 2013, is just beginning to gain steam this year, with funds directly feeding that increased recycling activity.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) this week posted a blog entry outlining some of the work the federal agency has done assessing the potential hazards at e-scrap facilities across the country. NIOSH representatives found possible overexposure to lead and cadmium among workers handling CRT de-manufacturing as well as toxic metals existing outside typical processing areas. The blog post follows a more formal report on e-scrap processing hazards NIOSH released this summer.

With its share price now at just a fraction of a penny, publicly traded E-Waste Systems has doubled its share count. The firm, which offers e-scrap processing in Ohio and New York, now has authorized a total of 3 billion common stock shares after adding 1.5 billion late last week. At press time, about 426 million shares are outstanding, leaving more than 2.5 billion up for grabs.

SERI, the housing body for the R2 environmental e-scrap recycling standard, recently announced two new members to its R2 Recycling Leader Program: Oracle and the Reverse Logistics Sustainability Council. Entities in the Leader Program make a commitment to support sustainable electronics recycling as well as consider R2 certification when choosing a recycling partner.

Asserting that "additional action is needed" on e-scrap exports, defense and computer technology experts wrote an op-ed published in Capitol Hill news source Roll Call. The article urges federal legislators to address the problem of used e-scrap parts ending up in ostensibly new defense machinery and weapons. The three writers of the op-ed — Henry Livingston, Tom Sharpe and Jim Burger — offered a similar viewpoint earlier this year at Congressional briefing.

Video game company Warpspeed has become an e-Stewards enterprise. The move is being framed by e-Stewards and Warpspeed as a first step toward getting the gaming industry on board to drive e-scrap recycling. "The video game industry has an opportunity to lead a critical cultural shift with respect to the replacement and proper handling of used electronics," writes Lou Raiola, Founder and CEO of WarpSpeed, in the announcement. "E-Stewards is the best in class certification to ensure that e-waste is recycled ethically by responsible certified recyclers."


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Best Buy pledges to double e-scrap collection

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:53
Best Buy pledges to double e-scrap collection

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Sept. 26, 2014

Best Buy recently reached a major e-scrap recycling milestone, and the company's sustainability chief says the retailer intends to significantly grow collection totals moving forward.

Best Buy announced it has taken in 1 billion pounds of end-of-life electronics and large appliances in the past six years. For a bit of perspective, that total is roughly equivalent to the amount the entire state of California collected through the first six years of its consumer-funded e-scrap program.

What's more, Best Buy thinks it can collect 2 billion pounds of e-scrap and appliances in the next six years, through continuing to offer free recycling services at 1,400 stores throughout the U.S.

"We're selling the products and we need to be part of the solution as well," Scott Weislow, senior director of environmental services at Best Buy, told E-Scrap News. "We are ready, we are committed to it. ... I don't foresee any reason why we would have any hiccups getting to that next 2 billion pound mark."

Though traditionally thought of as a retailer, Best Buy is also one of the nation's largest original equipment manufacturers because it owns and sells the Insignia electronics brand.

As an OEM, Best Buy is required to collect and recycle electronics in about half the states in the U.S. and a good chunk of what the retailer collects goes toward those obligations. "Everything that's in the covered electronics category we count," Weislow said, adding that the company "fulfills our obligations hands down, no question."

Best Buy's two e-scrap partners are Electronic Recyclers International (ERI) and Regency Technologies. Sims Recycling Solutions, Weislow confirmed, is no longer a partner of the company. Sims has recently closed several facilities in North America in an effort to streamline operations and focus more on corporate accounts.

By weight, CRT devices continue to dominate the Best Buy e-scrap collection stream, and the glass from those products ends up either going to glass-to-glass recycling firm Videocon in India or to Ohio's Dlubak operation, which blends leaded glass into "a variety of things, from ornamental glass fixtures to insulation to road-grade materials," Weislow said.

While CRT tonnages have not begun to decrease, Weislow says he thinks the plateau is on the horizon. "I think we will see a shift," Weislow said. "I think we're going to end up seeing more phones and tablets … and I think we'll see more desktops as people go more and more to tablets and laptops and notebooks. And I think we'll see TVs diminish over time. It's not going to happen overnight — I think we're still a few years out before we start seeing much of a decline — but it's coming for sure."

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E-Scrap 2014: Can't-miss sessions

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:51
E-Scrap 2014: Can't-miss sessions

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 26, 2014

E-Scrap 2014 is just around the corner, and if you're still looking for motivation to register, just turn your attention to the conference's four headlining plenary sessions.

On Oct. 22, the leaders of five of the most important e-scrap firms in the country share their insights on the top industry challenges and the solutions they're pioneering. Next up that morning is a session that will dissect CRT recycling from three different angles, offering attendees the most complete picture possible on the CRT market today and what it might look like tomorrow.

Oct. 23 features a plenary session on e-scrap flows and where the scrap electronics of yesteryear are headed today. Later, attendees will hear from experts in the rare earth and critical metals space and learn how those sectors are evolving.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies. Get all the latest information on this year's conference at e-scrapconference.com.


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EPA indicates landfill cover is not CRT recycling

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:48
EPA indicates landfill cover is not CRT recycling

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Sept. 26, 2014

The federal EPA has clarified its regulatory stance on whether leaded glass destined for tile manufacturing or landfill cover should be considered recycling.

In separate letters dated Sept. 10 and uploaded onto the agency's website, Barnes Johnson, the director of the Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery, addresses the use of CRT glass as alternative daily cover (ADC) and as a flux and lead oxide in making ceramic tiles.

According to those letters, the ADC option is considered legitimate disposal while the tile option is legitimate recycling.

"Hazardous waste, such as CRT glass, that has been treated … and that no longer exhibits hazardous characteristics may be disposed in a landfill," Johnson writes in the ADC letter. On the tile front, the agency states, "Based on the provided information, the EPA finds the legitimate recycling factors set forth in EPA policy … appear to have been met."

The letters are addressed to two of the biggest names in the end-of-life electronics game: The ADC letter was sent to Sony, and the tile letter was sent to Sims Recycling Solutions, the electronics recycling wing of publicly traded Sims Metal Management. Sony had asked the agency for clarification on the ADC front, while SRS had requested clarification on the tile option.

It's significant that the tile process received an OK to be deemed recycling while landfill cover is only considered "disposal."

Both ADC and and tile applications are seen as emerging downstream applications for CRT glass, which has become increasingly burdensome for e-scrap firms. Consumers worldwide have moved to non-CRT technologies so glass-to-glass markets for recycling firms have eroded, but the backlog of old monitors and TV sets continues to head into the e-scrap recycling stream.

While the EPA's two letters noted the authority of states to set forth "more stringent" regulatory policies than those asserted by the federal agency, states are likely to refer to the EPA letters for guidance on policy making in the CRT arena.

Kuusakoski U.S. is the only company currently offering the CRT-to-ADC option in North America, partnering with a landfill located in Peoria, Illinois. The process, according to the company, seals the lead within the glass to prevent leaching and then is spread on top of a landfill as ADC.  A Vermont-based firm also looked into the option.

Some states have already concluded the option is not recycling and therefore does not count toward manufacturer recycling goals. In addition, the R2 e-scrap environmental standard has banned the use of CRT glass as ADC. The other certification standard, e-Stewards, meanwhile, allows it as a "last resort," but does not deem it recycling.

The tile option, which will perhaps now get more play, has been looked at for some time both in the U.S. and abroad. Sims' inquiry, E-Scrap News has learned, was related to a Spanish firm, Camacho Recycling, which has been pushing for U.S. glass to process and use in the manufacturing of ceramic tiles. Com2 Recycling, an Illinois-based firm, is also expected to come on-line with its own CRT-to-tile operation in the coming weeks.

Both ADC and tile manufacture have been raised as plausible alternatives to the standard, and often pricey, processing options currently available to U.S. firms, namely North American lead smelting and "glass-to-glass" recycling in India. While estimates vary widely, as much a 400,000 tons of CRT glass are expected to hit the waste stream each year until 2022.

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Wide world of e-scrap recycling

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:44
Wide world of e-scrap recycling

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 26, 2014

One market research group says the global e-scrap business will grow at a nearly 15 percent clip in coming years, and European metals refiners determine a set of e-scrap handling guidelines.

A new report by Sandler Research suggests the global e-scrap market will show a compound annual growth rate of 14.6 percent between 2013 and 2018. "The intense need to reduce toxins discharged from unattended e-waste has forced governments and vendors to invest in the market," Sandler says.

A group of metals refiners in Europe has collaborated with the European Electronics Recyclers Association and a metals association to come up with a set of standard practices for proper treatment of end-of-life electronics. The pact, set to go into effect in two years, has been signed by Aurubis, Boliden, Glencore and Umicore and the quartet hopes more companies will join in on the environmentally-focused cause.

A major telecommunications player in the Philippines is now offering free recycling of a host of electronics. Globe Telecom, under its new Phone 1 project, will accept consumer and business electronics and send them to TES-AMM for recycling — the goal of the program is to divert more materials in the Philippine e-scrap stream, which is growing quickly as citizens purchase and upgrade their electronics.


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Certification scorecard

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:42
Certification scorecard

Sept. 26, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

RPC Global, Inc. of Houston is now certified to the ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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Extra events boost value of E-Scrap 2014

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:40
Extra events boost value of E-Scrap 2014

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 26, 2014

A number of bonus events are occurring in conjunction with the upcoming E-Scrap 2014 conference, adding even more networking and business-building activities to North America's premier electronics recycling gathering. Head to sunny Orlando next month to be part of the following education sessions and events:

  • "Downstream Due Diligence: How to Conduct Audits & Build Relationships," presented by the ISRI Electronics Recycling Education Program
  • "How to Make Money in the Reuse & Proper Recycling of Flat Panel Displays," presented by ISRI Electronics Recycling Education Program
  • "Health & Safety: Protect Your Workers, Protect Your Business," hosted by the e-Stewards Certification Program
  • "e-Stewards: A World of Difference," presented by The e-Stewards Administration
  • "EHS Compliance Boot Camp," presented by Greeneye Partners LLC
  • "Ensuring Transparency and Sustainability under State Electronics Recycling Law Programs," presented by ERCC
  • "New to R2?" presented by SERI
  • "R2 Expert Panel Q&A," presented by SERI
  • "Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) Management," presented by US EPA
  • "Sustainable Electronics Management," Presented by US EPA.
  • Conference welcome reception hosted by ISRI
  • EHS Roundtable Luncheon, presented by Greeneye Partners LLC

Don't miss out on these events and other opportunities to boost your recycling business. E-Scrap 2014 is taking place at the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel in Orlando, Florida Oct. 21-23. Head to e-scrapconference.com for more information.

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NewsBits

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 18:28
NewsBits

Sept. 26, 2014

Some of the biggest e-scrap firms in Pennsylvania have come together to form the Electronics Recycling Association of Pennsylvania through the Pennsylvania Recycling Markets Center. The association will "promote the needs of the Pennsylvania electronics recycling industry while openly fostering common relationships that lead to effective and responsible end-of-life electronics management for all Pennsylvanians," a press release states. A steering committee was formed as part of the group and includes Covanta, eForce, eLoop, Kuusakoski USA and the Pennsylvania Recycling Markets Center.

At the 10th annual Clinton Global Initiative meeting, Outerwall announced it would aim to collect 2 million electronic devices over the next three years through its ecoATM business. As of July 2014 there were more than 1,100 of the firm's automated electronics buyback kiosks located throughout the U.S. The company says it resells 75 percent of collected devices in markets around the world, sending the remaining 25 percent for recycling.

The tech gurus over at iFixit have released their long-awaited teardown of the iPhone 6, giving the device of the moment — okay, maybe of the year — a "respectable" 7 out of 10 for repairability. After taking apart the device, iFixit reps said Apple is continuing to increase the ease of repairing their phones, but they also dinged the brand for using proprietary screws and failing to provide any public information on how to repair the devices at home.

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Smartphones with big screens make big impact

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:57
Smartphones with big screens make big impact

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

With worldwide tablet shipments slightly lower than expected this year, devices that blend the tablet and phone concepts are picking up some of the slack.

Shipments of "phablets," defined by research firm IDC as mobile devices with screen sizes between 5.5 and 7 inches, are expected to reach 175 million units in 2014, 318 million units in 2015 and almost 600 million units by 2018.

That trend explains, at least in part, relatively sluggish shipments of tablets this year. While 2014 growth in tablets shipments was anticipated to reach 12 percent, IDC recently downgraded that expectation to 6.5 percent due to flat mature market demand.

Not surprisingly, Apple's new iPhone 6 will come in two screen sizes, the larger of which, the iPhone 6 Plus, comes with a 5.5 inch screen.

"With Apple expected to join the space in the coming weeks, we anticipate even more attention on phablets as larger screen smartphones become the new norm," said Melissa Chau, senior research manager with IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker.

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E-Scrap 2014: Can't-miss sessions

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:56
E-Scrap 2014: Can't-miss sessions

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

E-Scrap 2014 is just around the corner, and if you're still looking for motivation to register, just turn your attention to the conference's four headlining plenary sessions.

On Oct. 22, the leaders of five of the most important e-scrap firms in the country share their insights on the top industry challenges and the solutions they're pioneering. Next up that morning is a session that will dissect CRT recycling from three different angles, offering attendees the most complete picture possible on the CRT market today and what it might look like tomorrow.

Oct. 23 features a plenary session on e-scrap flows and where our scrap electronics of yesteryear are headed today. Later, attendees will hear from experts in the rare earth and critical metals space and learn how those sectors are evolving.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to make the most of this year's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.


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Major CRT tonnages left in Creative Recycling's wake

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:52
Major CRT tonnages left in Creative Recycling's wake

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

A new report on the state of Creative Recycling System's operations reveals approximately 30 million pounds of glass are stored at company sites in six states.

Filed on Sept. 4, the long-awaited inventory report culminates a month-long review of company operations by Creative's receiver, Robert Swett. With the company bankrupt and in search of a buyer — and also entangled in a multimillion dollar lawsuit — Swett's findings suggest a massive glass cleanup is in store.

According to the report, "approximately 30 million pounds of CRT glass inventory [is] stored in various locations throughout six states." Those states are Florida (approximately 6 million pounds), Illinois (1.5 million pounds), Kentucky (444,400 pounds), Maryland (7.6 million pounds), North Carolina (8.8 million pounds) and South Carolina (5.5 million pounds).

The Florida and North Carolina totals are spread between two facilities each, while the others represent single-facility stockpiles. There was no "legacy glass" found at the company's remaining locations in Connecticut, Georgia, New York or Tennessee, the report states.

Creative is hoping to have a bit more time to get its glass recycled. "CRS has recently applied to the six states for a variance from the 75 percent recycling requirement for 2014 in an effort to mitigate any penalties with not meeting the annual recycling requirement," Swett's report states. "This will alleviate CRS' efforts towards glass recycling, allowing it to focus cash on other areas within the company that are more immediate."

The CRT rule requires firms to recycle 75 percent of their glass inventory by the end of the year, but states can grant variances on a case-by-case basis.

The glass in need of processing includes "separated funnel and panel glass, mixed funnel and panel glass, and broken tubes with steel belts mixed in," Swett's report states. The company had been unable to pay for end-of-life recycling of glass "due to its liquidity crisis over the last 18 months."

With current per-pound recycling costs ranging from 6 to 15 cents, CRS will need to pay at least $1.8 million and as much as $4.5 million to send the glass downstream. The report cites costs ranging from 6 to 12 cents on the pound.

All that said, the report identifies three potential buyers that "have indicated a strong interest in the vertical integration of CRS into their model": Colt Refining and Recycling, Kuusakoski US and CIMMA Recycling. In addition, three private equity groups have also emerged as potential buyers for the firm, according to the report, with all interest deriving from CRS' "true differentiator — the balance maintained between the company's reuse and end-of-life businesses."

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Sprint tries to capitalize on trade-ins

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:49
Sprint tries to capitalize on trade-ins

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Sept. 11, 2014

Sprint has announced it will match or top any trade-in offer from its competitors as it aims to meet high collection and recycling goals.

The wireless carrier, which started its take-back program in 2001, is aiming "to collect an average of nine devices for every 10 devices sold by 2017." To do that, Sprint is attempting to make trading in old devices easier by matching any other offer from Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile.

"Our trade-in program is well known in the industry and when we guarantee the best value over any of our competitors, we’re taking this to another level," said David Owens, senior vice president-product, in the company's announcement. "Offering a competitive price match was the next logical step to ensure existing and new customers understood that we make our trade-in program a top priority and are willing to provide the very best value in the industry."

Sprint's Buyback program, which offers store and account credits of up to $300, also allows consumers to trade in up to five cellular devices per calendar year.

According to the company, more than 80 percent of traded-in devices are reused, while the remaining phones are sent for a recycling to "only certified recyclers." The carrier currently offers its buyback program in about 40 percent of its retail stores, a percentage that will likely need to increase dramatically to meet its 90 percent collection goal.

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Certification scorecard

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:48
Certification scorecard

Sept. 11, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Capitol Asset Recovery, Inc. of Lanham, Maryland is now certified to the e-Stewards, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards.

Reworx, a wholly owned social enterprise organization of the Nobis Works Foundation in Marietta, Georgia has achieved e-Stewards, ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OSHAS 18001 and R2:2013 certifications.

Access of Livermore, California; Access of Fife, Washington; Access of Sacramento, California; A.R.M.S. Inc. of DePere, Wisconsin; Business Records Management LLC of Wickliffe, Ohio; Data Shredding Services of Texas, Inc. II of Grapevine, Texas; Document Shredding & Storage of Amarillo, Texas; Lincoln Archives of Buffalo, New York; Rapid Shred LLC of Grandville, Michigan; Record Keepers LLC of Bismarck, North Dakota; The Shred Truck of St. Louis; and Time Shred Services (Shred Services, Inc.) of Hillside, New Jersey have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Lewis Clark Recyclers, Inc. of Lewiston, Idaho has renewed its NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization Operations and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:43
NewsBits

Sept. 11, 2014

The latest e-scrap collection numbers out of Washington continue to suggest 2014 will be the first year since program implementation that volumes are down. Through the first eight months of the year, Washington's producer-funded e-scrap program, E-Cycle Washington, has led to the collection of 29.5 million pounds of electronics, which is about 4 percent below 2013 January-August totals. Those numbers are giving rise to the hope that CRT tonnages in the state are beginning to plateau.

The U.S. EPA hosted a conference call on the CRT rule this week after a petition by consultancy TransparentPlanet netted more than 240 signatures in support of increased focus on enforcing the rule. While the call was not open to members of the media, TransparentPlanet has reflected on the session in a petition update, which urges members of the industry to sign and push the federal agency to action. Read it here.

While Guiyu, China has been etched in many minds as a toxic hub of the underground e-scrap world, a new report from PCWorld suggests things are beginning to change there. The cause of the shift, asserts reporter Michael Kan, is a new recycling plant outside of town that is helping to reduce hazardous activities such as the burning of electronics.


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