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PetroChem Wire: Recycled nylon 66 prices higher in April

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/15/2015 - 10:35
PetroChem Wire: Recycled nylon 66 prices higher in April

April 15, 2015

Higher nylon feedstock prices are strengthening recycled nylon resin prices in April.

Nylon 66 post-industrial flake prices are up about 5 cents per pound from late March. Business was done in the first full week of April at 44 to 46 cents per pound for post-industrial unfilled black regrind and at 42 to 43 cents per pound for PI mixed color regrind.

Nylon 6 PI unfilled flake prices were steady during the same time frame, with black material at 23 cents per pound and mixed color at 21 cents per pound, both FOB U.S. East Coast.

The spread between Nylon 6 and Nylon 66 pellet prices has widened slightly from late March to mid-April, moving from 2 cents per pound to 3 cents per pound as Nylon 66 strengthened. Still, that’s far from the more typical 10 to 12 cents per pound spread nylon 66 has commanded over nylon 6 in the U.S. East Coast market in the recent past.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/15/2015 - 10:34
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

April 15, 2015

One of the of the world's largest cities has banned petroleum-based plastic grocery bags, and the U.K.’s Green Party says if elected it would take new steps to reduce plastic waste and increase recycling.

Sao Paulo, the largest city in the Southern Hemisphere, has banned petroleum-based plastic grocery bags. The new law allows stores to offer only plant-based plastics. A 2012 ban was halted by industry legal action and opposition from consumers.

The U.K.’s Green Party, if elected, will increase the country’s diversion goals and increase funding to support recycling, according to its new pledge. It would tax plastic bags and other packaging as well as ban disposal of food waste in landfills. The party says it would also make it difficult for the waste-to-energy industry to move forward.

Cascades Recovery and CellMark BC Holdings have formed a joint venture marketing and selling recovered materials generated from four Canadian provinces and the Pacific Northwest in the U.S., according to a press release. The new venture, called CasCell Trading Group, will be headquartered in Surrey, British Columbia. For more, click here.

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NewsBits from Plastics Recycling Update

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/15/2015 - 10:33
NewsBits

April 15, 2015

Lansing, Michigan newspaper City Pulse recently delved into challenges local company Dart Container Corp. is facing as governments nationwide implement EPS bans. While the material is recyclable, costs and market challenges make it difficult or impossible to efficiently recover, particularly through a curbside model.

W Hotels Worldwide will begin using bed sheets made using recycled PET with the EKOCYCLE brand, part of a deal between the hotel chain, the Coca-Cola Co. and musician and entrepreneur will.i.am. Each set of king size sheets has the equivalent of 31 plastic bottles (20-ounce bottles).

Local governments in Arizona will not be able to ban or impose a fee on plastic bags, after Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill into law. The state law prohibits cities and counties from regulating the bags. Ducey provided no explanation to accompany his signature, according to the Arizona Daily Sun.

California regulators negotiated a $1.74 million settlement with a recycling company they said redeemed beverage containers and then sold the material to another company, which redeemed them a second time. After redeeming millions of pounds of plastic and aluminum containers, Alco Metal & Iron Co. resold 487,926 pounds of the aluminum and 496,121 pounds of the plastic to a non-certified recycler, Wan Best Trading of Daly City, a company CalRecycle cannot track down.

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UPDATED: CalRecycle settles beverage container fraud case

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 08:25
UPDATED: CalRecycle settles beverage container fraud case

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 14, 2015

California's CalRecycle has rooted out another defrauder of the state's beverage deposit program.

San Leandro, California-based Alco Metal & Iron Company has agreed to pay the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) $1.74 million for orchestrating a scheme to redeem beverage containers twice. The company has been allowed to continue participating in the state's deposit program on "a Last Chance Reinstatement basis for the next five years."

According to CalRecycle's April 7 announcement, between December 2009 and February 2011 Alco redeemed more than 5 million pounds of aluminum cans and plastic bottles. The company then resold nearly 1 million of those containers to Wan Best Trading, which went on to redeem them a second time.

"The operators of Wan Best Trading are believed to have fled to China," the release states.

In an official response to the settlement, Alco stated it "believed Wan Best Trading would legally export that material outside the country."  Upon learning of Wan Best's actions, Alco says it "fully and thoroughly cooperated" with the investigation and "acknowleged its failure to perform due diligence required by law."

The company's full response can be read here.

The settlement reached with Alco is the latest in a series of actions against supposed bad actors in the state's deposit program. CalRecycle has identified fraud as a significant challenge in attempting to ensure the solvency of the redemption model in California.

"CalRecycle continues taking a major and multi-pronged effort to protect the recycling fund, including new approaches to curb fraud," the release states.

Note: This article has been updated to include the official response of Alco to the settlement.

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Judge lets Indy go forward with mixed-waste processing

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 08:24
Judge lets Indy go forward with mixed-waste processing

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

April 14, 2015

A ruling will allow the City of Indianapolis to move ahead with controversial plans for a mixed-waste processing facility to recover recyclables.

A lawsuit that challenged those plans was dismissed April 6 by Marion County Judge Cynthia Ayers. The ruling was first reported on by the Indianapolis Business Journal.

Indianapolis' mixed-waste strategy includes a 14-year contract with waste-to-energy company Covanta. The company would finance, build and operate a processing facility with the capability of separating recyclable materials from garbage. Such facilities, which are sometimes termed dirty MRFs, have been at the center of industry debate over the past year.

Indianapolis' director of sustainability, Melody Park, welcomed the decision on the Covanta deal, writing in an email that "Indy’s effort to boost recycling rates is moving forward."

"Covanta’s private investment, estimated at $45 million, in the Advanced Recycling Center (ARC) will feature innovative, game-changing recycling technology that will benefit the environment and taxpayers," Park wrote. "The Covanta ARC will work in tandem with the city’s existing curbside and drop-off recycling programs to position Indy as a national leader in sustainability."

Many in the recycling industry, including the Indiana Recycling Coalition (IRC), have opposed the plan on the grounds that it would give the mixed waste processing center a monopoly on the city's MSW and shut out the possibility of developing a robust curbside recycling system.

Carey Hamilton, IRC's executive director, told Resource Recycling her group is "disappointed and awaiting word from the plaintiffs about a possible appeal."

Under the Indianapolis contract, a copy of which was obtained by Resource Recycling, the Covanta facility will be required to divert at least 18 percent of the material it receives. While the contract does allow existing Indianapolis recycling programs to continue, it includes stiff financial penalties for introducing any alternative programs.

Indianapolis residents can currently subscribe to a curbside program through Republic Services. Drop-off recycling is also available.

"If the City grants any contractor the right to implement a recycling program for single family residential households in any part of Marion County, the parties acknowledge that the Company will suffer material damages … equal to $333,333.33 per month, multiplied by the number of months remaining in the then-current term of the Service Agreement," the contract reads.

Paper companies Graphic Packaging International and Rock-Tenn Converting Company along with citizen Cathy Weinmann were plaintiffs on the recent lawsuit. They claimed city officials failed to follow "the statutorily proscribed public process" in awarding the $112 million contract to Covanta without seeking and considering additional bids. Paper companies that use recycled feedstock have been particularly opposed to mixed-waste processing.

Graphic Packaging and Rock-Tenn  said in a brief statement sent to Resource Recycling they were "considering next steps."

In the original lawsuit, the plaintiffs argued the plan would "degrade the recycling stream, harming both the public and the plaintiff companies that rely on recycled waste, and actually creates a disincentive for the City to promote clean recycling."

In her ruling, Ayers found the City acted legally in amending a contract it already held with Covanta. The City has contracted with Covanta since 1985 and previously amended its agreement in 2008.

According to Indianapolis' Park, the facility "should be on-line by fall of 2016."

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RecycleManiacs divert 40,000 tons from landfills in 2015

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 08:20
RecycleManiacs divert 40,000 tons from landfills in 2015

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

April 14, 2015

For the second year in a row, a small Seattle-area university achieved the highest diversion rate in the RecycleMania tournament.

Antioch University Seattle took the Grand Champion award in the 2015 iteration of the event by diverting nearly 97 percent of its waste from landfill. The private college with about 720 students, faculty and staff took the same award in 2014, when it achieved a 93.1 percent diversion rate.

Overall in 2015, more than 40,000 tons of materials were diverted during the competition, which pitted 394 colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada against each other and themselves to recycle more materials and reduce waste. The event is managed by Keep America Beautiful (KAB).

The 2015 winners in categories in the competition division:

  • Grand Champion: Antioch University (96 percent)
  • Per Capita Classic (total pounds recycled per person): Loyola Marymount University (73.9 pounds)
  • Waste Minimization (least overall waste per person): North Lake College (3.3 pounds)
  • Gorilla (most overall pounds recycled): Rutgers University (1,115 tons)
  • Food Service Organics (most overall recycled): Colorado College (14.5 tons)

Loyola Marymount University also took the top award in different types of materials collected per capita. The private college of 10,370 students, faculty and staff recycled 32.4 pounds of paper, 28.1 pounds of corrugated cardboard and 13.4 pounds of bottles and cans, per capita.

In the E-cycleMania category, Southwestern College took first place by recycling 22.2 pounds per person. In the film plastic category, Stanford University took the top award by recycling 0.08 pounds per person, for a total of 2,340 pounds recycled.

New to the 2015 competition was the “3R Actions Challenge,” which encourages students to reduce, reuse and recycle and share those actions via text, Twitter or a mobile app.

The competition, made possible with sponsorship from Alcoa Foundation and the Coca-Cola Co., took place during February and March.

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Compostable single-serve coffee pod announced

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 08:19
Compostable single-serve coffee pod announced

By Jared Paben, Resource Recycling

April 14, 2015

Canadian roaster Club Coffee has developed what it says is the first fully compostable single-serve coffee pod.

Representatives of Club Coffee and other organizations held a press conference in Seattle on April 8 to announce the PurPod100.

The pod works in machines made by Keurig Green Mountain, which controls about 90 percent of the single-serve coffee pod market, the company states. Club Coffee is one of several companies that have sued Keurig, claiming the company uses its monopoly power to keep single-serve coffee prices artificially high. The company has also filed a Competition Bureau complaint in Canada.

In 2014, 27 percent of U.S. households owned a single-serve coffee maker, Club Coffee CEO John Pigott said. And last year, sales reached $4 billion, a 32 percent increase over the year before.

The ring of the PurPod100 is made from coffee chaff, the skin of the bean that comes off during the roasting process. The pod is designed to be digestible by bacteria.

The company is in the process of having the PurPod100 certified by the Biodegradable Products Institute, and Gemmiti said he was "very optimistic" that it would qualify. The company is also seeking other certifications, including for backyard composting, that will make the technology available to consumers across North America.

The U.S. Composting Council has done a preliminary review of the PurePod100 testing data and is very encouraged by the results, said Al Rattie, director of market development for the U.S. Composting Council.

"We’re really looking forward to seeing the final certification and we are very, very confident that that will be as positive as everything we’ve looked at so far,” he said. “Composting is the solution for recycling our organics residuals, period. And this product make that a whole lot easier for both the user and the compost manufacturer."

Club Coffee CEO Pigott said the pods will break down in a commercial composting facility in a matter of weeks.

Recycling of single-serve cups is difficult because consumers need to separate the used grounds from the cup, and the small cups are difficult to capture at materials recovery facilities, so they end up as residual sent to landfill, said Alan Blake, executive director of PAC NEXT, a membership group focused on reducing packaging waste.

 

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 08:18
NewsBits

April 14, 2015

The Carton Council and recycling bin supplier Recycle Away have partnered to provide more than 600 milk and juice carton recycling containers to New York City schools. The bins themselves look like giant cartons.

An emergency rule issued by the state of Washington to protect its apple crop from the infamous apple maggot could put a serious wrinkle in the city of Spokane’s composting program. The rule could prohibit debris from the city’s new curbside yard organics collection program from going to the composting center because it would cross a county line. The facility is one mile over the county line.

Florida’s Palm Beach County this summer will begin counting as recycling material sent to a soon-to-open waste-to-energy facility. That practice is legal under Florida law. According an article in the (Fort Lauderdale) Sun Sentinel, the county “generates twice as much revenue from burning trash than from recycling.”  

Some residents of one Florida county say their new, larger recycling carts are simply too large. A number of residents in Lee County are complaining that the 64-gallon carts are too difficult to store and handle, and they’ve asked for smaller ones.

Bills have been introduced in California, New York and Massachusetts to address product packaging, according to PAC NEXT. Legislation in California would seek to, among other things, promote EPR. In New York, a bill would require packaging meet standards for reduction, reusability and recycled content or recyclability. In Massachusetts, a bill would impose a packaging reduction and recovery fee on producers.

A thermostat recycling program has been launched in Oklahoma, allowing homeowners and contractors to drop-off intact old thermostats at any Locke Supply location free of charge. The thermostats are delivered to Thermostat Recycling Corp. for recycling, according to a press release. An average wall thermostat contains four grams of mercury.

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Industry and supplier news

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 08:16
Industry and supplier news

April 14, 2015

New York City’s Department of Sanitation and Veolia will double the number of events meant for collecting solvents, automotive parts, flammables and electronics, according to a press release. The program, called SAFE, will now hold 10 events each year. For more, click here.

National Recovery Technologies (NRT) has named Jennifer Jones as its new research and development engineer, the company announced. She will work to bring to market new systems and algorithms for materials identification in high-speed sorting environments. For more, click here.

Cascades Recovery and CellMark BC Holdings have formed a joint venture marketing and selling recovered materials generated from four Canadian provinces and the Pacific Northwest in the U.S., according to a press release. The new venture, called CasCell Trading Group, will be headquartered in Surrey, British Columbia. For more, click here.

General Kinematics, makers of vibratory equipment for bulk materials processing, has promoted Thomas P. Musschoot to president of the company. Since starting with the company in 1999, Musschoot has held various positions in marketing, production and sales. For more, click here.

Harris Waste Management Group has hired Dave Beshear as the company’s field service manager. He will be responsible for leading all Harris Field Service efforts in Cordele, Georgia. He most recently served as an engineering support technician for Jacobs ASG. For more, click here.

The Carton Council of North America has received a “Trashies” award from the Sustainable Packaging Coalition and Smithers Pira. The Carton Council won the award under the “Partnership” category. The Trashies are new industry awards included as part of the annual SUSTPACK conference. For more, click here.

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Stone Castle glass causing headaches in Utah

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 07:12
Stone Castle glass causing headaches in Utah

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

April 10, 2015

Millions of pounds of CRT devices abandoned by Utah's Stone Castle Recycling continue to plague local communities.

According to a pair of articles appearing April 5 in the Salt Lake Tribune, six former locations of Stone Castle remain piled high with CRT devices. Company CEO Anthony Stoddard "has not paid for any of his defunct recycling centers or their cleanup," the newspaper states.

Stone Castle closed in 2014 following a string of fires that were examined as potential cases of arson.

A year ago the Basel Action Network issued a blistering report on the state of Stone Castle.

According to Andy Renfro, the owner of a warehouse space leased to Stone Castle in Clearfield, Utah, approximately "3.5 million pounds of television glass" remains stored there. The cost to get the material recycled, Renfro told the paper, is likely $500,000.

Thus far, only one Stone Castle site, located in Parowan, has been cleaned out. EPA Region 8 federal on-scene coordinator Steven Merritt confirmed with E-Scrap News "all the disposal of all treated wastes was finished in January." According to Merritt, the rest of the sites are currently being handled by Utah's Department of Environmental Quality.

And who will pay for cleaning out the sites? "There is no simple answer," Scott Anderson, the director of the Utah Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste, told the Salt Lake Tribune.

"I don't have a pot of emergency-response money," Anderson stated. "That's not how I'm budgeted."

One of Stone Castle's largest upstream suppliers of glass, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and its Deseret Industries thrift store chain, has stated Stone Castle "guaranteed the material would be recycled properly" and thus far has resisted calls by BAN to help fund the cleanup process.

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Keystone State locked up on e-scrap

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 07:10
Keystone State locked up on e-scrap

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

April 10, 2015

Environmental officials in Pennsylvania say manufacturers aren't paying enough to ensure collected electronics are getting recycled.

"The issue here is that the reimbursements being provided by manufacturers are not aligning with the actual costs to recycle the items," Amanda Whitman, spokesperson for the Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), told E-Scrap News.

Under Pennsylvania's e-scrap program, which went into full effect in 2012 and covers computers, computer peripherals and TVs, manufacturers are required to pay "for recycling the amount of covered devices that have an equivalent weight to what they sold two years prior," Whitman explained.

Recently, the amount of collected material has exceeded those goals and the DEP has had to "work with recyclers and manufacturers to ensure the excess material was appropriately managed."

Several other states have experienced similar challenges in over-collection of materials, including New Jersey and Wisconsin.

In some instances, Whitman says manufacturers in Pennsylvania are "selecting to exclude CRTs in their collections and rely on other materials that have positive value to meet their required weight goal under the act."

Whitman told E-Scrap News "manufacturers should include all covered devices in their plan."

A story featured in the Chambersburg, Pennsylvania newspaper Public Opinion highlighted some of the challenges faced by collectors and intermediary recycling firms stuck with CRTs to recycle and no manufacturer funds to cover the costs.

Doug Smith, Sony's director of Corporate, Environment Safety and Health, told E-Scrap News, "Sony operates a compliant system in Pennsylvania."

"Sony operated a CRT recycling facility in conjunction with its TV manufacturing plant just outside of Pittsburgh for years and has put considerable effort into continuing proper recycling of CRTs through strategic contracts," Smith said in a statement.

According to Smith, "the problems described in the [Public Opinion] article are very common in many of the states with take-back laws with the exception of California."

California is the only state electronics recycling program to be funded through point-of-sale consumer fees for new products. All other state programs, including Pennsylvania's, are funded directly by manufacturers of covered products.

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Minnesota bill would amend state e-scrap program

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 07:06
Minnesota bill would amend state e-scrap program

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

April 10, 2015

Minnesota is the latest state to consider updating its e-scrap recycling law.

On March 4, a bill was introduced to state lawmakers, proposing to amend the structure used to determine e-scrap collection requirements for equipment manufacturers. Manufacturers are currently mandated to finance the state's electronics recycling program, and each company's requirement is determined by the volume of equipment they sell into the state annually.

The Product Stewardship Institute included a brief analysis of the proposed legislation in an email update this week, characterizing the change to the manufacturer requirements in the following way: "The new bill would ... change the state's reuse and recycling goals every year in response to changing weights and quantities of electronic products sold and recycled. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency] will publish a new recycling goal each year based on the sum of the average weight of the electronic devices collected for recycling in the preceding two years."

A number of states, including New Jersey and Illinois, have in recent months made similar moves to update their own e-scrap legislation. Many state bills were passed nearly a decade ago, and they didn't fully anticipate the glut of CRT devices and corresponding cost crunch that have hindered the electronics recycling landscape of late.

Minnesota's e-scrap legislation was passed in 2007 and amended in 2009.

The bill introduced this month also proposes to broaden the scope of state's electronics disposal ban. Currently, CRT devices are prohibited from entering the municipal solid waste stream. The bill would add a variety of products to that ban, including cellphones, video game consoles and computers and computer peripherals.

The bill was introduced by Rep. Frank Hornstein, who represents a district in Minneapolis and is a member of the Democratic-Farm-Labor party. It has been referred to the House of Representatives' committee on Environment and Natural Resources Policy and Finances.

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Concerns over federal order excluding EPEAT

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 07:04
Concerns voiced over federal order excluding EPEAT

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

April 10, 2015

An industry advocacy group says President Obama’s recent executive order on federal government sustainability could spell the end of the green electronics standard EPEAT.

The Oakland, California-based Electronics TakeBack Coalition is urging the White House to change its executive order, issued March 19, so that it includes EPEAT.

As written, the order is “the Grim Reaper for EPEAT,” Barbara Kyle, national coordinator of the Electronics TakeBack Coalition, wrote on the group's website.

“We are surprised that Obama administration would want to be known (among other things) as the administration that killed the EPEAT program,” Kyle wrote. “What a shame, after so many years of time and effort by so many people to help the government use its purchasing power to promote sustainability.”

The new order, which does not mention EPEAT, replaced a 2009 order that ensured the federal government gives purchasing preference to electronics registered to EPEAT standards. EPEAT addresses product longevity and recycling by encouraging design that allows for cost-effective reuse and recycling.

The EPEAT program, managed by the Green Electronics Council (GEC), was formed in 2005 as a global rating system for a wide range of electronics. Companies that seek to have their products registered to EPEAT have to hit standards in a wide range of areas, including repairability, end-of-life management and use of recycled content.

“There continues to be head-scratching among the green electronics community about this step by the Obama Administration," GEC's CEO Robert Frisbee commented in a statement sent to E-Scrap News. "The EPEAT Registry has been a very successful part of their environmental initiatives. This move injects uncertainty into purchasing and manufacturing alike. If the U.S. steps out of its leadership role in green electronics, who will step into this fast growing space?"

Kyle wrote a letter calling for changes to the order to Kate Brandt, the federal environmental executive in the White House.

The White House’s Council on Environmental Quality said in a statement to E-Scrap News the order avoids endorsing any non-federal label.

According to the GEC, eight national governments, including the U.S., and hundreds of private and public purchasers around the world use EPEAT ratings in their purchasing decisions.

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E-Scrap 2015: Plug into practical solutions

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 07:01
E-Scrap 2015: Plug into practical solutions

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

April 10, 2015

Start planning now to be sure you and your company are represented at the North American e-scrap industry's biggest business-building and networking conference.

E-Scrap 2015 will offer well-curated sessions covering the topics that matter to electronics processors. Experts will analyze EH&S issues, innovative technologies, refurb hot topics and much more.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Last year's conference brought together more than 1,300 attendees from 35 countries and similar numbers are expected for the upcoming iteration. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.


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Certification Scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 06:58
Certification scorecard

April 10, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

TBS Industries of Philadelphia is now certified to the following standards: ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013.

3N Document Destruction, Inc. of Clifton Park, New York; AAA Certified Confidential Security Corp. of Peoria, Illinois; American Document Destruction of St. Louis; American Document Securities of Carrollton, Georgia; AmeriTex of Houston; A Shred 2 Pieces of Irving, Texas; Commonwealth Document Management, Inc. of Danville, Virginia; DocuGuard of Enid, Oklahoma; Document Shredding & Storage of Amarillo, Texas; EnTrust Records Management of Richmond, Virginia; Pioneer SecureShred of Minneapolis; Shred Ace of Durham, North Carolina; The DocuTeam LLC of San Luis Obispo; Time Shred Services (Shred Services, Inc.) of Hillside, New Jersey; Vanish Document Shredding of Houston; Viking Shred of West Sacramento, California; and Wiggins Shredding, Inc. of West Chester, Pennsylvania have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 06:57
NewsBits

April 10, 2015

Cascade Asset Management has earned accolades from the Indiana state government for its workplace safety and health efforts. The Indianapolis-based e-scrap company picked up certification in the state’s Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program. The company collects between 300 and 400 tons of e-scrap per month from sites across North America.

The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone gets only a 3 out of 10 for repairability, according to iFixit.com. The tech repair site did a tear-down of the new phone to determine whether its design allows for easy reuse of old phones. In comparison, Apple’s iPhone 6 scored a 7 out of 10.

The e-scrap industry is too quick to send reuseable electronics to the shredder for recycling, the CEO of Sage Sustainable Electronics wrote at Environmental Leader. Doing more to ensure repair and reuse is better for the environment and for businesses’ bottom lines, Bob Houghton wrote.

Manufacturers selling electronics and appliances in the U.K. met their target for recycling e-scrap in 2014 after all, new government data shows. Early signs had hinted manufacturers would fall short of the poundages they need to collect and recycle. But after the late submissions of recycling reports, the government now says about 545,000 tons were collected, about 1 percent over the target.

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Oregon officials fine Agilyx PTO site

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 08:08
Oregon officials fine Agilyx PTO site

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

April 8, 2015

Oregon's Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has fined plastics-to-oil company Agilyx for improper storage and labeling of hazardous waste. The company has requested a contested case hearing with the DEQ.

The fine, totaling $46,500, stems from a September 2014 visit to the 701 N. Hunt St. Wastech facility operated by Agilyx in Portland, Oregon. The site has been owned by Waste Management since the mid-1980s and began retooling it in 2011 as a waste-to-oil hub operated by Agilyx, Oregon DEQ records show.

Although Waste Management temporarily shuttered the operation in August of 2014, citing the need for more advanced technology to push along its waste-to-oil operation, a DEQ visit the following month identified several lingering infractions found at the closed plant.

Without a permit to store hazardous waste at the facility, Agilyx kept nine 250-gallon totes and 72 55-gallon drums-worth of various hazardous wastes on the premises, the DEQ notice alleges. Some containers were not properly labeled or closed and others were stored for more than 90 days, the DEQ states.

Given until April 2 to appeal the fine and related violations, Agilyx on March 30 submitted a request for a hearing with the DEQ.

In the hearing request, Agilyx "denies elements of the findings" related to improper storage and labeling of hazardous waste at the facility. The company does admit to failing to have "an up-to-date contingency plan for responding to emergency situations" and a permit to store hazardous waste.

Representatives from Agilyx and Waste Management did not respond to a request for further comment on the matter.

Steve Siegel, an environmental attorney for the DEQ, told Plastics Recycling Update an informal meeting will take place before a hearing is decided on.

The DEQ notice states hazardous waste is no longer at the facility, and it says the "company's efforts to correct the violations" were considered when deciding on the fine amount.

The situation mirrors similar violations at another Agilyx facility, located in Tigard, Oregon, which was fined last year by the DEQ for nearly $50,000.

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PetroChem Wire: Prices rise for HDPE bales

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 08:05
PetroChem Wire: Prices rise for HDPE bales

April 8, 2015

HDPE natural and mixed color post-consumer bale prices rose at the very beginning of April due to tight supply, particularly in the Northeastern U.S.

Natural bales were assessed at 30 to 31 cents per pound and mixed color bales at 29 to 30 cents per pound, both FOB east of the Rockies. Some markets were at a 1 to 2 cents per pound premium to those numbers due to tight supply, the result of reduced winter curbside collection.

Meanwhile, flake and pellet trade was light in the week leading up to Easter weekend, with an increase in prices seen. HDPE post-consumer fractional melt mixed color pellets, for example, sold at 54 to 58 cents per pound FOB southern U.S., up 3 cents per pound from the previous week. In the prime HDPE market, U.S. Gulf spot blow-mold material rose 1.5 cents per pound from March 26 to April 2, reaching 63 cents per pound.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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UPDATED: Plastic bans may be banished in Arizona

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 08:03
UPDATED: Plastic bans may be banished in Arizona

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

April 8, 2015

Arizona lawmakers have approved a bill that outlaws local bans, taxes and fees on a variety of "auxiliary containers," including plastic bags and beverage containers.

Passing the Arizona Senate last Thursday by a vote of 18-11, Senate Bill 1241 now awaits the signature of Republican Gov. Doug Ducey to become law. If signed, it would be the second statewide law to keep municipalities from installing a ban on plastic bags.  Florida has restricted the enactment of a ban on bags and other items since 2008. 

Georgia lawmakers voted down a similar ban last month and Missouri's Senate is currently reviewing a House-approved measure to forbid muncipalities from banning plastic bags.

While recycling of plastic film, including bags, has increased in recent years through retailer drop-off options, plastic bags are not generally accepted in curbside recycling programs. Materials recovery facilities (MRFs) nationwide have reported difficulties with bags clogging recycling equipment and interfering with operations.

Under the Arizona bill, cities and towns throughout the state are banned from banning, taxing or applying a fee to "auxiliary containers," including reusable bags, disposable bags and beverage containers.

"The legislature finds that small businesses are particularly sensitive to the costs and expenses incurred in complying with regulatory actions of a city or town," the legislation states.

Bisbee, about 90 miles southeast of Tucson and home to fewer than 6,000 residents, is the only municipality in Arizona with a bag ban currently in place. Officials in Tempe and Flagstaff have recently contemplated bag bans of their own.

California last year ushered in legislation that is completely opposite to that which has passed in Arizona. The Golden State passed the nation's first statewide ban on bags (though voters will be given an opportunity to overturn it in 2016). Many large cities have enacted local bans on plastic bags – this group includes Chicago; Portland, Ore.; Seattle; and Washington, D.C.

Note:  This story has been updated to clarify that Florida passed a ban on taxing or banning auxillary containers in 2008.  A previous version of this story stated Arizona's law would be the first in the nation.  We regret this error.

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Plastics Recycling 2016: Best in the business

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 08:00
Plastics Recycling 2016: Best in the business

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

April 8, 2015

Next February marks the 11th iteration of the Plastics Recycling Conference, and our event's staying power is a testament to the innovative opportunities and business-boosting environment offered at the conference every year.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is produced by Resource Recycling, Inc., the publisher of Plastics Recycling Update and other recycling journals. Our editorial staff analyzes and investigates plastics recycling like no other organization. And that means the Plastics Recycling Conference is able to bring fresh, objective viewpoints that guide attendees into the sector's current and future profit centers.

In addition, our staff's relationships with individual attendees, recycling firms of all sizes and hotel and logistics groups give the Plastics Recycling Conference an edge when it comes to personalized service, competitive pricing and networking needs.

As you plan your event and trade show calendar for next year, start at Plastics Recycling 2016, the industry conference with a proven track record and a passion for evolution.

Plastics Recycling 2016 is set for Feb. 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, Louisiana. Head to plasticsrecycling.com to register and get all the facts on exhbiting and/or sponsoring.

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