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Certification Scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/11/2014 - 12:16
Certification scorecard

June 12, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Computer Connection CNY, Inc., has achieved R2:2008 and ISO 14001 certifications at its Utica, New York facility.

Green Vision, Inc., of Randolph, New Jersey, achieved R2:2013, OHSAS 18001 and ISO 14001 certification.

T3, located in Rancho Cordova, California, is now certified to the R2:2013, OHSAS 18001 and ISO 14001 standards.

Adirondack Mobile Shredding of Schroon Lake, NY; Integra Certified Document Destruction, LLC of Elkhart, IN; LeMay Mobile Shredding of Lacey, WA and Secure On-Site Shredding, Inc. of McKinney, TX have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/11/2014 - 12:15
NewsBits

June 12, 2014

With Apple set to unveil its first wearable smartwatch this October -- producing 3 million to 5 million devices monthly -- it's beginning to be clear that the e-scrap stream of the future will include a fair amount of wearables. Samsung released a line of smartwatches last year and Apple is looking to the electronic product category for added momentum in 2014.

Al Gore was on hand Tuesday for the groundbreaking ceremony of a new $35 million e-scrap plant located in Osceola, Arkansas. The former vice president is a partner of one of the main investors supporting the building of the plant, which is set to begin operations by the end of 2015 and specialize in rare earth metals extraction.

According to the latest tally, the E-Cycle Washington program has collected about 17.5 million pounds of e-scrap thus far in 2014. That total is 5.1 percent below collection totals through the first five months of 2013 and the program is actively looking into whether collection numbers have peaked or whether they will even out during the course of the year.

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Future uncertain for Indianapolis recycling

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:22
Future uncertain for Indianapolis recycling

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

Indianapolis may be the next American city to usher in a garbage-sorting MRF, though a number of recycling companies and groups are hoping to push the municipality in a different diversion direction.

The Indianapolis Business Journal reported earlier this week New Jersey-based Covanta has submitted a proposal for the construction of a facility that would accept household waste and then sort out recyclable material (such facilities are often referred to as dirty MRFs).  Residents would be instructed to place all material – trash and recyclables – in a single curbside receptacle.

It would be the first such operation in the U.S. developed by Covanta, a company that currently runs a waste incineration plant in Indianapolis.  However, it would continue what some see as recent nationwide momentum for the "dirty" MRF concept.  Montgomery, Alabama earlier this year unveiled a facility that sorts recyclables from curbside-collected municipal solid waste.  Houston and Cleveland leaders have been debating the merits of the strategy for some time.

The idea of such a strategy gaining traction, however, raises serious alarms for many in the recycling industry.  Detractors argue dirty MRFs yield far less usable material than facilities that take in only recyclables from curbside programs. Opponents to mixed waste facilities also say some materials may not get recovered at all at the operations, and the Indiana Business Journal story in fact indicated the proposed Covanta facility would not sort out glass from the waste stream.

Beth Schmitt, global manager of sustainability and recycling at aluminum manufacturer Alcoa, told Resource Recycling dirty MRFs may not provide Alcoa with clean recycled material.

"While Alcoa applauds all efforts to recycle, we have concerns that a single-stream dirty mixed waste processing facility could cause the aluminum cans to become contaminated by solid waste and hinder the ability to turn them into new cans," she said.  "Aluminum is a valuable component of the circular economy.  Because it does not rust, decay, or lose its quality, it can be recycled repeatedly without loss of properties.  But, in order to truly maximize that value we need to separate materials for recycling."

The Indiana Recycling Coalition (IRC) this April submitted a letter to the office of Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, echoing Schmitt's concerns and requesting a six-month delay on any consideration of Covanta's proposal.

"We believe it would set recycling back in Indianapolis and central Indiana for decades to come, despite providing limited improved recycling rates in the near term," Carey Hamilton, the group's executive director, states in the letter.  "We are confident, based on those of us representing the commodity markets, that the Covanta proposal will provide lower quality and lower quantity material compared to a true curbside recycling program."

In a separate letter sent to Mayor Ballard and obtained by Resource Recycling, Ron Gonen, the CEO of the Closed Loop Fund, proposes the city use a zero-interest loan to invest in and develop curbside recycling.  "Please accept this letter as confirmation that the Closed Loop Fund is interested in providing a zero-interest loan to Indianapolis to support the deployment of a curbside recycling program," the letter reads.

The state of Indiana has set a recycling rate goal of 50 percent and Indianapolis, as the state's largest city, will likely be viewed as a key momentum-builder toward reaching the goal.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2014: Registration now open

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:16
Resource Recycling Conference 2014: Registration now open

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

We cordially invite you to the recycling industry's top gathering of high-level decision-makers. Register today for Resource Recycling 2014, set for September in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Resource Recycling 2014 offers unique networking opportunities, valuable education sessions, a bustling trade show and a number of ancillary meetings hosted by industry associations. Leaders from major recycling stakeholders rely on the annual gathering to push their organizations forward, so make sure your firm or group is well represented.

Resource Recycling 2014 offers unique networking opportunities, valuable education sessions, a bustling trade show and a number of ancillary meetings hosted by industry associations. Leaders from major recycling stakeholders rely on the annual gathering to push their organizations forward, so make sure your firm or group is well represented.

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Will Closed Loop Fund appeal be limited by loans?

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:14
Will Closed Loop Fund appeal be limited by loans?

By Dan Leif, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

The $100 million Closed Loop Fund made ripples throughout the recycling industry when it was announced by a team of corporate giants this spring. What remains to be seen, however, is how attractive the effort's loan structure will be to actual municipalities.

The Closed Loop Fund, which is backed by Walmart, Coca-Cola and a handful of other multinational enterprises, was launched in April and has billed itself as a major corporate response to stagnant American recycling rates. "The goal is to divert valuable raw materials from landfill by helping to provide 100 percent of U.S. consumers access to recycling where and when they need it," the Closed Loop Fund states in an informational brochure it created for stakeholders.

The engine for achieving this? Zero interest loans that will be available to communities so that they can have funding available for bin-to-cart transitions, resident outreach initiatives, facility construction and other projects. In the past when recycling coordinators needed funding outside allocated budgets for those kind of efforts, they turned to municipal bonds as well as grants from state or federal government or nonprofit groups that had corporate backing.

The Closed Loop Fund and its loan strategy offers a very different approach. But some municipal representatives say that being on the hook for repayment simply is not an option for their communities.

"If the elected officials here were going to take on debt, it wouldn't be for recycling," James Jackson, director of public works for Richmond, Virginia, told Resource Recycling.

He noted that his city is in fact looking for a way to move more residents from recycling bins to carts but that Richmond leaders are only willing to make debt commitments to fund the highest priority projects. "We have assessed our needs for road maintenance and have identified well over $230 million worth of road improvement needs just to get us at a place where 80 percent of our roads are at rating of good or better," Jackson said. "That makes it difficult for us to say we want to participate in a zero interest loan program for recycling."

However, other leaders say the zero interest play could work for some communities — especially if the loans come in concert with grants or other financial mechanisms.

Some industry members have indicated a loan would be attractive in stuations where there were already plans to spend a large sum to transition from bins to carts over several years. A loan could allow a community to step away from that staggered structure and make the transition in a single leap.

Scott Mouw, state recycling director at North Carolina Division of Environmental Assistance and Outreach, laid out a slightly different scenario he could see happening in many city council meetings in the coming years: "If the recycling staff walks in and says, 'We need $3 million for carts and this group of industry players is willing to give us a $400,000 grant toward that end and for the rest of it we can get a zero percent loan,' that would be a much easier thing for the City Council to say yes to."

In an interview with Resource Recycling, Closed Loop Fund CEO Ron Gonen said such situations are exactly what his group is seeking. "That's our sweet spot," he said. "We don't want to be the sole source of capital for a city."

He added the Closed Loop Fund, which has not actively started seeking municipal partners yet, views itself as a player that will provide loans of between $1 million and $20 million to fund major initiatives. Ideally, he said, smaller organizations will work to provide grants and other funding alongside the loans. And he said the Closed Loop Fund itself has plans for a grant arm, though the sums flowing out of that part of the initiative will be far smaller than the primary loans.

"Solving the recycling issue requires a lot of pieces coming together," Gonen said.

In communication materials the Closed Loop Fund has issued thus far, it has argued that convincing municipal leaders to embrace loans won't be a difficult sell once those leaders calculate the financial gains loan-based improvements will spark. In its brochure, the Fund notes several examples of how a community could leverage its loans and shows the overall revenue gains those example-cities would see as recycling diversion goes up and landfill tip fees go down.

The Fund's logic dictates that as municipalities start reducing their trash costs and increasing commodity revenue, they'll see loans not as a hindrance but as a long-term investment opportunity.

However, individuals who have experience helping communities devise strategies to lift recycling infrastructure say the cost-savings argument only goes so far when it comes to how cities think about loan payback.

"In our experience communities are going to look at their budgets more holistically," Mouw said. "They're going to look at their loan portfolio and find ways to pay loans they have. But they are unlikely to tie the payback to a specific kind of savings or revenue source. All the money tends to go to the same pool."

But Gonen said the early interest among municipalities indicates there are plenty that feel confident a loan play will work for them. "If there aren't any cities in America that are interested in $100 million in zero interest loans to invest in their recycling programs, that's OK," he said. "However, I can tell you there's way more demand than that just in terms of the calls and emails we've gotten from folks. It's very attractive to cities to be able to borrow at zero interest and have the repayment tied to diversion savings and commodity revenue."

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Cleveland gets educational lift

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:12
Cleveland gets educational lift

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

June 11, 2014

As part of its ongoing efforts to enhance educational efforts nationwide, a curbside recycling advocacy group is taking its work to Cleveland.

The City of Cleveland will be teaming up with the Curbside Value Partnership (CVP) to "develop and measure a strategic, education campaign designed to increase recycling at the curb," a press release from CVP states. CVP recently announced a similar public-private partnership with the city of San Diego and will collect and analyze data from both projects using its Emerge Knowledge Re-TRAC Connect data management tool.

Cleveland, which already has single-stream recycling in place, is in the midst of switching to an automated recycling program replete with new, large carts. CVP hopes to help ease the transition through its educational assistance.

"Cleveland is clearly dedicated to improving its residential recycling program," Keefe Harrison, CVP's executive director, said in the release. "Making sure residents are aware and empowered to recycle is the crucial next step."

The campaign is expected to be "comprehensive" in scope and "include marketing, advertising, grassroots, community-level outreach and an enhanced Web and social media presence," the release states.

CVP is also in the midst of rolling out its recently announced Recycling Partnership program. Initially spearheaded by the Southeast Recycling Development Council, the partnership is now under CVP's lead and will focus on developing public-private recycling partnerships in municipalities.

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NewsBits

Resource Recycling Magazine - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 12:08
NewsBits

June 11, 2014

Despite continued state-level interest in diverting food scraps, anaerobic digesters are in short supply. A Wall Street Journal article takes a look at the challenges various states and communities are facing in meeting ordinances and developing the infrastructure needed to sustain long-term food diversion programs.

Is there anything Girl Scouts can't do? This year's winner of the third annual Great Can RoundUp Scout Council Challenge, Girls Scouts of Kansas Heartland, collected an impressive 32,199 pounds of aluminum cans between Jan. 15 and April 30. Winning more than $16,000 as a result, the funds will go toward scout activities and programming in 2014 and beyond.

After an investigation last year found public schools in the city of Pittsburgh were sending sorted recyclables, including cardboard, bottles and cans, to area landfills, a follow-up investigation by CBS affiliate KDKA concludes that school recycling is now "spotty at best." Schools have made in-roads by providing recycling receptacles and collection services to all schools, but the report finds that recycling remains optional despite a local push for mandatory recycling.

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NAPCOR isn't sold on delabeling "solutions"

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 16:56
NAPCOR isn't sold on delabeling "solutions"

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

June 5, 2014

An association that represents the PET processing industry is making it known that recycling bottles with full wrap shrink labels continues to be a challenge, and it says label manufacturers should be held accountable.

Calling delabeling equipment an "expensive and complex solution," the National Association for PET Container Resources (NAPCOR) has issued an official position statement on the heated topic, arguing that recycling containers with full wrap shrink labels – those that cover the entire surface area of containers – has caused reclaimers "tens of millions of dollars in costs annually."

"Adding equipment into the PET reclamation process is not an equitable or cost-neutral proposition," Rick Moore, NAPCOR's executive director, told Plastics Recycling Update in a follow-up statement. "Let’s be clear: The cost of innovation cannot fall squarely on the reclamation sector."

Acknowledging the marketing advantages the labels afford the beverage industry, NAPCOR wants labeling companies to simply focus on making labels more recyclable – and doing so on their own dime.

The status quo, NAPCOR says, where reclaimers are being asked to purchase separate delabeling equipment to remove the labels successfully from containers, isn't sustainable or equitable. "Handling bottles with full wrap shrink labels adds 2 to 4 cents per pound of material – not just the pounds of full wrap shrink bottles, but all PET," the position paper reads.


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Plastics exports see 18 percent year-over-year gain

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 16:55
Plastics exports see 18 percent year-over-year gain

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

June 5, 2014

The most recent figures show exports of scrap plastics bounced back from 2013 levels.

March saw a rise of 13.8 percent from February 2014 export levels, with 397.04 million pounds of scrap plastics exported in March 2014. When matched against March 2013 levels – a time during which China's Operation Green Fence was almost at its peak – the volume of plastic scrap exports was also up, by 18.0 percent.

The weighted price of recovered plastic exports in March, at 19.68 cents per pound, was flat, up by just 1.4 percent from its February 2014 standing. When compared with its year-over-year (YOY) level, the price was down by 7.9 percent.

Through March, at 1.10 billion pounds, the volume of recovered plastics exported was up 2.2 percent from its 2013 year-to-date (YTD) figure. At 19.48 cents per pound, however, the average price through February was down 3.5 percent from its 2013 YTD standing.

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET prices hold steady in late May

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 16:54
PetroChem Wire: Recycled PET prices hold steady in late May

June 5, 2014

Relatively balanced supply and demand kept U.S. recycled PET flake and pellet prices stable in May.

The price for PET clear, high-grade flake hovered in the 60 to 65 cents per pound range from mid to late-May. Recycled PET pellet, clear FDA grade, ended May up a half cent per pound at 79 to 81 cents per pound.

In the spot prime bottle-grade PET market, product delivered Midwest via rail, dropped 1.5 cents per pound to 70 to 71 cents per pound in the second half of May due to over-supply of both domestic and import material. Prime PET prices in the U.S. are down nearly 10 percent, or 7.5 cents per pound, since the beginning of the year.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.


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Japan uses 80 percent of its plastics discards

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 16:52
Japan uses 80 percent of its plastics discards

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

June 5, 2014

Japanese consumers and businesses used 10.2 million tons of plastics in 2012, reports the country’s Plastic Waste Management Institute. Some 80 percent of this material was either recycled, gasified or used as a fuel.

Japan relies heavily on nonrecycling recovery systems, as only 22 percent of plastics discards were mechanically recycled. A whopping 42 percent of plastic waste was incinerated to make power or heat.

About 12 percent was converted into fuels, including fuel used in cement making, and 4 percent was liquefied or gasified.

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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 16:48
NewsBits

June 5, 2014

Coca-Cola has teamed up with an ad agency in China to create a campaign in which 16 different cap designs allow consumers to turn soda bottles into objects such as paint brushes and spray bottles after the drink is consumed. The 2nd Lives attachments are being offered for free to around 40,000 consumers in Indonesia and Thailand when they make their beverage purchases.

A young Dutch innovator, who recently developed plans for a modular cell phone, has launched an effort to bring plastics recycling into the garage of any handy consumer. Dave Hakkens' Precious Plastics offers open-source plans for easy-to-build machinery that opens the door to small-scale processing of commonly discarded plastic materials.

Recycling Reinvented, a group that advocates for more extended producer responsibility strategies, has issued a statement that "salutes" the move by Walmart and other corporate giants to inject capital into the national recycling infrastructure. But the statement also explains there are some limitations in the strategy.

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Sims Recycling Solutions closes New Jersey facility

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 14:53
Sims Recycling Solutions closes New Jersey facility

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

June 5, 2014

Just weeks after news broke Sims Recycling Solutions would be closing its Dallas facility, the firm confirmed it is also shuttering its Edison, New Jersey e-scrap processing site.

Steve Skurnac, Sims Recycling Solutions' president, told E-Scrap News the company had stopped receiving materials at its Edison facility June 1. The closure was tied to a changing marketplace and a need to consolidate operations, Skurnac said

"In response to advances in the electronics market, Sims has invested in new technologies and services such as mobile repair facilities and new on-site hard drive shredding," Skurnac said in a statement. "By consolidating the number of locations where Sims processes traditional electronic scrap, the company will be able to continue investing in cutting edge solutions to meet our customer’s ever-changing needs."

According to a database compiled by E-Scrap News, the Edison facility, opened in December 2010, was 93,000 square feet and employed 25 workers.

Material from Edison, Skurnac explained, will be making the 160-plus mile trip south to Sims' Baltimore-area facility for processing.

County officials in Middlesex, where Edison is located, first confirmed the closure with E-Scrap News. In 2013, the county collected nearly 3 million pounds of e-scrap – all of which was serviced by Sims' Edison facility, officials said.

County officials stated the facility would officially close July 7, 2014.

In addition to servicing the Edison community, Sims' New Jersey e-scrap facility serviced the metro New York City area, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, according to the company's website.

The news comes less than a month after the Dallas Business Journal revealed Sims Recycling Solutions, a division of the publicly traded Sims Metal Management, would be closing its Dallas facility and laying off 45 workers.

Another multi-facility e-scrap recycling firm, Creative Recycling Solutions, has also recently moved to close operations.

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E-Scrap 2014: A great chance to boost your brand

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 13:53
E-Scrap 2014: A great chance to boost your brand

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 5, 2014

E-Scrap 2014 is the must-attend conference for the electronics recycling industry, and by signing on as a an exhibitor and/or sponsor, you'll put your brand in front of hundreds of potential customers.

The 2013 conference attracted over 1,200 attendees from 43 states and 29 countries, and the tradeshow floor bustled with over 125 exhibitors. More than ever, it is important to not lose personal contract with your clients and prospects.

Sponsoring and/or exhibiting is the perfect opportunity to reach executives at original equipment manufacturers; generators of e-scrap; federal, state and local government officials; trade association leaders; e-scrap processors; and buyers of e-scrap parts and materials. The exhibit hall is filling up fast. Secure your spot today.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. Get all the latest information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring at e-scrapconference.com.

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Globally focused organization replaces R2 Solutions

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 13:52
Globally focused organization replaces R2 Solutions

By Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

June 5, 2014

The administrators of the R2 standard today introduced a new organizational structure that they say will help open the door to safer handling of used electronics in developing nations.

R2 Solutions, the group that up until now has administered the R2 certification, is dissolving to make way for an organization called SERI (Sustainable Electronics Recycling International). John Lingelbach, who led R2 Solutions and is now SERI's executive director, said the R2 certification and all other R2 Solutions assets are being transferred to the new group.

"Our primary focus remains the R2 Standard – its administration and promotion," Lingelbach told E-Scrap News. "We will not be reducing the level of effort or service we put into the R2-specific work. Beyond this, having the standard housed in an organization that does more to advance responsible electronics recycling around the world will increase awareness and the stature of the certification."

The R2 certification is one of two major North American standards employed by e-scrap recycling organizations to verify their operations follow best practices in the environmental, health and safety (EHS) realm – e-Stewards is the other main industry standard. According to a SERI press release, more than 540 facilities in 17 countries currently hold R2 certification.

But while the vast majority of those R2 facilities are located in North America and other wealthier areas across the globe, the shift to SERI seems to have been driven in large part by a desire among Lingelbach and other R2 leaders to influence policy and practices in less-developed nations. The move also provides the funding structure to make such projects a reality.

The SERI website, which went live today, outlines projects the group is undertaking in Kenya and India, two nations that have not traditionally been pegged as e-scrap dumping grounds but which are generating large tonnages of old electronics and which don't have many formal reuse and recycling procedures in place.

The Kenya initiative is already underway, Lingelbach told E-Scrap News. SERI is working with two e-scrap companies in the African nation and working to analyze how their operations can be improved from environmental and worker safety perspectives. U.S.-based auditing firm Greeneye Partners is assisting on the effort.

In India, SERI is set to begin a partnership with Switzerland-based Sofies SA, a firm that helps bring environmentally focused practices into industrial applications. Sofies has a branch in the Indian city of Bangalore, and SERI's goal with the partnership is to develop EHS guidelines for small and medium-sized electronics recyclers in the country.

"Kenya has the only e-recycling facilities we are aware of in Africa, other than South Africa, that are already in a position to develop and utilize EHS management systems," Lingelbach said. "In India, we were approached about doing a project with smaller companies that want to do the 'right thing' but don’t have sufficient capital to get certified. We anticipate work in Nigeria and China, and potentially Ghana. We just haven’t gotten there yet."

Lingelbach said the immediate goal in India and Kenya will be establishing guidelines and procedures for processors. Rolling out the actual R2 standard in those markets may come at a later time. It's worth noting that three Indian companies already hold R2 certification.

Lingelbach also noted financial strategy played a major part in the decision to dissolve R2 Solutions and launch SERI. Both organizations were built as nonprofit groups, but R2 Solutions was classified as a 501(c)(4), a broad category and one which does not allow for charitable contributions made to groups to be tax deductible for the contributor.

SERI, on the other hand, was formed as a 501(c)(3) organization, which means it can accept funding from foundations. This fact will likely help SERI land funding for global initiatives.

"It is an important piece of the change because it will enable us to support financially the work that goes beyond administering and promoting the R2 Standard," Lingelbach said.

According to the SERI website, the group will also aim to advance e-scrap education in markets worldwide.

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Wide world of e-scrap recycling

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 13:51
Wide world of e-scrap recycling

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 5, 2014

A U.K. mobile device recycling firm expands, and a Reuters photo essay explores crude electronics processing in China. Those stories lead our global look at the industry.

A photojournalist from Reuters has set out to document the underground e-scrap trade in the outskirts of Beijing. In a series of photographs and an accompanying essay published on Wednesday, Kim Kyung-Hoon takes a look at Dongxiaokou, a town whose residents rely on repairing and salvaging discarded e-scrap seven days a week and without any safety protocols in place.

U.K. mobile device recycling firm Redeem announced it has purchased two Spanish companies, Mobilepoint and Insitu Moviles. In a press release, Redeem's CEO said the acquisition allows the company to expand deeper into Europe.

A recent study on the rising tide of e-scrap in Latin America cites data suggesting that by next year the region will account for 9 percent of the world's annual e-scrap generation. With the increase in supply of end-of-life devices, Latin America has also stepped up its recycling efforts, the study says, especially in the mobile device industry.

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PC shipments continue hobbled trajectory

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 13:50
PC shipments continue hobbled trajectory

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 5, 2014

With first quarter results in, worldwide PC shipment numbers appear to be in line with past projections.

According to new data released by the International Data Corporation (IDC), PC shipments during 2014 are expected to be down 6.1 percent compared with 2013 totals. Despite a somewhat resurgent mature market for PCs, the trend of consumers choosing tablets and smartphones, IDC says, continues to keep PC shipments down.

"The transition toward mobile and cloud-based computing is unstoppable," Loren Loverde, Worldwide PC Trackers' vice president," said in a press release. "PCs continue a slow transition toward touch and slim designs, even as tablet volume is expected to pass total PC volume in the fourth quarter of 2014 and on an annual basis in 2016."

The figures on shipments of PCs and other devices are relevant to the e-scrap industry because such statistics indicate what processors' material mix will look like several years from now.

To regain some semblance of growth, Loverde says PC manufacturers will have to take a page out of the tablet and smartphone design and interface formula. "To return to growth, the PC industry is going to need to accelerate the shift to lower-cost, thin, and touch-based designs, despite the challenges it has faced with these designs in the past," Loverde stated.

Global shipments of PC units are expected to fall to 296.3 million in 2014, with 2018 estimates suggesting shipments will come in at 287.3 million units.

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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 13:48
Certification scorecard

June 5, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Cooks Mobile Shredding of Memphis, Tennessee; Crown Shredding LLC of Winter Haven, Florida; Safeguard Destruction Services of Fort Myers, Florida; Secure Document Solutions of Independence, Missouri; Secure Shredding, Inc. of Ft. Myers, Florida and Shred Works, Inc. of Oakland, California have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 13:46
NewsBits

June 5, 2014

As part of a recent U.S. EPA initiative called the Federal Green Challenge, 400 federal offices and other work sites sent 1,756 tons of end-of-life electronics to certified recycling firms. The effort ran throughout 2013.

Electronics buy-back company Gazelle says consumers have sent in more than 2 million devices since 2007. The online-based platform -- offering consumers cash for their used electronics -- has paid out more than $170 million in the process, refurbishing and reselling devices abroad and generating $100 million in revenues in 2013 alone.

During its T-Mobile All-Star Fanfest festivities in Minneapolis next month, Major League Baseball will be working with the Minnesota Twins to host a mobile device recycling drive.

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