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ERI, Wharton School forge learning partnership

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 21:46
ERI, Wharton School forge learning partnership

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

Jan. 15, 2015

A partnership between one of the nation’s top business schools and one of the largest e-scrap companies aims to yield real-world solutions to electronics recycling problems.

The Wharton School’s Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (IGEL) has partnered with Electronic Recyclers International (ERI). The Wharton School is part of the University of Pennsylvania.

“To me, what greater opportunity and honor could there be than this?” John Shegerian, ERI chairman and CEO, said in an interview. “The next generation of sustainability leaders are at great educational institutions like Wharton. So there’s no greater opportunity than for me to have a role there and have a chance to further evangelize [about] e-waste recycling and all the benefits when it comes to energy, resource management and resource retention and cyber security and corporate responsibility.”

The goal isn’t just to inspire the next generation of sustainability leaders, but to hire some of them when they graduate, according to Shegerian.

“The next generation is so on fire for sustainability and what that means for making the world a better place,” he said.

Through the partnership, the organizations will share information with each other, as well as analyze ERI’s innovations. ERI plans to invite students to tour a facility. The only monetary exchange will be ERI’s plans to hire professors to help produce white papers, according to Shegerian.

Shegerian has also been given a seat on the IGEL Advisory Board.

Partnerships with industry leaders are essential to IGEL’s research, teaching and thought-leadership efforts, Joanne Spigonardo, senior associate director of business development at IGEL, stated in a press release.

“This collaboration can yield practical real-world results and cutting edge solutions for problems ranging from curbing the glut of e-waste entering our waste stream to digital security to electronic recycling best practices in general,” she said.

According to Shegerian, the partnership began not from the top down, but from the bottom up. A year ago, he was in a business meeting with a potential client, who brought along three interns, all from Wharton. He started talking with them, and they followed up with him after the meeting. They introduced him to Spigonardo and urged a partnership with the school.


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PC market continues downward spell

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 21:43
PC market continues downward spell

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Jan. 15, 2015

Despite strong showings from top device makers, worldwide shipments of PCs failed to improve in 2014.

According to research firm IDC, global shipments of PCs during the year fell by 2.1 percent and totaled 308 million units. Those numbers are roughly in line with last week's projections by Gartner, which reported 318 million units shipped in 2014.

2014 marks the third consecutive year of declining volumes, IDC analysts say, with tablet and smartphone markets continuing to chip away at demand for PCs. Such trends indicate a future e-scrap stream dominated by mobile devices.

Four of the top five market leaders in the PC arena did see year-over-year growth. Lenovo, with close to 60 million units shipped in 2014, continued to lead the pack in overall shipments and saw a 10.1 percent boost during the year. HP, a close second to Lenovo in overall shipments, shipped almost 57 million units in 2014, good for an 8.9 percent growth rate. Dell, approaching 42 million units shipped, notched 10.3 percent growth.

Acer Group, representing the fourth most popular vendor in volume, was the only market leader to see volumes drop, shipping just over 24 million units in 2014, or 1.6 percent below 2013 totals. Rounding out the top five list, Apple saw the biggest gains of the year, with nearly 20 million units shipped, 15.7 percent higher than in 2013.

PC companies outside of the top five, IDC research shows, were hit hardest in 2014, accounting for a third of overall device shipments but 17.5 percent fewer than in 2013.

By region, the U.S. and Europe reported growth in 2014, IDC's report suggests, while Asian, Pacific and Japanese markets continued to see year-over-year declines.


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Certification scorecard

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 21:35
Certification scorecard

Jan. 15, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Access in Jacksonville, Florida; Access in Kona, Hawaii; Commercial Records Center of El Paso, Texas; Document and Network Technologies of Fenton, Missouri; and UltraShred Technologies, Inc. in Jacksonville, Florida have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Materials Processing Corporation in Mendota Heights, Minnesota has earned its NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.


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NewsBits

E-Scrap News Magazine - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 21:31
NewsBits

Jan. 15, 2015

Increased recycling of rare earth minerals is threatening China’s monopoly on production of the elements, which are used in everything from smartphones to fishing reels. Other factors quickly reshaping the rare earth sector include the opening of new mines as well as the use of alternative materials and smuggling operations, according to a story by Adam Minter of Bloombergview.com.

A new study found that a majority of counties in Illinois are harmed by the expense of recycling CRTs, according to Pantagraph.com. Of the counties that responded to a survey, nearly one-quarter said they absorbed the additional costs of recycling CRTs in their budgets, and nearly one-third reduced collection locations and events to compensate. Meanwhile, a change to state law has been proposed that would require electronics manufacturers to pay 100 percent – up from the 70 percent – of an electronics recycling goal.

At least one New York recycling company is enjoying a recently enacted law that makes it illegal to throw electronics into the trash. Maven Technologies reported that it is seeing an increase in people recycling electronics since the law went into effect at the beginning of the year. Last year, the company recycled more than 20 million pounds of electronics.

Electronics recycling company 3S International in March will begin operations out of a 68,000-square-foot property in the Detroit, Michigan area. The company uses a recycling technology called Blubox to shred complex electronics, remove toxins and separate materials for resale. 3S International representatives said Blubox, which it developed along with MBT Recycling, was born from the growing volume of flat panel displays and lamps containing mercury entering the waste stream. The company plans to begin operating out of the facility in March.

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Oregon plastics recovery drops after record high year

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 21:41
Oregon plastics recovery drops after record high year

By Jared Paben, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 14, 2015

Oregon recovered 4.4 percent less plastic from its waste stream in 2013 than it did during the historically high year before, according to a state report.

A recently released Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) report showed 54,884 tons of plastics were recovered from the municipal waste stream in 2013, down from 57,403 tons the year before.

Peter Spendelow, materials management specialist at DEQ, said he didn’t know exactly why plastics recycling decreased, but “the most logical explanation would be it was associated with the Green Fence in China.”

Operation Green Fence, the customs enforcement action which spanned from February to November in 2013, was an effort by China to reduce imports of lower quality plastic bales. The customs crackdown sent ripples throughout the North American plastics recycling sector.

“If they don’t have a market for it and China isn’t accepting it anymore, they probably simply turned around and got rid of some of the stuff that was already collected,” he said.

In 2013, decreases were seen across all four of the tracked plastics recycling categories: composite plastic, plastic film, other plastics and rigid plastic containers. Various types of beverage containers are included in the rigid plastic containers category.

The weight of plastics recovered in 2012 was the highest since the state began tracking in 1992, largely because of a 26.7 percent increase in film recycling versus the year prior. While film volumes dropped slightly in Oregon in 2013, the total was still well above historical levels, coming in at 14,583 tons.

Spendelow noted that increased availability of bag drop-offs could be contributing to high numbers. Some decreases in film recycling volumes might be expected because Portland, Oregon's largest city, has enacted a ban on plastic bags. But Spendelow urged keeping the bag ban in perspective: Portland represents only about 15 percent of the state’s population, and bags are only a portion of films.

“A lot of the film recycled isn’t plastic bags,” he said. “Much of it is stretch wrap, dry cleaner bags, furniture bags. You have there people generating a lot of clean commercial film.”

Oregon’s recovery rate includes materials recycled, burned for energy recovery and composted.

The state’s overall recovery rate hit a record high 53.9 percent in 2013.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: Time running out for discounted hotel rate

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 21:31
Plastics Recycling 2015: Time running out for discounted hotel rate

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 14, 2015

To get the most out of the upcoming Plastics Recycling Conference, be sure to stay at the host hotel, the Hyatt Regency Dallas at Reunion. All the conference events will be taking place at the Hyatt Regency – by booking your room there, you'll ensure your place at the center of the networking and deal-making action.

Up until Jan. 30, attendees can book a room at the Hyatt at the discounted rate of $198 plus taxes. However, once that date passes – or the conference room block sells out – room prices will increase. Act now and book your hotel room here.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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NYC: Curbside foam can't be recycled

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 21:19
NYC: Curbside foam can't be recycled

By Bobby Elliott, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 14, 2015

In a controversial move, New York City has banned foam foodservice products on the grounds that they cannot be efficiently recycled through a curbside collection system.

"After consultations with corporations, including Dart Container Corporation, nonprofits, vendors and other stakeholders, the Department of Sanitation (DSNY) has determined that expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam cannot be recycled, which led to the ban," the city announced in a Dec. 8 press release. "DSNY has also determined that there currently is no market for post-consumer EPS collected in a curbside metal, glass and plastic recycling program."

It is widely known that post-consumer EPS can be recycled for use in picture frames and a variety of other products, and most communities that offer EPS collection do so through a drop-off format. While ban opponent Dart Container had secured an Indianapolis-based buyer for the New York City material, DSNY internal documents show the agency was not convinced of the long-term viability of an alternative plan to collect all polystyrene items curbside.

The ban was presented as an environmental victory by the city's mayor, Bill de Blasio, who had first proposed to outlaw select foam products in 2007 when he was a member of City Council.

"By removing nearly 30,000 tons of expanded polystyrene waste from our landfills, streets and waterways, today's announcement is a major step towards our goal of a greener, greater New York City," de Blasio said in a statement.

Starting July 1, establishments throughout New York City will no longer be able to offer or sell foam food service products, such as cups and clamshell takeout trays. Foam packing peanuts will also be banned and compostable plates will be the new norm at the city's public school cafeterias. All other rigid polystyrene products will continue to be landfilled.

The decision was challenged by foam manufacturer Dart, which lobbied hard against the ban and pushed for the addition of all PS to the city's curbside recycling program.

"In the year since the ban was first proposed, foam manufacturers like Dart were given an opportunity to prove that foam foodservice items could be economically and logistically recycled within the city’s five boroughs," a press release from Dart reads. "Dart conducted real world tests that unequivocally proved this feasibility."

The foam ban was approved by City Council members in late 2013, but it included a compromise that gave Dart and others a year to prove recycling foam curbside could be effective within the city. The DSNY had until Jan. 1 to make a decision on whether to push through the ban or go with Dart's alternative proposal.

The decision to ban, as outlined in a letter to de Blasio from DSNY Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, came down to several reservations administrators had regarding Dart's proposed recycling plan and timeline for recycling curbside PS and EPS.

The City estimates roughly 60,000 tons of polystyrene products enter the waste stream each year, with about half that total being EPS.

Under Dart's plan, all PS and EPS would have been collected curbside by DSNY, optically sorted and baled by Sims Municipal Recycling and sold to Plastics Recycling, Inc. (PRI) in Indianapolis. Dart agreed to fund the addition of sorters at Sims' Brooklyn MRF and the expansion of PRI's facility. In addition, Dart secured a five-year guarantee from PRI to buy New York City's post-consumer PS, including foam foodservice packaging.

But Garcia's letter shows city leaders felt putting such an infrastructure in place would take too much time. DSNY contends the addition of sorters at Sims' facility would take up to two years to complete. "As such, EPS would not be recycled until late 2016 or early 2017," Garcia's letter states.

In addition, PRI's necessary expansion wouldn't be completed until "late spring 2015," DSNY says. According to the letter, question marks continue to surround the company's ability to process post-consumer PS and EPS.

And, Garcia warns, if PRI were to decide after five years to ditch the endeavor, DSNY and Sims "would still have to manage the costs and complications of having designated EPS as recyclable."

However, a representative from PRI maintained in an interview that EPS recycling from curbside is very much a viable solution for the company.

"Post-consumer foam is a growing market, there's more demand for it than there ever has been," Brandon Shaw, PRI's marketing manager, told Plastics Recycling Update. "People are just told it can't be recycled and they believe it, but we do it every day. The new plant just allows us to do it more efficiently and on a larger scale"

According to Shaw, the company already recycles 60 million pounds of PS per year. A third of that total is post-consumer and mostly garnered from drop-off sites, Shaw said.

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Wide world of plastics recycling

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 21:07
Wide world of plastics recycling

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 14, 2015

A U.K. industry group makes headway on a study on the ways black PET food service trays can be better identified and sorted at processing facilities. We color in the details in our global rundown.

U.K.-based waste prevention group WRAP tells Plastics Recycling Update results from a study on using a new colorant in black PET trays is slated for a February release. The colorant was incorporated into food service trays used by major U.K. grocery stores during the summer and aimed at improving the detectability of the trays at materials recovery facilities.

Liquidators are working to sell equipment from the now-defunct plastics recycling company GFSL. The U.K.-based firm had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons and was processing about 20,000 tons of rigid plastics per year. Click here to see photos and a video of the firm’s equipment.

A German plastics recycling firm is planning a $9.54 million expansion to its facility. MTM Plastics is already building two additional logistics facilities as part of the expansion of a warehouse, work that is scheduled to be completed by the end of February. In addition, over the next five years, MTM Plastics plans to build a second plant.

 

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PetroChem Wire: Recycled PE weakens in New Year

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 20:59
PetroChem Wire: Recycled PE weakens in New Year

Jan. 14, 2015

Prices for recycled HDPE softened during the first two weeks of January, reflecting weakening prime and off-grade HDPE as well as a seasonal demand slowdown.

Weakening demand has been met with ample supply due to steady recycling rates. HDPE dairy pellets (homopolymer) were sold in early January at 71.5 to 76 cents per pound FOB southern U.S., down 3.5 to 4 cents per pound from late 2014. LDPE pricing was weaker too, with film grade pellets offered at 42 to 45 cents per pound attracting little buying interest.

In California markets, PC HDPE gray/natural pellets, 50/50 mix, were offered last week at 62 cents per pound FOB Los Angeles/Long Beach, down as much as 8 cents per pound from business done in December.

U.S. domestic prime HDPE, blow molding, dropped from just below 80 cents per pound in early December to 69 cents per pound on Jan. 12.

For a free trial to the Repro/Regrind Resin Report or to see sample issues of all PCW reports visit the PetroChem Wire website at >www.petrochemwire.com. You can also contact Cindy Bryan at cindy@petrochemwire.com or (713) 385-1407.

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Plastics Recycling 2015: Analyzing plastics-to-oil opportunities

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 20:54
Plastics Recycling 2015: Analyzing plastics-to-oil opportunities

By Editorial Staff, Plastics Recycling Update

Jan. 14, 2015

Member companies of the newly established Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance will grace the stage at Plastics Recycling 2015 to dig deep into the current state of PTO in the recycling landscape.

Is this sector truly on the verge of explosive growth? The American Chemistry Council has stated PTO technology has the power to generate up to $9 billion in annual U.S. economic output, and this session will look into strategies that aim to make such growth a reality.

PTO could be an opportunity to divert millions more tons of non-recycled plastics each year, so this is a conversation you can’t afford to miss.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. More than 1,775 attendees from 30 countries were on hand at the 2014 edition, and a similar turnout is expected in Dallas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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NewsBits

Plastics Recycling Update Magazine - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 20:43
NewsBits

Jan. 14, 2015

Lobbyists for the beverage industry are once again pushing changes to Maine’s 38-year-old bottle bill, according to this post from the Portland Press Herald. Bottle bill opponents in 2011 tried to get lawmakers to exempt large bottles from the deposit law, but the effort failed. Now, the industry has a new proposal regarding large bottles, although details weren’t available.

A recycling group in Pennsylvania has helped launch a year-round program to collect and recycle expanded polystyrene. The Pennsylvania Resource Council and NOVA Chemicals have launched the the program with three drop sites in the Pittsburgh area.

The owner of a Kansas plastics recycling company pleaded guilty to negligent exposure to a hazardous air pollutant, after he illegally dumped paints and solvents on his company’s grounds. Brian Riley of Andover reportedly had the materials dumped after realizing the state was investigating Integrated Plastics Solutions’ waste handling. He was ordered to pay $118,000 to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and he’ll be sentenced March 30.

In the San Jose, California area, some plastic bags that are collected for recycling end up on the side of highways anyway. Some readers of the San Jose Mercury News discussed the problem of unsecured loads from trucks hauling recyclables in this Q&A.

 

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NYC: Curbside foam can't be recycled

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:53
NYC: Curbside foam can't be recycled

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

In a controversial move, New York City has banned foam foodservice products on the grounds that they cannot be efficiently recycled through a curbside collection system.

"After consultations with corporations, including Dart Container Corporation, nonprofits, vendors and other stakeholders, the Department of Sanitation (DSNY) has determined that expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam cannot be recycled, which led to the ban," the city announced in a Dec. 8 press release. "DSNY has also determined that there currently is no market for post-consumer EPS collected in a curbside metal, glass and plastic recycling program."

While ban opponent Dart Container had secured an Indianapolis-based buyer for the material, DSNY internal documents show the agency was not convinced of the long-term viability of an alternative plan to collect all polystyrene items curbside.

The ban was framed as an environmental victory by the city's mayor Bill de Blasio, who had first proposed to outlaw select foam products in 2007 when he was a member of City Council.

"By removing nearly 30,000 tons of expanded polystyrene waste from our landfills, streets, and waterways, today's announcement is a major step towards our goal of a greener, greater New York City," de Blasio said in a statement.

Starting July 1, establishments throughout New York City will no longer be able to offer or sell foam food service products, such as cups and clamshell takeout trays. Foam packing peanuts will also be banned and compostable plates will be the new norm at the city's public school cafeterias. All other rigid polystyrene products will continue to be landfilled.

The decision was challenged by foam manufacturer Dart, which lobbied hard against the ban and pushed for the addition of all PS to the city's curbside recycling program.

"In the year since the ban was first proposed, foam manufacturers like Dart were given an opportunity to prove that foam foodservice items could be economically and logistically recycled within the city’s five boroughs," a press release reads. "Dart conducted real world tests that unequivocally proved this feasibility."

As the Dart release notes, the foam ban was approved by City Council members in late 2013, but included a compromise that gave Dart and others a year to prove recycling foam curbside could be effective within the city. The DSNY had until Jan. 1 to make a decision on whether to push through the ban or go with Dart's alternative proposal.

The decision to ban, as outlined in a letter to de Blasio from DSNY Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, came down to several reservations administrators had Dart's proposed recycling plan and timeline for recycling curbside PS and EPS.

The city estimates roughly 60,000 tons of polystyrene products enter the waste stream each year, with about half that total constituting EPS.

Under Dart's plan, all PS and EPS would have been collected curbside by DSNY, optically sorted and baled by Sims Municipal Recycling and sold to Plastics Recycling Inc. (PRI) in Indianapolis. Dart agreed to fund the addition of sorters at Sims' Brooklyn MRF and the expansion of PRI's facility. In addition, Dart secured a five-year pact with PRI to guarantee a buyer for New York City's post-consumer PS, including foam foodservice packaging.

But Garcia's letter shows city leaders felt putting such an infrastructure in place would take too much time. DSNY contends the addition of sorters at Sims' facility would take up to two years to complete. "As such, EPS would not be recycled until late 2016 or early 2017," Garcia's letter states.

In addition, PRI's necessary expansion to take on the material is not expected to be completed until "late spring 2015," DSNY says. According to the letter, question marks continue to surround the company's ability to process post-consumer PS and EPS.

Calling the PRI addition "a first of its kind in scale and operation," DSNY concluded the company might not be able to actually find buyers for the material once it is sorted and ready for reuse in new products. Without buyers, the material would have to be landfilled.

And, Garcia warns, if PRI were to decide after five years to ditch the endeavor, DSNY and Sims "would still have to manage the costs and complications of having designated EPS as recyclable."



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NYC: Curbside foam can't be recycled

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:53
NYC: Curbside foam can't be recycled

By Bobby Elliott, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

In a controversial move, New York City has banned foam foodservice products on the grounds that they cannot be efficiently recycled through a curbside collection system.

"After consultations with corporations, including Dart Container Corporation, nonprofits, vendors and other stakeholders, the Department of Sanitation (DSNY) has determined that expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam cannot be recycled, which led to the ban," the city announced in a Dec. 8 press release. "DSNY has also determined that there currently is no market for post-consumer EPS collected in a curbside metal, glass and plastic recycling program."

It is widely known that post-consumer EPS can be recycled for use in picture frames and a variety of other products, and most communities that offer EPS collection do so through a drop-off format. While ban opponent Dart Container had secured an Indianapolis-based buyer for the New York City material, DSNY internal documents show the agency was not convinced of the long-term viability of an alternative plan to collect all polystyrene items curbside.

The ban was framed as an environmental victory by the city's mayor, Bill de Blasio, who had first proposed to outlaw select foam products in 2007 when he was a member of City Council.

"By removing nearly 30,000 tons of expanded polystyrene waste from our landfills, streets, and waterways, today's announcement is a major step towards our goal of a greener, greater New York City," de Blasio said in a statement.

Starting July 1, establishments throughout New York City will no longer be able to offer or sell foam food service products, such as cups and clamshell takeout trays. Foam packing peanuts will also be banned and compostable plates will be the new norm at the city's public school cafeterias. All other rigid polystyrene products will continue to be landfilled.

The decision was challenged by foam manufacturer Dart, which lobbied hard against the ban and pushed for the addition of all PS to the city's curbside recycling program.

"In the year since the ban was first proposed, foam manufacturers like Dart were given an opportunity to prove that foam foodservice items could be economically and logistically recycled within the city’s five boroughs," a press release reads. "Dart conducted real world tests that unequivocally proved this feasibility."

As the Dart release notes, the foam ban was approved by City Council members in late 2013, but included a compromise that gave Dart and others a year to prove recycling foam curbside could be effective within the city. The DSNY had until Jan. 1 to make a decision on whether to push through the ban or go with Dart's alternative proposal.

The decision to ban foam, as outlined in a letter to de Blasio from DSNY Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, came down to several reservations administrators had Dart's proposed recycling plan and timeline for recycling curbside PS and EPS.

The city estimates roughly 60,000 tons of polystyrene products enter the waste stream each year, with about half that total constituting EPS.

Under Dart's plan, all PS and EPS would have been collected curbside by DSNY, optically sorted and baled by Sims Municipal Recycling and sold to Plastics Recycling Inc. (PRI) in Indianapolis. Dart agreed to fund the addition of sorters at Sims' Brooklyn MRF and the expansion of PRI's facility. In addition, Dart secured a five-year pact with PRI to guarantee a buyer for New York City's post-consumer PS, including foam foodservice packaging.

But Garcia's letter shows city leaders felt putting such an infrastructure in place would take too much time. DSNY contends the addition of sorters at Sims' facility would take up to two years to complete. "As such, EPS would not be recycled until late 2016 or early 2017," Garcia's letter states.

In addition, PRI's necessary expansion to take on the material is not expected to be completed until "late spring 2015," DSNY says. According to the letter, question marks continue to surround the company's ability to process post-consumer PS and EPS.

Calling the PRI addition "a first of its kind in scale and operation," DSNY concluded the company might not be able to actually find buyers for the material once it is sorted and ready for reuse in new products. Without buyers, the material would have to be landfilled.

And, Garcia warns, if PRI were to decide after five years to ditch the endeavor, DSNY and Sims "would still have to manage the costs and complications of having designated EPS as recyclable."


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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Meeting and learning

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:43
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Meeting and learning

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

Several pre-conference workshops and events will be available in conjunction with the sixth annual Resource Recycling Conference, allowing attendees to get even more value out of North America's leading municipal recycling gathering.

The extra education opportunities include: GRRN Zero Waste Training, the National Recycling Coalition Annual Membership Meeting and Board Meeting, the third annual Recycling Innovators Forum, Re-Trac Connect Training and more.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is taking place Sept. 28-30 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown in Indianapolis, Indiana. Check rrconference.com for information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.

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Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Meeting and learning

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:43
Resource Recycling Conference 2015: Meeting and learning

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

Several pre-conference workshops and events will be available in conjunction with the sixth annual Resource Recycling Conference, allowing attendees to get even more value out of North America's leading municipal recycling gathering.

The extra education opportunities include: GRRN Zero Waste Training, the National Recycling Coalition Annual Membership Meeting and Board Meeting, the third annual Recycling Innovators Forum, Re-Trac Connect Training and more.

Resource Recycling Conference 2015 is taking place Sept. 28-30, 2015 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown in Indianapolis, Indiana. Check rrconference.com for information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


To return to the Resource Recycling newsletter, click here

Oregon notches its highest ever recovery rate

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:36
Oregon notches its highest ever recovery rate

By Jared Paben, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

Nearly 54 percent of materials discarded by Oregon households and businesses were recovered in 2013, a record high percentage for the state.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality reported that 2,425,220 tons were recovered in 2013, for a 53.9 percent recovery rate. That represents the highest recovery rate since the state began tracking waste generation and materials recovery in 1992.

According to the report, most of the recovery rate increase came through a boost in organic materials recovery, including animal waste/grease, wood, and yard debris and food scraps.

Changes in select categories in 2013, compared with 2012:

  • Non-food organics (including animal waste/grease, wood and yard debris): 909,612 tons recovered in 2013, up 7.3 percent
  • Cardboard: 361,748 tons, up 1.4 percent
  • Papers (including mixed-waste paper, high-grade and newspaper): 299,004 tons, flat
  • Glass (including container and “other”): 106,906 tons, flat
  • Food waste: 50,143 tons, up 5.2 percent
  • Plastics (including composite plastics, “other” and rigid plastic containers): 40,301 tons, down 5.2 percent
  • Non-scrap metal (including aluminum, tin cans, aerosol cans): 32,127 tons, flat
  • Electronics: 21,942 tons, down 15.4 percent
  • Plastic films: 14,583 tons, down 2 percent

Oregon’s recovery rate includes materials recycled, burned for energy recovery and composted. In 2013, 66 percent of the recovered materials were recycled, 20 percent were composted and 14 percent were burned for energy recovery, according to the report.

The 53.9 percent recovery rate also includes 3.8 percentage points of credits that counties and cities can claim for operating state-certified waste prevention, reuse and residential composting programs. Not counting those credits, the statewide recovery rate was 50.1 percent in 2013.

Oregonians also sent less material to the landfill, on a per-capita basis. In 2013, they disposed of 3.4 pounds per person per day, 0.5 percent less than the year before and 29.8 percent less than the pre-recession high in 2006, “likely indicating that Oregonians are still buying and consuming less,” according to the report.

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Oregon notches its highest-ever recovery rate

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:36
Oregon notches its highest-ever recovery rate

By Jared Paben, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

Nearly 54 percent of materials discarded by Oregon households and businesses were recovered in 2013, a record high percentage for the state.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality reported that 2,425,220 tons were recovered in 2013, for a 53.9 percent recovery rate. That represents the highest recovery rate since the state began tracking waste generation and materials recovery in 1992.

According to the report, most of the recovery rate increase came through a boost in organic materials recovery, including animal waste/grease, wood, and yard debris and food scraps.

Changes in select categories in 2013, compared with 2012:

  • Non-food organics (including animal waste/grease, wood and yard debris): 909,612 tons recovered in 2013, up 7.3 percent
  • Cardboard: 361,748 tons, up 1.4 percent
  • Papers (including mixed-waste paper, high-grade and newspaper): 299,004 tons, flat
  • Glass (including container and “other”): 106,906 tons, flat
  • Food waste: 50,143 tons, up 5.2 percent
  • Plastics (including composite plastics, “other” and rigid plastic containers): 40,301 tons, down 5.2 percent
  • Non-scrap metal (including aluminum, tin cans, aerosol cans): 32,127 tons, flat
  • Electronics: 21,942 tons, down 15.4 percent
  • Plastic films: 14,583 tons, down 2 percent

 

Oregon’s recovery rate includes materials recycled, burned for energy recovery and composted. In 2013, 66 percent of the recovered materials were recycled, 20 percent were composted and 14 percent were burned for energy recovery, according to the report.

The 53.9 percent recovery rate also includes 3.8 percentage points of credits that counties and cities can claim for operating state-certified waste prevention, reuse and residential composting programs. Not counting those credits, the statewide recovery rate was 50.1 percent in 2013.

Oregonians also sent less material to the landfill, on a per-capita basis. In 2013, they disposed of 3.4 pounds per person per day, 0.5 percent less than the year before and 29.8 percent less than the pre-recession high in 2006, “likely indicating that Oregonians are still buying and consuming less,” according to the report.

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NRC to "accelerate" talk around sustainable materials management

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:30
NRC to "accelerate" talk around sustainable materials management

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

The National Recycling Coalition has announced the inaugural Sustainable Materials Management Summit.

Slated to take place May 12-13 at University of Maryland, College Park, the Summit will aim to foster a broader national dialogue on the topic, said NRC's board president, Mark Lichtenstein.

"Ultimately we want to accelerate sustainable materials management (SMM) as a method of choice for avoiding the generation of discarded material," Lichtenstein said in an announcement. "At this Summit, a focus will be on the sustainable management of materials that have been discarded."

Approximately 200 industry members will convene in Maryland for the event. By the end of the meeting, NRC hopes to have the beginnings of a "SMM National Plan" to further coordinate materials management throughout the waste industry, incorporating local, state and federal governments alongside trade and nonprofit groups and businesses.

The U.S. EPA defines SMM as "a systemic approach to using and reusing materials more productively over their entire life cycles." That approach includes the design of materials and products as well as enhancing the durability, lifespan and recyclability of goods.

"It's all about redesigning to eliminate products and packaging that currently are a problem to use productively," said NRC board member Gary Liss. "A key for the future is highlighting how important it is to focus on some of the upstream activities beyond recycling that will support recyclers getting their job done better, eliminating the difficult-to-recycle products by redesigning those out of the stream and helping to develop new markets and innovative uses for materials, products and packaging that hasn't been done heretofore."


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NRC to "accelerate" talk around sustainable materials management

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:30
NRC to "accelerate" talk around sustainable materials management

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

Jan. 13, 2015

The National Recycling Coalition has announced the inaugural Sustainable Materials Management Summit.

Slated to take place May 12-13 at University of Maryland, College Park, the Summit will aim to foster a broader national dialogue on the topic, NRC's board president and CEO Mark Lichtenstein says.

"Ultimately we want to accelerate sustainable materials management (SMM) as a method of choice for avoiding the generation of discarded material," Lichtenstein said in the announcement. "At this Summit, a focus will be on the sustainable management of materials that have been discarded."

Approximately 200 industry members will convene in Maryland for the event. At its close, NRC hopes to have the beginnings of a "SMM National Plan" to further coordinate materials management throughout the waste industry, incorporating local, state and federal governments alongside trade and nonprofit groups and businesses.

The U.S. EPA defines SMM as "a systemic approach to using and reusing materials more productively over their entire life cycles." That approach includes the design of materials and products as well as enhancing the durability, lifespan and recyclability of goods.

"It's all about redesigning to eliminate products and packaging that currently are a problem to use productively," said NRC board member Gary Liss. "A key for the future is highlighting how important it is to focus on some of the upstream activities beyond recycling that will support recyclers getting their job done better, eliminating the difficult-to-recycle products by redesigning those out of the stream and helping to develop new markets and innovative uses for materials, products and packaging that hasn't been done heretofore."

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Grant watch

Resource Recycling Magazine - Mon, 01/12/2015 - 20:22
Grant watch

Jan. 13, 2015

Programs throughout Nebraska will receive more than $2 million in grants aimed at recycling efforts, clean-ups and public education efforts, according to the state Department of Environmental Quality. The state awarded 57 grants to various organizations for 2015. Among the largest grants was a $121,000 grant to Lincoln-based WasteCap Nebraska to facilitate business recycling, zero-waste activities, webinars, waste audits and other administrative costs. The Litter Reduction and Recycling Grant Program has been providing funding in the Cornhusker State since 1979.

The state of Delaware is now accepting applications for recycling grants and low-interest loans. The Universal Recycling Grants and Low Interest Loan Program is designed to help pay for recyclables collection programs, with an emphasis on startup costs for residential single-stream collection efforts. It’s also designed to help fund initiatives to recycle materials that would otherwise be landfilled, with an emphasis on school recycling programs. The application deadline is March 3.

Keep America Beautiful has announced a national grants program aimed at recycling discarded cigarette butts. The 2015 Cigarette Litter Prevention Program will offer 50 grants that total $275,000.

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